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Evaluating biomechanics of user-selected sitting and standing computer workstation.
Appl Ergon. 2017 Nov; 65:382-388.AE

Abstract

A standing computer workstation has now become a popular modern work place intervention to reduce sedentary behavior at work. However, user's interaction related to a standing computer workstation and its differences with a sitting workstation need to be understood to assist in developing recommendations for use and set up. The study compared the differences in upper extremity posture and muscle activity between user-selected sitting and standing workstation setups. Twenty participants (10 females, 10 males) volunteered for the study. 3-D posture, surface electromyography, and user-reported discomfort were measured while completing simulated tasks with each participant's self-selected workstation setups. Sitting computer workstation associated with more non-neutral shoulder postures and greater shoulder muscle activity, while standing computer workstation induced greater wrist adduction angle and greater extensor carpi radialis muscle activity. Sitting computer workstation also associated with greater shoulder abduction postural variation (90th-10th percentile) while standing computer workstation associated with greater variation for should rotation and wrist extension. Users reported similar overall discomfort levels within the first 10 min of work but had more than twice as much discomfort while standing than sitting after 45 min; with most discomfort reported in the low back for standing and shoulder for sitting. These different measures provide understanding in users' different interactions with sitting and standing and by alternating between the two configurations in short bouts may be a way of changing the loading pattern on the upper extremity.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Environmental Health, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, 677 Huntington Avenue, Boston, MA 02115, USA.Department of Physical Therapy Movement and Rehabilitation Sciences, Bouvé College of Health Sciences, Northeastern University, 360 Huntington Avenue, Boston, MA 02115, USA.Department of Environmental Health, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, 677 Huntington Avenue, Boston, MA 02115, USA; Department of Physical Therapy Movement and Rehabilitation Sciences, Bouvé College of Health Sciences, Northeastern University, 360 Huntington Avenue, Boston, MA 02115, USA. Electronic address: j.dennerlein@northeastern.edu.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial

Language

eng

PubMed ID

28499555

Citation

Lin, Michael Y., et al. "Evaluating Biomechanics of User-selected Sitting and Standing Computer Workstation." Applied Ergonomics, vol. 65, 2017, pp. 382-388.
Lin MY, Barbir A, Dennerlein JT. Evaluating biomechanics of user-selected sitting and standing computer workstation. Appl Ergon. 2017;65:382-388.
Lin, M. Y., Barbir, A., & Dennerlein, J. T. (2017). Evaluating biomechanics of user-selected sitting and standing computer workstation. Applied Ergonomics, 65, 382-388. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.apergo.2017.04.006
Lin MY, Barbir A, Dennerlein JT. Evaluating Biomechanics of User-selected Sitting and Standing Computer Workstation. Appl Ergon. 2017;65:382-388. PubMed PMID: 28499555.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Evaluating biomechanics of user-selected sitting and standing computer workstation. AU - Lin,Michael Y, AU - Barbir,Ana, AU - Dennerlein,Jack T, Y1 - 2017/05/09/ PY - 2016/05/10/received PY - 2017/02/12/revised PY - 2017/04/08/accepted PY - 2017/5/14/pubmed PY - 2018/5/10/medline PY - 2017/5/14/entrez KW - Musculoskeletal disorders KW - Office work KW - Workstation SP - 382 EP - 388 JF - Applied ergonomics JO - Appl Ergon VL - 65 N2 - A standing computer workstation has now become a popular modern work place intervention to reduce sedentary behavior at work. However, user's interaction related to a standing computer workstation and its differences with a sitting workstation need to be understood to assist in developing recommendations for use and set up. The study compared the differences in upper extremity posture and muscle activity between user-selected sitting and standing workstation setups. Twenty participants (10 females, 10 males) volunteered for the study. 3-D posture, surface electromyography, and user-reported discomfort were measured while completing simulated tasks with each participant's self-selected workstation setups. Sitting computer workstation associated with more non-neutral shoulder postures and greater shoulder muscle activity, while standing computer workstation induced greater wrist adduction angle and greater extensor carpi radialis muscle activity. Sitting computer workstation also associated with greater shoulder abduction postural variation (90th-10th percentile) while standing computer workstation associated with greater variation for should rotation and wrist extension. Users reported similar overall discomfort levels within the first 10 min of work but had more than twice as much discomfort while standing than sitting after 45 min; with most discomfort reported in the low back for standing and shoulder for sitting. These different measures provide understanding in users' different interactions with sitting and standing and by alternating between the two configurations in short bouts may be a way of changing the loading pattern on the upper extremity. SN - 1872-9126 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28499555/Evaluating_biomechanics_of_user_selected_sitting_and_standing_computer_workstation_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0003-6870(17)30092-3 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -