Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Characterization of Microsatellites in Pseudogymnoascus destructans for White-nose Syndrome Genetic Analysis.
J Wildl Dis. 2017 10; 53(4):869-874.JW

Abstract

Despite only emerging in the past decade, white-nose syndrome has become among the most devastating wildlife diseases known. The pathogenic fungus Pseudogymnoascus destructans infects hibernating bats and typically leads to high rates of mortality at hibernacula during winter in North America. We developed a set of genetic markers to better differentiate P. destructans isolates. We designed and successfully characterized these 23 microsatellite markers of P. destructans for use in disease ecology and epidemiology research. We validated these loci with DNA extracted from a collection of P. destructans isolates from the US and Canada, as well as from Europe (the likely introduction source based on currently available data). Genetic diversity calculated for each locus and for the multilocus panel as a whole indicates sufficient allelic diversity to differentiate among and between samples from both Europe and North America. Indices of genetic diversity indicate a loss of allelic diversity that is consistent with the recent introduction and rapid spread of an emerging pathogen.

Authors+Show Affiliations

1 The Pathogen & Microbiome Institute, Northern Arizona University, PO Box 4073, Flagstaff, Arizona 86011, USA. 3 Current address: Department of Molecular, Cellular, and Biomedical Sciences, University of New Hampshire, 46 College Rd., Durham, New Hampshire 03824, USA.1 The Pathogen & Microbiome Institute, Northern Arizona University, PO Box 4073, Flagstaff, Arizona 86011, USA. 3 Current address: Department of Molecular, Cellular, and Biomedical Sciences, University of New Hampshire, 46 College Rd., Durham, New Hampshire 03824, USA.1 The Pathogen & Microbiome Institute, Northern Arizona University, PO Box 4073, Flagstaff, Arizona 86011, USA.1 The Pathogen & Microbiome Institute, Northern Arizona University, PO Box 4073, Flagstaff, Arizona 86011, USA.2 Institute of Zoology, University of Greifswald, Friedrich-Ludwig-Jahn-Str. 15a, D-17489 Greifswald, Germany.1 The Pathogen & Microbiome Institute, Northern Arizona University, PO Box 4073, Flagstaff, Arizona 86011, USA.1 The Pathogen & Microbiome Institute, Northern Arizona University, PO Box 4073, Flagstaff, Arizona 86011, USA. 3 Current address: Department of Molecular, Cellular, and Biomedical Sciences, University of New Hampshire, 46 College Rd., Durham, New Hampshire 03824, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

28475452

Citation

Drees, Kevin P., et al. "Characterization of Microsatellites in Pseudogymnoascus Destructans for White-nose Syndrome Genetic Analysis." Journal of Wildlife Diseases, vol. 53, no. 4, 2017, pp. 869-874.
Drees KP, Parise KL, Rivas SM, et al. Characterization of Microsatellites in Pseudogymnoascus destructans for White-nose Syndrome Genetic Analysis. J Wildl Dis. 2017;53(4):869-874.
Drees, K. P., Parise, K. L., Rivas, S. M., Felton, L. L., Puechmaille, S. J., Keim, P., & Foster, J. T. (2017). Characterization of Microsatellites in Pseudogymnoascus destructans for White-nose Syndrome Genetic Analysis. Journal of Wildlife Diseases, 53(4), 869-874. https://doi.org/10.7589/2016-09-217
Drees KP, et al. Characterization of Microsatellites in Pseudogymnoascus Destructans for White-nose Syndrome Genetic Analysis. J Wildl Dis. 2017;53(4):869-874. PubMed PMID: 28475452.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Characterization of Microsatellites in Pseudogymnoascus destructans for White-nose Syndrome Genetic Analysis. AU - Drees,Kevin P, AU - Parise,Katy L, AU - Rivas,Stephanie M, AU - Felton,Lindsey L, AU - Puechmaille,Sébastien J, AU - Keim,Paul, AU - Foster,Jeffrey T, Y1 - 2017/05/05/ PY - 2017/5/6/pubmed PY - 2018/3/28/medline PY - 2017/5/6/entrez KW - Bat KW - Chiroptera KW - Pseudogymnoascus (Geomyces) destructans KW - fungal pathogen KW - hibernation KW - microsatellite KW - white-nose syndrome SP - 869 EP - 874 JF - Journal of wildlife diseases JO - J. Wildl. Dis. VL - 53 IS - 4 N2 - Despite only emerging in the past decade, white-nose syndrome has become among the most devastating wildlife diseases known. The pathogenic fungus Pseudogymnoascus destructans infects hibernating bats and typically leads to high rates of mortality at hibernacula during winter in North America. We developed a set of genetic markers to better differentiate P. destructans isolates. We designed and successfully characterized these 23 microsatellite markers of P. destructans for use in disease ecology and epidemiology research. We validated these loci with DNA extracted from a collection of P. destructans isolates from the US and Canada, as well as from Europe (the likely introduction source based on currently available data). Genetic diversity calculated for each locus and for the multilocus panel as a whole indicates sufficient allelic diversity to differentiate among and between samples from both Europe and North America. Indices of genetic diversity indicate a loss of allelic diversity that is consistent with the recent introduction and rapid spread of an emerging pathogen. SN - 1943-3700 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28475452/Characterization_of_Microsatellites_in_Pseudogymnoascus_destructans_for_White_nose_Syndrome_Genetic_Analysis_ L2 - http://www.jwildlifedis.org/doi/10.7589/2016-09-217?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -