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Resistant pathogens as causes of traveller's diarrhea globally and impact(s) on treatment failure and recommendations.
J Travel Med. 2017 Apr 01; 24(suppl_1):S6-S12.JT

Abstract

Background

: Diarrhea is a frequent clinical syndrome affecting international travellers. Bacterial etiologic agents have a long history of emergent antimicrobial resistance against commonly used antibiotics. Current approaches applying first-line antimicrobial therapy are being challenged by increasingly resistant organisms. This review summarizes recent epidemiological and clinical evidence of antibiotic resistance among enteropathogens causing traveller's diarrhea and the subsequent impact on current treatment recommendations.

Methods

: The PubMed database was systemically searched for articles related to antibiotic susceptibility and diarrheal pathogens.

Results

: Antibiotic resistance related to travellers' diarrhea has increased in recent years. Most notably, fluoroquinolone resistance has expanded from the Campylobacter -associated cases well documented in Southeast Asia in the 1990s to widespread occurrence, as well as increases among other common bacterial enteropathogens including, enterotoxigenic and enteroaggregative Escherichia coli , Shigella and non-typhoidal Salmonella . Multidrug resistance among enteropathogenic Enterobacteriacae and Campylobacter species create further challenges with the selection of empiric therapy. Treatment failures requiring early use of alternative agents, as well as delayed recovery comparable to placebo rates emphasize the impact of antimicrobial resistance on effective treatment.

Conclusions

: Although there are limitations in the available data, the increasing antibiotic resistance and adverse impact on clinical outcome require continued surveillance and reconsideration of practice guidelines.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Infectious Disease Clinical Research Program, Department of Preventive Medicine and Biostatistics, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, 4301 Jones Bridge Road, Bethesda, MD 20814-5119, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

28520997

Citation

Tribble, David R.. "Resistant Pathogens as Causes of Traveller's Diarrhea Globally and Impact(s) On Treatment Failure and Recommendations." Journal of Travel Medicine, vol. 24, no. suppl_1, 2017, pp. S6-S12.
Tribble DR. Resistant pathogens as causes of traveller's diarrhea globally and impact(s) on treatment failure and recommendations. J Travel Med. 2017;24(suppl_1):S6-S12.
Tribble, D. R. (2017). Resistant pathogens as causes of traveller's diarrhea globally and impact(s) on treatment failure and recommendations. Journal of Travel Medicine, 24(suppl_1), S6-S12. https://doi.org/10.1093/jtm/taw090
Tribble DR. Resistant Pathogens as Causes of Traveller's Diarrhea Globally and Impact(s) On Treatment Failure and Recommendations. J Travel Med. 2017 Apr 1;24(suppl_1):S6-S12. PubMed PMID: 28520997.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Resistant pathogens as causes of traveller's diarrhea globally and impact(s) on treatment failure and recommendations. A1 - Tribble,David R, PY - 2016/11/23/accepted PY - 2017/5/19/entrez PY - 2017/5/19/pubmed PY - 2018/2/27/medline KW - Campylobacter KW - Enterotoxigenic E. coli KW - Salmonella KW - Shigella KW - Traveller’s diarrhea KW - antimicrobial resistance SP - S6 EP - S12 JF - Journal of travel medicine JO - J Travel Med VL - 24 IS - suppl_1 N2 - Background: : Diarrhea is a frequent clinical syndrome affecting international travellers. Bacterial etiologic agents have a long history of emergent antimicrobial resistance against commonly used antibiotics. Current approaches applying first-line antimicrobial therapy are being challenged by increasingly resistant organisms. This review summarizes recent epidemiological and clinical evidence of antibiotic resistance among enteropathogens causing traveller's diarrhea and the subsequent impact on current treatment recommendations. Methods: : The PubMed database was systemically searched for articles related to antibiotic susceptibility and diarrheal pathogens. Results: : Antibiotic resistance related to travellers' diarrhea has increased in recent years. Most notably, fluoroquinolone resistance has expanded from the Campylobacter -associated cases well documented in Southeast Asia in the 1990s to widespread occurrence, as well as increases among other common bacterial enteropathogens including, enterotoxigenic and enteroaggregative Escherichia coli , Shigella and non-typhoidal Salmonella . Multidrug resistance among enteropathogenic Enterobacteriacae and Campylobacter species create further challenges with the selection of empiric therapy. Treatment failures requiring early use of alternative agents, as well as delayed recovery comparable to placebo rates emphasize the impact of antimicrobial resistance on effective treatment. Conclusions: : Although there are limitations in the available data, the increasing antibiotic resistance and adverse impact on clinical outcome require continued surveillance and reconsideration of practice guidelines. SN - 1708-8305 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28520997/full_citation L2 - https://academic.oup.com/jtm/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/jtm/taw090 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -