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Have Mischievous Responders Misidentified Sexual Minority Youth Disparities in the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health?
Arch Sex Behav. 2018 05; 47(4):1053-1067.AS

Abstract

The National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health (Add Health) has been instrumental in identifying sexual minority youth health disparities. Recent commentary suggested that some Wave 1 youth responders, especially males, intentionally mismarked same-sex attraction and, as a result, published reports of health disparities from these data may be suspect. We use two recently developed approaches to identify "jokesters" and mischievous responding and apply them to the Add Health data. First, we show that Wave 1 same-sex attracted youth, including those who later reported completely heterosexual identities in adulthood, were no more likely than different-sex attracted youth and consistently heterosexual participants to be "jokesters." Second, after accounting for mischievous responses, we replicated six previously established disparities: depressive symptoms, suicidal ideation and behaviors, alcohol use, cocaine use, parental satisfaction, and school connectedness. Accounting for mischievousness resulted in the elimination of one observed disparity between heterosexual and sexual minority youth: suicidal ideation for males who reported romantic attraction to both sexes. Results also showed that accounting for mischievous responding may underestimate disparities for sexual minority youth, particularly females. Overall, results presented here support previous studies that identified health disparities among sexual minority youth using these data.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Population Research Center, Department of Human Development and Family Sciences, University of Texas at Austin, 305 E. 23rd St., Stop G1800, Austin, TX, 78712, USA. jessica.fish@utexas.edu.Department of Human Development and Family Sciences, Population Research Center, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

28477095

Citation

Fish, Jessica N., and Stephen T. Russell. "Have Mischievous Responders Misidentified Sexual Minority Youth Disparities in the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health?" Archives of Sexual Behavior, vol. 47, no. 4, 2018, pp. 1053-1067.
Fish JN, Russell ST. Have Mischievous Responders Misidentified Sexual Minority Youth Disparities in the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health? Arch Sex Behav. 2018;47(4):1053-1067.
Fish, J. N., & Russell, S. T. (2018). Have Mischievous Responders Misidentified Sexual Minority Youth Disparities in the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health? Archives of Sexual Behavior, 47(4), 1053-1067. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10508-017-0993-6
Fish JN, Russell ST. Have Mischievous Responders Misidentified Sexual Minority Youth Disparities in the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health. Arch Sex Behav. 2018;47(4):1053-1067. PubMed PMID: 28477095.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Have Mischievous Responders Misidentified Sexual Minority Youth Disparities in the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health? AU - Fish,Jessica N, AU - Russell,Stephen T, Y1 - 2017/05/05/ PY - 2016/05/05/received PY - 2017/04/19/accepted PY - 2017/04/18/revised PY - 2017/5/10/pubmed PY - 2019/9/12/medline PY - 2017/5/7/entrez KW - Add Health KW - Adolescence KW - Alcohol KW - LGB KW - Mental health KW - Sexual orientation SP - 1053 EP - 1067 JF - Archives of sexual behavior JO - Arch Sex Behav VL - 47 IS - 4 N2 - The National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health (Add Health) has been instrumental in identifying sexual minority youth health disparities. Recent commentary suggested that some Wave 1 youth responders, especially males, intentionally mismarked same-sex attraction and, as a result, published reports of health disparities from these data may be suspect. We use two recently developed approaches to identify "jokesters" and mischievous responding and apply them to the Add Health data. First, we show that Wave 1 same-sex attracted youth, including those who later reported completely heterosexual identities in adulthood, were no more likely than different-sex attracted youth and consistently heterosexual participants to be "jokesters." Second, after accounting for mischievous responses, we replicated six previously established disparities: depressive symptoms, suicidal ideation and behaviors, alcohol use, cocaine use, parental satisfaction, and school connectedness. Accounting for mischievousness resulted in the elimination of one observed disparity between heterosexual and sexual minority youth: suicidal ideation for males who reported romantic attraction to both sexes. Results also showed that accounting for mischievous responding may underestimate disparities for sexual minority youth, particularly females. Overall, results presented here support previous studies that identified health disparities among sexual minority youth using these data. SN - 1573-2800 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28477095/Have_Mischievous_Responders_Misidentified_Sexual_Minority_Youth_Disparities_in_the_National_Longitudinal_Study_of_Adolescent_to_Adult_Health L2 - https://doi.org/10.1007/s10508-017-0993-6 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -