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Vitamin D Status and Bone Mineral Density in Children with Inflammatory Bowel Disease Compared to Those with Functional Abdominal Pain.
J Korean Med Sci. 2017 Jun; 32(6):961-967.JK

Abstract

Low vitamin D has been implicated in reduced bone mineral density (BMD) in children with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Our study aimed to evaluate differences in serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25[OH]D) and total body less head (TBLH) BMD z-scores in children with Crohn's disease (CD), ulcerative colitis (UC), and those with abdominal pain-related functional gastrointestinal disorder (AP-FGID) as the control group. We also examined the correlation between serum 25(OH)D and TBLH BMD z-score, and factors that affect each of these parameters. A total of 105 children were included and divided into 3 groups: AP-FGID (n = 45), CD (n = 43), and UC (n = 17). Among the 3 study groups, TBLH BMD z-scores were found to be significantly different (0.5 ± 0.8 in CD vs. 0.1 ± 0.8 in UC vs. -0.1 ± 1.1 in FGID; P = 0.037), despite similar levels of serum 25(OH)D. Within each study group, correlation between serum 25(OH)D and TBLH BMD z-score was not observed. Factors found to affect the TBLH BMD z-score were sex (P = 0.018), age (P = 0.005) and serum hemoglobin (P = 0.041), while factors influencing serum 25(OH)D were sex (P = 0.018), CD with reference to AP-FGID (P = 0.020), and serum phosphorus (P = 0.018). Based on our results, vitamin D is a relatively small contributor to bone loss in pediatric IBD and clinicians should consider female sex, older age, and low hemoglobin as risk factors for low BMD in children with IBD.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Melbourne Medical School, Univeristy of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia. Department of Pediatrics, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam, Korea.Department of Pediatrics, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam, Korea.Department of Pediatrics, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam, Korea. Department of Pediatrics, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. hryang@snubh.org.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

28480654

Citation

Sohn, Jenny, et al. "Vitamin D Status and Bone Mineral Density in Children With Inflammatory Bowel Disease Compared to Those With Functional Abdominal Pain." Journal of Korean Medical Science, vol. 32, no. 6, 2017, pp. 961-967.
Sohn J, Chang EJ, Yang HR. Vitamin D Status and Bone Mineral Density in Children with Inflammatory Bowel Disease Compared to Those with Functional Abdominal Pain. J Korean Med Sci. 2017;32(6):961-967.
Sohn, J., Chang, E. J., & Yang, H. R. (2017). Vitamin D Status and Bone Mineral Density in Children with Inflammatory Bowel Disease Compared to Those with Functional Abdominal Pain. Journal of Korean Medical Science, 32(6), 961-967. https://doi.org/10.3346/jkms.2017.32.6.961
Sohn J, Chang EJ, Yang HR. Vitamin D Status and Bone Mineral Density in Children With Inflammatory Bowel Disease Compared to Those With Functional Abdominal Pain. J Korean Med Sci. 2017;32(6):961-967. PubMed PMID: 28480654.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Vitamin D Status and Bone Mineral Density in Children with Inflammatory Bowel Disease Compared to Those with Functional Abdominal Pain. AU - Sohn,Jenny, AU - Chang,Eun Jae, AU - Yang,Hye Ran, PY - 2016/12/09/received PY - 2017/02/11/accepted PY - 2017/5/9/entrez PY - 2017/5/10/pubmed PY - 2018/2/21/medline KW - Asian KW - Bone Mineral Density KW - Children KW - Inflammatory Bowel Disease KW - Vitamin D SP - 961 EP - 967 JF - Journal of Korean medical science JO - J. Korean Med. Sci. VL - 32 IS - 6 N2 - Low vitamin D has been implicated in reduced bone mineral density (BMD) in children with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Our study aimed to evaluate differences in serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25[OH]D) and total body less head (TBLH) BMD z-scores in children with Crohn's disease (CD), ulcerative colitis (UC), and those with abdominal pain-related functional gastrointestinal disorder (AP-FGID) as the control group. We also examined the correlation between serum 25(OH)D and TBLH BMD z-score, and factors that affect each of these parameters. A total of 105 children were included and divided into 3 groups: AP-FGID (n = 45), CD (n = 43), and UC (n = 17). Among the 3 study groups, TBLH BMD z-scores were found to be significantly different (0.5 ± 0.8 in CD vs. 0.1 ± 0.8 in UC vs. -0.1 ± 1.1 in FGID; P = 0.037), despite similar levels of serum 25(OH)D. Within each study group, correlation between serum 25(OH)D and TBLH BMD z-score was not observed. Factors found to affect the TBLH BMD z-score were sex (P = 0.018), age (P = 0.005) and serum hemoglobin (P = 0.041), while factors influencing serum 25(OH)D were sex (P = 0.018), CD with reference to AP-FGID (P = 0.020), and serum phosphorus (P = 0.018). Based on our results, vitamin D is a relatively small contributor to bone loss in pediatric IBD and clinicians should consider female sex, older age, and low hemoglobin as risk factors for low BMD in children with IBD. SN - 1598-6357 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28480654/Vitamin_D_Status_and_Bone_Mineral_Density_in_Children_with_Inflammatory_Bowel_Disease_Compared_to_Those_with_Functional_Abdominal_Pain_ L2 - https://jkms.org/DOIx.php?id=10.3346/jkms.2017.32.6.961 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -