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Influence of Diet in Multiple Sclerosis: A Systematic Review.

Abstract

Nutrition is considered to be a possible factor in the pathogenesis of the neurological disease multiple sclerosis (MS). Nutrition intervention studies suggest that diet may be considered as a complementary treatment to control the progression of the disease; a systematic review of the literature on the influence of diet on MS was therefore conducted. The literature search was conducted by using Medlars Online International Literature (MEDLINE) via PubMed and Scopus. Forty-seven articles met the inclusion criteria. The reviewed articles assessed the relations between macro- and micronutrient intakes and MS incidence. The patients involved used alternative therapies (homeopathy), protocolized diets that included particular foods (herbal products such as grape seed extract, ginseng, blueberries, green tea, etc.), or dietary supplements such as vitamin D, carnitine, melatonin, or coenzyme Q10. Current studies suggest that high serum concentrations of vitamin D, a potent immunomodulator, may decrease the risk of MS and the risk of relapse and new lesions, while improving brain lesions and timed tandem walking. Experimental evidence suggests that serum vitamin D concentration is lower during MS relapses than in remission and is associated with a greater degree of disability [Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) score >3]. The findings suggest that circulating vitamin D concentrations can be considered a biomarker of MS and supplemental vitamin D can be used therapeutically. Other studies point to a negative correlation between serum vitamin B-12 concentrations and EDSS score. Vitamin B-12 has fundamental roles in central nervous system function, especially in the methionine synthase-mediated conversion of homocysteine to methionine, which is essential for DNA and RNA synthesis. Therefore, vitamin B-12 deficiency may lead to an increase in the concentration of homocysteine. Further research is clearly necessary to determine whether treatment with vitamin B-12 supplements delays MS progression.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Department Science and Technology and Genetics Agroforestal, University of Castilla La-Mancha, Campus Universitario, Albacete, Spain.

    ,

    Department of Food Science, Regional Campus of International Excellence "Campus Mare Nostrum," University of Murcia, Murcia, Spain. CIBEROBN CB12/03/30038 (Physiopathology of Obesity and Nutrition), Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Madrid, Spain; and.

    ,

    Department of Food Science, Regional Campus of International Excellence "Campus Mare Nostrum," University of Murcia, Murcia, Spain. CIBEROBN CB12/03/30038 (Physiopathology of Obesity and Nutrition), Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Madrid, Spain; and.

    ,

    CIBEROBN CB12/03/30038 (Physiopathology of Obesity and Nutrition), Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Madrid, Spain; and. Research Group on Community Nutrition and Oxidative Stress, University of the Balearic Islands, Palma de Mallorca, Spain.

    ,

    CIBEROBN CB12/03/30038 (Physiopathology of Obesity and Nutrition), Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Madrid, Spain; and. Research Group on Community Nutrition and Oxidative Stress, University of the Balearic Islands, Palma de Mallorca, Spain.

    ,

    Department Science and Technology and Genetics Agroforestal, University of Castilla La-Mancha, Campus Universitario, Albacete, Spain.

    Department of Food Science, Regional Campus of International Excellence "Campus Mare Nostrum," University of Murcia, Murcia, Spain; mmtome@um.es. CIBEROBN CB12/03/30038 (Physiopathology of Obesity and Nutrition), Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Madrid, Spain; and.

    Source

    MeSH

    Diet
    Dietary Supplements
    Disease Progression
    Humans
    Multiple Sclerosis
    Nutritional Status
    Vitamin B 12
    Vitamin B 12 Deficiency
    Vitamin D
    Vitamin D Deficiency
    Vitamins

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Review
    Systematic Review

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    28507011

    Citation

    Bagur, M José, et al. "Influence of Diet in Multiple Sclerosis: a Systematic Review." Advances in Nutrition (Bethesda, Md.), vol. 8, no. 3, 2017, pp. 463-472.
    Bagur MJ, Murcia MA, Jiménez-Monreal AM, et al. Influence of Diet in Multiple Sclerosis: A Systematic Review. Adv Nutr. 2017;8(3):463-472.
    Bagur, M. J., Murcia, M. A., Jiménez-Monreal, A. M., Tur, J. A., Bibiloni, M. M., Alonso, G. L., & Martínez-Tomé, M. (2017). Influence of Diet in Multiple Sclerosis: A Systematic Review. Advances in Nutrition (Bethesda, Md.), 8(3), pp. 463-472. doi:10.3945/an.116.014191.
    Bagur MJ, et al. Influence of Diet in Multiple Sclerosis: a Systematic Review. Adv Nutr. 2017;8(3):463-472. PubMed PMID: 28507011.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Influence of Diet in Multiple Sclerosis: A Systematic Review. AU - Bagur,M José, AU - Murcia,M Antonia, AU - Jiménez-Monreal,Antonia M, AU - Tur,Josep A, AU - Bibiloni,M Mar, AU - Alonso,Gonzalo L, AU - Martínez-Tomé,Magdalena, Y1 - 2017/05/15/ PY - 2017/5/17/entrez PY - 2017/5/17/pubmed PY - 2018/2/3/medline KW - diet KW - food KW - intake KW - multiple sclerosis KW - nutrition KW - systematic review SP - 463 EP - 472 JF - Advances in nutrition (Bethesda, Md.) JO - Adv Nutr VL - 8 IS - 3 N2 - Nutrition is considered to be a possible factor in the pathogenesis of the neurological disease multiple sclerosis (MS). Nutrition intervention studies suggest that diet may be considered as a complementary treatment to control the progression of the disease; a systematic review of the literature on the influence of diet on MS was therefore conducted. The literature search was conducted by using Medlars Online International Literature (MEDLINE) via PubMed and Scopus. Forty-seven articles met the inclusion criteria. The reviewed articles assessed the relations between macro- and micronutrient intakes and MS incidence. The patients involved used alternative therapies (homeopathy), protocolized diets that included particular foods (herbal products such as grape seed extract, ginseng, blueberries, green tea, etc.), or dietary supplements such as vitamin D, carnitine, melatonin, or coenzyme Q10. Current studies suggest that high serum concentrations of vitamin D, a potent immunomodulator, may decrease the risk of MS and the risk of relapse and new lesions, while improving brain lesions and timed tandem walking. Experimental evidence suggests that serum vitamin D concentration is lower during MS relapses than in remission and is associated with a greater degree of disability [Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) score >3]. The findings suggest that circulating vitamin D concentrations can be considered a biomarker of MS and supplemental vitamin D can be used therapeutically. Other studies point to a negative correlation between serum vitamin B-12 concentrations and EDSS score. Vitamin B-12 has fundamental roles in central nervous system function, especially in the methionine synthase-mediated conversion of homocysteine to methionine, which is essential for DNA and RNA synthesis. Therefore, vitamin B-12 deficiency may lead to an increase in the concentration of homocysteine. Further research is clearly necessary to determine whether treatment with vitamin B-12 supplements delays MS progression. SN - 2156-5376 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28507011/Influence_of_Diet_in_Multiple_Sclerosis:_A_Systematic_Review_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/advances/article-lookup/doi/10.3945/an.116.014191 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -