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Compact Eucapnic Voluntary Hyperpnoea Apparatus for Exercise-Induced Respiratory Disease Detection.
Sensors (Basel). 2017 May 16; 17(5)S

Abstract

Eucapnic voluntary hyperpnoea (EVH) challenge provides objective criteria for exercise-induced asthma (EIA) or exercise-induced bronchoconstriction (EIB), and it was recommended to justify the use of inhaled β₂-agonists by athletes for the Olympics. This paper presents the development of a compact and easy-to-use EVH apparatus for assessing EIB in human subjects. The compact apparatus has been validated on human subjects and the results have been compared to the conventional EVH system. Twenty-two swimmers, including eleven healthy subjects and eleven subjects who had been physician-diagnosed with asthma, were recruited from sport and recreation centers throughout Auckland, New Zealand. Each subject performed two EVH challenge tests using the proposed breathing apparatus and the conventional Phillips EVH apparatus on separate days, respectively. Forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV₁) was measured before and after the challenges. A reduction in FEV₁ of 10% or more was considered positive. Of the eleven subjects who were previously diagnosed with asthma, EIB was present in all subjects (100%) in the compact EVH group, while it was presented in ten subjects (90.91%) in the conventional EVH challenge group. Of the eleven healthy subjects, EIB was present in one subject (4.55%) in the compact EVH group, while it was not present in the conventional EVH group. Experimental results showed that the compact EVH system has potential to become an alternative tool for EIB detection.

Authors+Show Affiliations

School of Instrument Science and Opto-Electronics Engineering, Hefei University of Technology, Hefei 230009, China. luluwang2015@hfut.edu.cn.Institute of Biomedical Technologies, Auckland University of Technology, Auckland 1142, New Zealand. ahmed.aljumaily@aut.ac.nz.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

28509868

Citation

Wang, Lulu, and Ahmed Al-Jumaily. "Compact Eucapnic Voluntary Hyperpnoea Apparatus for Exercise-Induced Respiratory Disease Detection." Sensors (Basel, Switzerland), vol. 17, no. 5, 2017.
Wang L, Al-Jumaily A. Compact Eucapnic Voluntary Hyperpnoea Apparatus for Exercise-Induced Respiratory Disease Detection. Sensors (Basel). 2017;17(5).
Wang, L., & Al-Jumaily, A. (2017). Compact Eucapnic Voluntary Hyperpnoea Apparatus for Exercise-Induced Respiratory Disease Detection. Sensors (Basel, Switzerland), 17(5). https://doi.org/10.3390/s17051139
Wang L, Al-Jumaily A. Compact Eucapnic Voluntary Hyperpnoea Apparatus for Exercise-Induced Respiratory Disease Detection. Sensors (Basel). 2017 May 16;17(5) PubMed PMID: 28509868.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Compact Eucapnic Voluntary Hyperpnoea Apparatus for Exercise-Induced Respiratory Disease Detection. AU - Wang,Lulu, AU - Al-Jumaily,Ahmed, Y1 - 2017/05/16/ PY - 2017/04/03/received PY - 2017/05/03/revised PY - 2017/05/11/accepted PY - 2017/5/17/entrez PY - 2017/5/17/pubmed PY - 2018/5/18/medline KW - bronchoprovocation technique KW - eucapnic voluntary hyperpnoea KW - eucapnic voluntary hyperventilation KW - exercise-induced asthma KW - exercise-induced bronchoconstriction KW - maximum voluntary ventilation JF - Sensors (Basel, Switzerland) JO - Sensors (Basel) VL - 17 IS - 5 N2 - Eucapnic voluntary hyperpnoea (EVH) challenge provides objective criteria for exercise-induced asthma (EIA) or exercise-induced bronchoconstriction (EIB), and it was recommended to justify the use of inhaled β₂-agonists by athletes for the Olympics. This paper presents the development of a compact and easy-to-use EVH apparatus for assessing EIB in human subjects. The compact apparatus has been validated on human subjects and the results have been compared to the conventional EVH system. Twenty-two swimmers, including eleven healthy subjects and eleven subjects who had been physician-diagnosed with asthma, were recruited from sport and recreation centers throughout Auckland, New Zealand. Each subject performed two EVH challenge tests using the proposed breathing apparatus and the conventional Phillips EVH apparatus on separate days, respectively. Forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV₁) was measured before and after the challenges. A reduction in FEV₁ of 10% or more was considered positive. Of the eleven subjects who were previously diagnosed with asthma, EIB was present in all subjects (100%) in the compact EVH group, while it was presented in ten subjects (90.91%) in the conventional EVH challenge group. Of the eleven healthy subjects, EIB was present in one subject (4.55%) in the compact EVH group, while it was not present in the conventional EVH group. Experimental results showed that the compact EVH system has potential to become an alternative tool for EIB detection. SN - 1424-8220 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28509868/Compact_Eucapnic_Voluntary_Hyperpnoea_Apparatus_for_Exercise_Induced_Respiratory_Disease_Detection_ L2 - http://www.mdpi.com/resolver?pii=s17051139 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -