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Epidemiology of systemic lupus erythematosus.
Expert Rev Clin Immunol 2017; 13(8):799-814ER

Abstract

INTRODUCTION

Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a disease distributed worldwide, which occurs in both genders, and across racial/ethnic and age groups; however, higher rates are observed in adults, in women and in non-Caucasians. Genetic, environmental, sociodemographic and methodological issues are responsible not only for these differences but for the variable course and outcome of the disease. Non-Caucasians have a more severe disease with a higher risk for early mortality and damage accrual. Males also have a more severe disease; however, a negative impact of male gender on lupus outcomes has not been firmly established. Childhood-onset is associated with a more severe disease; moreover, it is also associated with higher damage and diminished survival; finally, late-onset lupus is mild but it is associated with higher damage accrual and a diminished survival. Areas covered: In this review, we discuss the incidence and prevalence of SLE, the impact of age, gender and race/ethnicity in SLE and in the survival of those affected. Expert commentary: Age, gender and race/ethnicity impact disease expression in SLE patients; despite improvements in survival, mortality in SLE remains almost three times higher than in the general population.

Authors+Show Affiliations

a Department of Autoimmune Diseases , Institut Clinic de Medicina I Dermatologia, Hospital Clinic , Barcelona , Catalonia , Spain. b Division of Rheumatology and Autoimmune Diseases , Sanatorio Parque, Grupo Oroño , Rosario , Argentina.c Servicio de Reumatología , Hospital Nacional Guillermo Almenara Irigoyen, EsSalud , Lima , Perú. d School of Medicine , Universidad Científica del Sur , Lima , Perú.e Division of Clinical Immunology and Rheumatology, School of Medicine , The University of Alabama at Birmingham , Birmingham , AL , USA. f Department of Medicine, School of Medicine , Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia , Lima , Perú.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

28471259

Citation

Pons-Estel, Guillermo J., et al. "Epidemiology of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus." Expert Review of Clinical Immunology, vol. 13, no. 8, 2017, pp. 799-814.
Pons-Estel GJ, Ugarte-Gil MF, Alarcón GS. Epidemiology of systemic lupus erythematosus. Expert Rev Clin Immunol. 2017;13(8):799-814.
Pons-Estel, G. J., Ugarte-Gil, M. F., & Alarcón, G. S. (2017). Epidemiology of systemic lupus erythematosus. Expert Review of Clinical Immunology, 13(8), pp. 799-814. doi:10.1080/1744666X.2017.1327352.
Pons-Estel GJ, Ugarte-Gil MF, Alarcón GS. Epidemiology of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus. Expert Rev Clin Immunol. 2017;13(8):799-814. PubMed PMID: 28471259.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Epidemiology of systemic lupus erythematosus. AU - Pons-Estel,Guillermo J, AU - Ugarte-Gil,Manuel F, AU - Alarcón,Graciela S, Y1 - 2017/05/16/ PY - 2017/5/5/pubmed PY - 2018/4/10/medline PY - 2017/5/5/entrez KW - Systemic lupus erythematosus KW - age KW - epidemiology KW - gender KW - incidence KW - prevalence KW - race /ethnicity KW - survival /mortality SP - 799 EP - 814 JF - Expert review of clinical immunology JO - Expert Rev Clin Immunol VL - 13 IS - 8 N2 - INTRODUCTION: Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a disease distributed worldwide, which occurs in both genders, and across racial/ethnic and age groups; however, higher rates are observed in adults, in women and in non-Caucasians. Genetic, environmental, sociodemographic and methodological issues are responsible not only for these differences but for the variable course and outcome of the disease. Non-Caucasians have a more severe disease with a higher risk for early mortality and damage accrual. Males also have a more severe disease; however, a negative impact of male gender on lupus outcomes has not been firmly established. Childhood-onset is associated with a more severe disease; moreover, it is also associated with higher damage and diminished survival; finally, late-onset lupus is mild but it is associated with higher damage accrual and a diminished survival. Areas covered: In this review, we discuss the incidence and prevalence of SLE, the impact of age, gender and race/ethnicity in SLE and in the survival of those affected. Expert commentary: Age, gender and race/ethnicity impact disease expression in SLE patients; despite improvements in survival, mortality in SLE remains almost three times higher than in the general population. SN - 1744-8409 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28471259/Epidemiology_of_systemic_lupus_erythematosus_ L2 - http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/1744666X.2017.1327352 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -