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Study on the tolerance and adaptation of rats to Angiostrongylus cantonensis infection.
Parasitol Res. 2017 Jul; 116(7):1937-1945.PR

Abstract

Angiostrongylus cantonensis (A. cantonensis) is the most common infectious agent causing eosinophilic meningitis. As an important food-borne parasitic disease, angiostrongyliasis cantonensis is an emerging infectious disease which brings severe harm to central nerve system of human. Rat, one of the few permissive hosts of A. cantonensis known to date, plays an indispensable role in the worm's life cycle. However, the tolerance and adaptation of rat to A. cantonensis infection is rarely understood. In this study, we infected rats with different numbers the third stage larvae (L3) of A. cantonensis and explored their tolerance through analysis on survival curve, neurological function score, and detection of pathological damages in organs including the brain, lung, and heart of the animals. Results indicated that rats' survival condition worsens, and body weight dropped more significantly as more worms were used for infection. Death appeared in groups infected with 80 and more A. cantonesnsis per rat. Morris water maze revealed that the neurological function of rats damaged gradually with increasing infection number of A. cantonensis larvae. When the number of infected parasite exceeded 240 per animal, rats showed significant neurological impairments. Collection of A. cantonensis from rat lung after 35 days of infection implied an upper limit for worm entry, and the average length of worm was inversely proportional to the infection amount, while the ratio between female and male worms was positively related to the infection number. The degree of pulmonary and cardiac inflammation was proportional to the infection number of A. cantonensis. Meanwhile, there existed considerable amount of adult worms in rat's right atrium and right ventricle, leading to a right heart myocardial inflammation. The present study firstly reports the tolerance and adaptation of rat, a permissive host of A. cantonensis to its infection, which will not only provide accurate technical parameters for maintaining A. cantonensis life cycle under laboratory conditions but also help unveil the underlying mechanism of the distinct pathological outcomes in the permissive and non-permissive hosts with A. cantonensis infection.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Zhongshan School of Medicine, Sun Yat-sen University, 74 2nd Zhongshan Road, Guangzhou, 510080, China. Key Laboratory of Tropical Disease Control, Ministry of Education, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, 510080, China. Provincial Engineering Technology Research Center for Biological Vector Control, Guangzhou, 510080, China.School of Life Sciences, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, SAR, China. State Key Laboratory of Agrobiotechnology, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, SAR, China.The Affiliated High School of South China Normal University, Guangzhou, 510630, China.Department of Clinical Laboratory, Sun Yat-sen Memorial Hospital of Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, 510120, China.Zhongshan School of Medicine, Sun Yat-sen University, 74 2nd Zhongshan Road, Guangzhou, 510080, China. Key Laboratory of Tropical Disease Control, Ministry of Education, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, 510080, China. Provincial Engineering Technology Research Center for Biological Vector Control, Guangzhou, 510080, China.Zhongshan School of Medicine, Sun Yat-sen University, 74 2nd Zhongshan Road, Guangzhou, 510080, China. Key Laboratory of Tropical Disease Control, Ministry of Education, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, 510080, China. Provincial Engineering Technology Research Center for Biological Vector Control, Guangzhou, 510080, China.Zhongshan School of Medicine, Sun Yat-sen University, 74 2nd Zhongshan Road, Guangzhou, 510080, China. Key Laboratory of Tropical Disease Control, Ministry of Education, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, 510080, China. Provincial Engineering Technology Research Center for Biological Vector Control, Guangzhou, 510080, China.Zhongshan School of Medicine, Sun Yat-sen University, 74 2nd Zhongshan Road, Guangzhou, 510080, China. Key Laboratory of Tropical Disease Control, Ministry of Education, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, 510080, China. Provincial Engineering Technology Research Center for Biological Vector Control, Guangzhou, 510080, China.Zhongshan School of Medicine, Sun Yat-sen University, 74 2nd Zhongshan Road, Guangzhou, 510080, China. Key Laboratory of Tropical Disease Control, Ministry of Education, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, 510080, China. Provincial Engineering Technology Research Center for Biological Vector Control, Guangzhou, 510080, China.Zhongshan School of Medicine, Sun Yat-sen University, 74 2nd Zhongshan Road, Guangzhou, 510080, China. Key Laboratory of Tropical Disease Control, Ministry of Education, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, 510080, China. Provincial Engineering Technology Research Center for Biological Vector Control, Guangzhou, 510080, China.Zhongshan School of Medicine, Sun Yat-sen University, 74 2nd Zhongshan Road, Guangzhou, 510080, China. Key Laboratory of Tropical Disease Control, Ministry of Education, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, 510080, China. Provincial Engineering Technology Research Center for Biological Vector Control, Guangzhou, 510080, China.Zhongshan School of Medicine, Sun Yat-sen University, 74 2nd Zhongshan Road, Guangzhou, 510080, China. Key Laboratory of Tropical Disease Control, Ministry of Education, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, 510080, China. Provincial Engineering Technology Research Center for Biological Vector Control, Guangzhou, 510080, China.Zhongshan School of Medicine, Sun Yat-sen University, 74 2nd Zhongshan Road, Guangzhou, 510080, China. Key Laboratory of Tropical Disease Control, Ministry of Education, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, 510080, China. Provincial Engineering Technology Research Center for Biological Vector Control, Guangzhou, 510080, China.Zhongshan School of Medicine, Sun Yat-sen University, 74 2nd Zhongshan Road, Guangzhou, 510080, China. lvzhiyue@mail.sysu.edu.cn. Key Laboratory of Tropical Disease Control, Ministry of Education, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, 510080, China. lvzhiyue@mail.sysu.edu.cn. Provincial Engineering Technology Research Center for Biological Vector Control, Guangzhou, 510080, China. lvzhiyue@mail.sysu.edu.cn.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

28493001

Citation

Ji, Liu, et al. "Study On the Tolerance and Adaptation of Rats to Angiostrongylus Cantonensis Infection." Parasitology Research, vol. 116, no. 7, 2017, pp. 1937-1945.
Ji L, Yiyue X, Xujin H, et al. Study on the tolerance and adaptation of rats to Angiostrongylus cantonensis infection. Parasitol Res. 2017;116(7):1937-1945.
Ji, L., Yiyue, X., Xujin, H., Minghui, Z., Mengying, Z., Yue, H., Yanqi, W., Langui, S., Xin, Z., Datao, L., Shuo, W., Huanqin, Z., Zhongdao, W., & Zhiyue, L. (2017). Study on the tolerance and adaptation of rats to Angiostrongylus cantonensis infection. Parasitology Research, 116(7), 1937-1945. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00436-017-5472-4
Ji L, et al. Study On the Tolerance and Adaptation of Rats to Angiostrongylus Cantonensis Infection. Parasitol Res. 2017;116(7):1937-1945. PubMed PMID: 28493001.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Study on the tolerance and adaptation of rats to Angiostrongylus cantonensis infection. AU - Ji,Liu, AU - Yiyue,Xu, AU - Xujin,He, AU - Minghui,Zheng, AU - Mengying,Zhang, AU - Yue,Hu, AU - Yanqi,Wu, AU - Langui,Song, AU - Xin,Zeng, AU - Datao,Lin, AU - Shuo,Wan, AU - Huanqin,Zheng, AU - Zhongdao,Wu, AU - Zhiyue,Lv, Y1 - 2017/05/11/ PY - 2017/03/26/received PY - 2017/05/02/accepted PY - 2017/5/12/pubmed PY - 2017/11/7/medline PY - 2017/5/12/entrez KW - Adaptation KW - Angiostrongylus cantonensis KW - Rat KW - Tolerance SP - 1937 EP - 1945 JF - Parasitology research JO - Parasitol Res VL - 116 IS - 7 N2 - Angiostrongylus cantonensis (A. cantonensis) is the most common infectious agent causing eosinophilic meningitis. As an important food-borne parasitic disease, angiostrongyliasis cantonensis is an emerging infectious disease which brings severe harm to central nerve system of human. Rat, one of the few permissive hosts of A. cantonensis known to date, plays an indispensable role in the worm's life cycle. However, the tolerance and adaptation of rat to A. cantonensis infection is rarely understood. In this study, we infected rats with different numbers the third stage larvae (L3) of A. cantonensis and explored their tolerance through analysis on survival curve, neurological function score, and detection of pathological damages in organs including the brain, lung, and heart of the animals. Results indicated that rats' survival condition worsens, and body weight dropped more significantly as more worms were used for infection. Death appeared in groups infected with 80 and more A. cantonesnsis per rat. Morris water maze revealed that the neurological function of rats damaged gradually with increasing infection number of A. cantonensis larvae. When the number of infected parasite exceeded 240 per animal, rats showed significant neurological impairments. Collection of A. cantonensis from rat lung after 35 days of infection implied an upper limit for worm entry, and the average length of worm was inversely proportional to the infection amount, while the ratio between female and male worms was positively related to the infection number. The degree of pulmonary and cardiac inflammation was proportional to the infection number of A. cantonensis. Meanwhile, there existed considerable amount of adult worms in rat's right atrium and right ventricle, leading to a right heart myocardial inflammation. The present study firstly reports the tolerance and adaptation of rat, a permissive host of A. cantonensis to its infection, which will not only provide accurate technical parameters for maintaining A. cantonensis life cycle under laboratory conditions but also help unveil the underlying mechanism of the distinct pathological outcomes in the permissive and non-permissive hosts with A. cantonensis infection. SN - 1432-1955 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28493001/Study_on_the_tolerance_and_adaptation_of_rats_to_Angiostrongylus_cantonensis_infection_ L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00436-017-5472-4 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -