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Mindfulness-based stress reduction for breast cancer patients: a mixed method study on what patients experience as a suitable stage to participate.
Support Care Cancer 2017; 25(10):3067-3074SC

Abstract

PURPOSE

Breast cancer is associated with high levels of psychological distress. Mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) has proven to be effective in reducing distress in cancer patients. In several studies, patients who are currently undergoing somatic anticancer treatment are excluded from participating in MBSR. Little is known about what would be the most suitable stage of disease to offer MBSR. We examined whether stage of disease facilitated and/or hindered participation in MBSR for breast cancer patients.

METHOD

A mixed method design was used. Self-report questionnaires on psychological distress (HADS) and quality of life (EORTC QLQ-C30) were administered before and after MBSR. Five focus groups and three semi-structured individual interviews were conducted. Qualitative data were analyzed with the constant comparative method in order to develop a grounded theory.

RESULTS

Sixty-four females participated in MBSR. In 52 patients who completed the questionnaires, psychological distress improved significantly. Qualitative data showed that participating in MBSR both during and after anticancer treatment has specific advantages and disadvantages. Interestingly, being emotionally ready to take part in MBSR seems equally important as physical ability. Informing patients at an early stage seemed to strengthen autonomy and self-management skills.

CONCLUSIONS

In contrast to the common practice to tailoring the timing of MBSR to physical impairments or demands of the anticancer treatment, our findings revealed that emotional readiness is equally important to take into account. These findings might support professionals in their choices whether and when to inform and refer patients to MBSR.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Helen Dowling Institute, Centre for Psycho-Oncology, Bilthoven, the Netherlands. else.bisseling@radboudumc.nl. Radboud Centre for Mindfulness, Department of Psychiatry, Radboud University Medical Centre, Postbus 9101, Huispostnummer: 966/Mindfulness, 6500, HB, Nijmegen, the Netherlands. else.bisseling@radboudumc.nl.Radboud Centre for Mindfulness, Department of Psychiatry, Radboud University Medical Centre, Postbus 9101, Huispostnummer: 966/Mindfulness, 6500, HB, Nijmegen, the Netherlands.Radboud Centre for Mindfulness, Department of Psychiatry, Radboud University Medical Centre, Postbus 9101, Huispostnummer: 966/Mindfulness, 6500, HB, Nijmegen, the Netherlands.Department of Medical Oncology, Academic Medical Centre, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, the Netherlands.Department of Medical Psychology, Radboud University Medical Centre, Nijmegen, the Netherlands.Radboud Centre for Mindfulness, Department of Psychiatry, Radboud University Medical Centre, Postbus 9101, Huispostnummer: 966/Mindfulness, 6500, HB, Nijmegen, the Netherlands.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

28470371

Citation

Bisseling, Else M., et al. "Mindfulness-based Stress Reduction for Breast Cancer Patients: a Mixed Method Study On what Patients Experience as a Suitable Stage to Participate." Supportive Care in Cancer : Official Journal of the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer, vol. 25, no. 10, 2017, pp. 3067-3074.
Bisseling EM, Schellekens MPJ, Jansen ETM, et al. Mindfulness-based stress reduction for breast cancer patients: a mixed method study on what patients experience as a suitable stage to participate. Support Care Cancer. 2017;25(10):3067-3074.
Bisseling, E. M., Schellekens, M. P. J., Jansen, E. T. M., van Laarhoven, H. W. M., Prins, J. B., & Speckens, A. E. M. (2017). Mindfulness-based stress reduction for breast cancer patients: a mixed method study on what patients experience as a suitable stage to participate. Supportive Care in Cancer : Official Journal of the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer, 25(10), pp. 3067-3074. doi:10.1007/s00520-017-3714-8.
Bisseling EM, et al. Mindfulness-based Stress Reduction for Breast Cancer Patients: a Mixed Method Study On what Patients Experience as a Suitable Stage to Participate. Support Care Cancer. 2017;25(10):3067-3074. PubMed PMID: 28470371.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Mindfulness-based stress reduction for breast cancer patients: a mixed method study on what patients experience as a suitable stage to participate. AU - Bisseling,Else M, AU - Schellekens,Melanie P J, AU - Jansen,Ellen T M, AU - van Laarhoven,Hanneke W M, AU - Prins,Judith B, AU - Speckens,Anne E M, Y1 - 2017/05/04/ PY - 2016/12/09/received PY - 2017/04/17/accepted PY - 2017/5/5/pubmed PY - 2018/10/26/medline PY - 2017/5/5/entrez KW - Breast cancer KW - Disease stage KW - MBSR KW - Mindfulness KW - Qualitative KW - Timing SP - 3067 EP - 3074 JF - Supportive care in cancer : official journal of the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer JO - Support Care Cancer VL - 25 IS - 10 N2 - PURPOSE: Breast cancer is associated with high levels of psychological distress. Mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) has proven to be effective in reducing distress in cancer patients. In several studies, patients who are currently undergoing somatic anticancer treatment are excluded from participating in MBSR. Little is known about what would be the most suitable stage of disease to offer MBSR. We examined whether stage of disease facilitated and/or hindered participation in MBSR for breast cancer patients. METHOD: A mixed method design was used. Self-report questionnaires on psychological distress (HADS) and quality of life (EORTC QLQ-C30) were administered before and after MBSR. Five focus groups and three semi-structured individual interviews were conducted. Qualitative data were analyzed with the constant comparative method in order to develop a grounded theory. RESULTS: Sixty-four females participated in MBSR. In 52 patients who completed the questionnaires, psychological distress improved significantly. Qualitative data showed that participating in MBSR both during and after anticancer treatment has specific advantages and disadvantages. Interestingly, being emotionally ready to take part in MBSR seems equally important as physical ability. Informing patients at an early stage seemed to strengthen autonomy and self-management skills. CONCLUSIONS: In contrast to the common practice to tailoring the timing of MBSR to physical impairments or demands of the anticancer treatment, our findings revealed that emotional readiness is equally important to take into account. These findings might support professionals in their choices whether and when to inform and refer patients to MBSR. SN - 1433-7339 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28470371/Mindfulness_based_stress_reduction_for_breast_cancer_patients:_a_mixed_method_study_on_what_patients_experience_as_a_suitable_stage_to_participate_ L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00520-017-3714-8 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -