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Possible benefits of tomato juice consumption: a pilot study on irradiated human lymphocytes from healthy donors.
Nutr J 2017; 16(1):27NJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Reactive oxygen species (ROS) mediate much of the DNA damage caused by ionizing radiation. Among carotenoids, lycopene and β-carotene, present in tomato juice, are known to be strong radical scavengers. The aim of the study was to investigate the effect of tomato juice intake on the levels of DNA damage and oxidative stress in human whole blood induced by in vitro exposure to X-rays.

METHODS

Ten healthy adults were asked to drink 190 g of tomato juice, containing 17 mg lycopene and 0.25 mg β-carotene, per day for 3 weeks and then refrain from drinking it for 3 weeks. Peripheral whole blood samples were collected before and after the intake period of tomato juice and after the washout period. The blood samples were exposed in vitro to X-ray doses of 0, 0.1, 0.5, and 2 Gy. Cytogenetic damage was measured using the cytokinesis-block micronucleus (CBMN) assay and the dicentrics (DIC) assay. The level of oxidative stress was determined using serum 8-oxo-7, 8-dihydro-2-deoxyguanosine (8-oxo-dG) and plasma reactive oxygen metabolite-derived compounds (d-ROMs). The concentration of carotenoids in plasma was measured at the three time points.

RESULTS

The levels of 8-oxo-dG tended to decrease during the intake period and increase during the washout period. A non-significant inverse correlation was noted between the plasma concentration of lycopene plus β-carotene and the level of 8-oxo-dG (P = 0.064). The radiation-induced MN and DIC frequencies increased in a dose-dependent manner, and when compared at the same dose, the MN and DIC frequencies decreased during the intake period compared with those at baseline and then increased during the washout period. The results suggest that continuous tomato juice consumption non-significantly decreases extracellular 8-oxo-dG, d-ROMs, and MN. Tomato juice intake had minimal or no effect on radiation-induced 8-oxo-dG and d-ROMs. For most radiation doses, continuously tomato juice intake lowered the levels of MN and DIC.

CONCLUSION

Tomato juice consumption may suppress human lymphocyte DNA damage caused by radiation, but further examination is required.

TRIAL REGISTRATION

2014-001 and 2014-R06.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Radiological Life Sciences, Division of Medical Life Sciences, Hirosaki University Graduate School of Health Sciences, Aomori, 036-8564, Japan.Department of Disability and Health, Division of Medical Life Sciences, Hirosaki University Graduate School of Health Sciences, Aomori, 036-8564, Japan.Department of Clinical Laboratory Medicine, Hirosaki Central Hospital, Aomori, 036-8188, Japan.Department of Clinical Laboratory Medicine, Hirosaki Central Hospital, Aomori, 036-8188, Japan.Nature and Wellness Research Department, Innovation Division, KAGOME CO., LTD., Tochigi, 329-2762, Japan.Nature and Wellness Research Department, Innovation Division, KAGOME CO., LTD., Tochigi, 329-2762, Japan.Nature and Wellness Research Department, Innovation Division, KAGOME CO., LTD., Tochigi, 329-2762, Japan.Department of Pathologic Analysis, Division of Medical Life Sciences, Hirosaki University Graduate School of Health Sciences, Aomori, 036-8564, Japan.Department of Radiological Life Sciences, Division of Medical Life Sciences, Hirosaki University Graduate School of Health Sciences, Aomori, 036-8564, Japan. mariya@hirosaki-u.ac.jp.Center for Radiation Protection Research, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute, Stockholm University, Stockholm, SE-106 91, Sweden.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

28494764

Citation

Nakamura, Ayumi, et al. "Possible Benefits of Tomato Juice Consumption: a Pilot Study On Irradiated Human Lymphocytes From Healthy Donors." Nutrition Journal, vol. 16, no. 1, 2017, p. 27.
Nakamura A, Itaki C, Saito A, et al. Possible benefits of tomato juice consumption: a pilot study on irradiated human lymphocytes from healthy donors. Nutr J. 2017;16(1):27.
Nakamura, A., Itaki, C., Saito, A., Yonezawa, T., Aizawa, K., Hirai, A., ... Haghdoost, S. (2017). Possible benefits of tomato juice consumption: a pilot study on irradiated human lymphocytes from healthy donors. Nutrition Journal, 16(1), p. 27. doi:10.1186/s12937-017-0248-3.
Nakamura A, et al. Possible Benefits of Tomato Juice Consumption: a Pilot Study On Irradiated Human Lymphocytes From Healthy Donors. Nutr J. 2017 May 12;16(1):27. PubMed PMID: 28494764.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Possible benefits of tomato juice consumption: a pilot study on irradiated human lymphocytes from healthy donors. AU - Nakamura,Ayumi, AU - Itaki,Chieko, AU - Saito,Ayako, AU - Yonezawa,Toko, AU - Aizawa,Koichi, AU - Hirai,Ayumi, AU - Suganuma,Hiroyuki, AU - Miura,Tomisato, AU - Mariya,Yasushi, AU - Haghdoost,Siamak, Y1 - 2017/05/12/ PY - 2016/08/22/received PY - 2017/05/01/accepted PY - 2017/5/13/entrez PY - 2017/5/13/pubmed PY - 2018/4/13/medline KW - Human lymphocytes KW - Lycopene KW - Radioprotective effect KW - Reactive oxygen species KW - Tomato juice KW - β-carotene SP - 27 EP - 27 JF - Nutrition journal JO - Nutr J VL - 16 IS - 1 N2 - BACKGROUND: Reactive oxygen species (ROS) mediate much of the DNA damage caused by ionizing radiation. Among carotenoids, lycopene and β-carotene, present in tomato juice, are known to be strong radical scavengers. The aim of the study was to investigate the effect of tomato juice intake on the levels of DNA damage and oxidative stress in human whole blood induced by in vitro exposure to X-rays. METHODS: Ten healthy adults were asked to drink 190 g of tomato juice, containing 17 mg lycopene and 0.25 mg β-carotene, per day for 3 weeks and then refrain from drinking it for 3 weeks. Peripheral whole blood samples were collected before and after the intake period of tomato juice and after the washout period. The blood samples were exposed in vitro to X-ray doses of 0, 0.1, 0.5, and 2 Gy. Cytogenetic damage was measured using the cytokinesis-block micronucleus (CBMN) assay and the dicentrics (DIC) assay. The level of oxidative stress was determined using serum 8-oxo-7, 8-dihydro-2-deoxyguanosine (8-oxo-dG) and plasma reactive oxygen metabolite-derived compounds (d-ROMs). The concentration of carotenoids in plasma was measured at the three time points. RESULTS: The levels of 8-oxo-dG tended to decrease during the intake period and increase during the washout period. A non-significant inverse correlation was noted between the plasma concentration of lycopene plus β-carotene and the level of 8-oxo-dG (P = 0.064). The radiation-induced MN and DIC frequencies increased in a dose-dependent manner, and when compared at the same dose, the MN and DIC frequencies decreased during the intake period compared with those at baseline and then increased during the washout period. The results suggest that continuous tomato juice consumption non-significantly decreases extracellular 8-oxo-dG, d-ROMs, and MN. Tomato juice intake had minimal or no effect on radiation-induced 8-oxo-dG and d-ROMs. For most radiation doses, continuously tomato juice intake lowered the levels of MN and DIC. CONCLUSION: Tomato juice consumption may suppress human lymphocyte DNA damage caused by radiation, but further examination is required. TRIAL REGISTRATION: 2014-001 and 2014-R06. SN - 1475-2891 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28494764/Possible_benefits_of_tomato_juice_consumption:_a_pilot_study_on_irradiated_human_lymphocytes_from_healthy_donors_ L2 - https://nutritionj.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12937-017-0248-3 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -