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Trends in racial/ethnic disparities of new AIDS diagnoses in the United States, 1984-2013.
Ann Epidemiol. 2017 05; 27(5):329-334.e2.AE

Abstract

PURPOSE

In the United States, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) disproportionately impacts racial/ethnic minorities. We describe and evaluate trends in the Black-White and Hispanic-White disparities of new AIDS diagnoses from 1984 to 2013 in the United States.

METHODS

AIDS diagnosis rates by race/ethnicity for people ≥13 years were calculated using national HIV surveillance and Census data. Black-White and Hispanic-White disparities were measured as rate ratios. Joinpoint Regression was used to identify time periods across which to estimate rate-ratio trends. We calculated the estimated annual percent change in disparities for each time period using log-normal linear regression modeling.

RESULTS

Black-White disparity increased from 1984 to 1990, followed by a large increase from 1991 to 1996, and a smaller increase from 1997 to 2001. Black-White disparity moderated from 2002 to 2005 and rose again from 2006 to 2013. Hispanic-White disparity increased from 1984 to 1997 but declined after 1998. Black-White and Hispanic-White disparities increased for men who have sex with men during 2008 to 2013.

CONCLUSIONS

Recent increases in racial/ethnic disparities of AIDS diagnoses were observed and may be due in part to care continuum inequalities. We suggest assessing disparities in AIDS diagnoses as a high-level measure to capture changes at multiple stages of the care continuum collectively. Future research should examine determinants of racial/ethnic differences at each step of the continuum to better identify characteristics driving disparities.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Epidemiology, Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University, Atlanta, GA. Electronic address: jchapi2@emory.edu.Department of Epidemiology, Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University, Atlanta, GA.Department of Epidemiology, Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University, Atlanta, GA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

28506566

Citation

Chapin-Bardales, Johanna, et al. "Trends in Racial/ethnic Disparities of New AIDS Diagnoses in the United States, 1984-2013." Annals of Epidemiology, vol. 27, no. 5, 2017, pp. 329-334.e2.
Chapin-Bardales J, Rosenberg ES, Sullivan PS. Trends in racial/ethnic disparities of new AIDS diagnoses in the United States, 1984-2013. Ann Epidemiol. 2017;27(5):329-334.e2.
Chapin-Bardales, J., Rosenberg, E. S., & Sullivan, P. S. (2017). Trends in racial/ethnic disparities of new AIDS diagnoses in the United States, 1984-2013. Annals of Epidemiology, 27(5), 329-e2. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.annepidem.2017.04.002
Chapin-Bardales J, Rosenberg ES, Sullivan PS. Trends in Racial/ethnic Disparities of New AIDS Diagnoses in the United States, 1984-2013. Ann Epidemiol. 2017;27(5):329-334.e2. PubMed PMID: 28506566.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Trends in racial/ethnic disparities of new AIDS diagnoses in the United States, 1984-2013. AU - Chapin-Bardales,Johanna, AU - Rosenberg,Eli Samuel, AU - Sullivan,Patrick Sean, Y1 - 2017/04/21/ PY - 2017/03/25/received PY - 2017/04/12/accepted PY - 2017/5/17/pubmed PY - 2018/3/22/medline PY - 2017/5/17/entrez KW - AIDS KW - Care KW - Disparities KW - HIV KW - Racial/ethnic KW - Trends SP - 329 EP - 334.e2 JF - Annals of epidemiology JO - Ann Epidemiol VL - 27 IS - 5 N2 - PURPOSE: In the United States, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) disproportionately impacts racial/ethnic minorities. We describe and evaluate trends in the Black-White and Hispanic-White disparities of new AIDS diagnoses from 1984 to 2013 in the United States. METHODS: AIDS diagnosis rates by race/ethnicity for people ≥13 years were calculated using national HIV surveillance and Census data. Black-White and Hispanic-White disparities were measured as rate ratios. Joinpoint Regression was used to identify time periods across which to estimate rate-ratio trends. We calculated the estimated annual percent change in disparities for each time period using log-normal linear regression modeling. RESULTS: Black-White disparity increased from 1984 to 1990, followed by a large increase from 1991 to 1996, and a smaller increase from 1997 to 2001. Black-White disparity moderated from 2002 to 2005 and rose again from 2006 to 2013. Hispanic-White disparity increased from 1984 to 1997 but declined after 1998. Black-White and Hispanic-White disparities increased for men who have sex with men during 2008 to 2013. CONCLUSIONS: Recent increases in racial/ethnic disparities of AIDS diagnoses were observed and may be due in part to care continuum inequalities. We suggest assessing disparities in AIDS diagnoses as a high-level measure to capture changes at multiple stages of the care continuum collectively. Future research should examine determinants of racial/ethnic differences at each step of the continuum to better identify characteristics driving disparities. SN - 1873-2585 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28506566/Trends_in_racial/ethnic_disparities_of_new_AIDS_diagnoses_in_the_United_States_1984_2013_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1047-2797(17)30068-6 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -