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Viral strain dependent differences in experimental Argentine hemorrhagic fever (Junin virus) infection of guinea pigs.
Intervirology. 1988; 29(3):133-43.I

Abstract

Guinea pigs infected with low-passage Junin virus of human origin showed viral strain dependent differences in mortality, LD50, time to death, and in viral spread and distribution. Different Junin strains appeared to cause at least two broad patterns of Argentine hemorrhagic fever in guinea pigs. A number of strains of Junin virus caused a viscerotropic type of illness in which virus replicated predominantly in lymph nodes, spleen, and bone marrow. With the most severe visceral forms of Argentine hemorrhagic fever, the guinea pigs became viremic, developed necrosis of spleen, lymph nodes, and bone marrow, showed gastric hemorrhages, and all animals died within 13-15 days. Other Junin strains induced a neurological type of illness with transient viral replication in and lymphocyte depletion of spleen and lymph nodes, with no detectable viremia or viral replication in bone marrow. Subsequently, virus was found in the brain with varying severities of polioencephalitis, and the guinea pigs frequently showed rear leg paralysis before death occurred 28-34 days after inoculation. Not all animals infected with a neurotropic strain developed all these signs. One viral strain induced some signs characteristic of both patterns of illness. Although the disease forms in the guinea pig model did not strictly correlate with those observed in the humans from which these strains were obtained, the different strains of Junin virus consistently caused very different patterns of illness in infected guinea pigs.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Disease Assessment Division, United States Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases, Fort Detrick, Frederick, Md 21701-5011.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

2846464

Citation

Kenyon, R H., et al. "Viral Strain Dependent Differences in Experimental Argentine Hemorrhagic Fever (Junin Virus) Infection of Guinea Pigs." Intervirology, vol. 29, no. 3, 1988, pp. 133-43.
Kenyon RH, Green DE, Maiztegui JI, et al. Viral strain dependent differences in experimental Argentine hemorrhagic fever (Junin virus) infection of guinea pigs. Intervirology. 1988;29(3):133-43.
Kenyon, R. H., Green, D. E., Maiztegui, J. I., & Peters, C. J. (1988). Viral strain dependent differences in experimental Argentine hemorrhagic fever (Junin virus) infection of guinea pigs. Intervirology, 29(3), 133-43.
Kenyon RH, et al. Viral Strain Dependent Differences in Experimental Argentine Hemorrhagic Fever (Junin Virus) Infection of Guinea Pigs. Intervirology. 1988;29(3):133-43. PubMed PMID: 2846464.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Viral strain dependent differences in experimental Argentine hemorrhagic fever (Junin virus) infection of guinea pigs. AU - Kenyon,R H, AU - Green,D E, AU - Maiztegui,J I, AU - Peters,C J, PY - 1988/1/1/pubmed PY - 1988/1/1/medline PY - 1988/1/1/entrez SP - 133 EP - 43 JF - Intervirology JO - Intervirology VL - 29 IS - 3 N2 - Guinea pigs infected with low-passage Junin virus of human origin showed viral strain dependent differences in mortality, LD50, time to death, and in viral spread and distribution. Different Junin strains appeared to cause at least two broad patterns of Argentine hemorrhagic fever in guinea pigs. A number of strains of Junin virus caused a viscerotropic type of illness in which virus replicated predominantly in lymph nodes, spleen, and bone marrow. With the most severe visceral forms of Argentine hemorrhagic fever, the guinea pigs became viremic, developed necrosis of spleen, lymph nodes, and bone marrow, showed gastric hemorrhages, and all animals died within 13-15 days. Other Junin strains induced a neurological type of illness with transient viral replication in and lymphocyte depletion of spleen and lymph nodes, with no detectable viremia or viral replication in bone marrow. Subsequently, virus was found in the brain with varying severities of polioencephalitis, and the guinea pigs frequently showed rear leg paralysis before death occurred 28-34 days after inoculation. Not all animals infected with a neurotropic strain developed all these signs. One viral strain induced some signs characteristic of both patterns of illness. Although the disease forms in the guinea pig model did not strictly correlate with those observed in the humans from which these strains were obtained, the different strains of Junin virus consistently caused very different patterns of illness in infected guinea pigs. SN - 0300-5526 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/2846464/Viral_strain_dependent_differences_in_experimental_Argentine_hemorrhagic_fever__Junin_virus__infection_of_guinea_pigs_ L2 - https://www.karger.com?DOI=10.1159/000150039 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -