Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

An appraisal of Indonesia's immense peat carbon stock using national peatland maps: uncertainties and potential losses from conversion.
Carbon Balance Manag. 2017 Dec; 12(1):12.CB

Abstract

BACKGROUND

A large proportion of the world's tropical peatlands occur in Indonesia where rapid conversion and associated losses of carbon, biodiversity and ecosystem services have brought peatland management to the forefront of Indonesia's climate mitigation efforts. We evaluated peat volume from two commonly referenced maps of peat distribution and depth published by Wetlands International (WI) and the Indonesian Ministry of Agriculture (MoA), and used regionally specific values of carbon density to calculate carbon stocks.

RESULTS

Peatland extent and volume published in the MoA maps are lower than those in the WI maps, resulting in lower estimates of carbon storage. We estimate Indonesia's total peat carbon store to be within 13.6 GtC (the low MoA map estimate) and 40.5 GtC (the high WI map estimate) with a best estimate of 28.1 GtC: the midpoint of medium carbon stock estimates derived from WI (30.8 GtC) and MoA (25.3 GtC) maps. This estimate is about half of previous assessments which used an assumed average value of peat thickness for all Indonesian peatlands, and revises the current global tropical peat carbon pool to 75 GtC. Yet, these results do not diminish the significance of Indonesia's peatlands, which store an estimated 30% more carbon than the biomass of all Indonesian forests. The largest discrepancy between maps is for the Papua province, which accounts for 62-71% of the overall differences in peat area, volume and carbon storage. According to the MoA map, 80% of Indonesian peatlands are <300 cm thick and thus vulnerable to conversion outside of protected areas according to environmental regulations. The carbon contained in these shallower peatlands is conservatively estimated to be 10.6 GtC, equivalent to 42% of Indonesia's total peat carbon and about 12 years of global emissions from land use change at current rates.

CONCLUSIONS

Considering the high uncertainties in peatland extent, volume and carbon storage revealed in this assessment of current maps, a systematic revision of Indonesia's peat maps to produce a single geospatial reference that is universally accepted would improve national peat carbon storage estimates and greatly benefit carbon cycle research, land use management and spatial planning.

Authors+Show Affiliations

USDA Forest Service, Northern Research Station, 271 Mast Rd., Durham, NH, 03824, USA. mwwarren@fs.fed.us.Center for International Forestry Research, CIFOR c/o Centro Internacional de la Papa (CIP), Av. La Molina 1895, La Molina, Apdo postal 1558, 15024 , Lima, Peru.Center for International Forestry Research, Jl. CIFOR, Situgede, Bogor, 16115, Indonesia. Department of Fisheries and Wildlife, Oregon State University, 104 Nash Hall, Corvallis, OR, 97331, USA.Center for International Forestry Research, Jl. CIFOR, Situgede, Bogor, 16115, Indonesia. Department of Geophysics and Meteorology, Bogor Agricultural University, Kampus Darmaga, Bogor, 16680, Indonesia.USDA Forest Service, Northern Research Station, 1831 Hwy 169 East, Grand Rapids, MN, 55744, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

28527145

Citation

Warren, Matthew, et al. "An Appraisal of Indonesia's Immense Peat Carbon Stock Using National Peatland Maps: Uncertainties and Potential Losses From Conversion." Carbon Balance and Management, vol. 12, no. 1, 2017, p. 12.
Warren M, Hergoualc'h K, Kauffman JB, et al. An appraisal of Indonesia's immense peat carbon stock using national peatland maps: uncertainties and potential losses from conversion. Carbon Balance Manag. 2017;12(1):12.
Warren, M., Hergoualc'h, K., Kauffman, J. B., Murdiyarso, D., & Kolka, R. (2017). An appraisal of Indonesia's immense peat carbon stock using national peatland maps: uncertainties and potential losses from conversion. Carbon Balance and Management, 12(1), 12. https://doi.org/10.1186/s13021-017-0080-2
Warren M, et al. An Appraisal of Indonesia's Immense Peat Carbon Stock Using National Peatland Maps: Uncertainties and Potential Losses From Conversion. Carbon Balance Manag. 2017;12(1):12. PubMed PMID: 28527145.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - An appraisal of Indonesia's immense peat carbon stock using national peatland maps: uncertainties and potential losses from conversion. AU - Warren,Matthew, AU - Hergoualc'h,Kristell, AU - Kauffman,J Boone, AU - Murdiyarso,Daniel, AU - Kolka,Randall, Y1 - 2017/05/19/ PY - 2017/01/12/received PY - 2017/05/09/accepted PY - 2017/5/21/entrez PY - 2017/5/21/pubmed PY - 2017/5/21/medline KW - Carbon emissions KW - Carbon pools KW - Climate change mitigation KW - Peat degradation KW - Tropical peatlands KW - Wetlands SP - 12 EP - 12 JF - Carbon balance and management JO - Carbon Balance Manag VL - 12 IS - 1 N2 - BACKGROUND: A large proportion of the world's tropical peatlands occur in Indonesia where rapid conversion and associated losses of carbon, biodiversity and ecosystem services have brought peatland management to the forefront of Indonesia's climate mitigation efforts. We evaluated peat volume from two commonly referenced maps of peat distribution and depth published by Wetlands International (WI) and the Indonesian Ministry of Agriculture (MoA), and used regionally specific values of carbon density to calculate carbon stocks. RESULTS: Peatland extent and volume published in the MoA maps are lower than those in the WI maps, resulting in lower estimates of carbon storage. We estimate Indonesia's total peat carbon store to be within 13.6 GtC (the low MoA map estimate) and 40.5 GtC (the high WI map estimate) with a best estimate of 28.1 GtC: the midpoint of medium carbon stock estimates derived from WI (30.8 GtC) and MoA (25.3 GtC) maps. This estimate is about half of previous assessments which used an assumed average value of peat thickness for all Indonesian peatlands, and revises the current global tropical peat carbon pool to 75 GtC. Yet, these results do not diminish the significance of Indonesia's peatlands, which store an estimated 30% more carbon than the biomass of all Indonesian forests. The largest discrepancy between maps is for the Papua province, which accounts for 62-71% of the overall differences in peat area, volume and carbon storage. According to the MoA map, 80% of Indonesian peatlands are <300 cm thick and thus vulnerable to conversion outside of protected areas according to environmental regulations. The carbon contained in these shallower peatlands is conservatively estimated to be 10.6 GtC, equivalent to 42% of Indonesia's total peat carbon and about 12 years of global emissions from land use change at current rates. CONCLUSIONS: Considering the high uncertainties in peatland extent, volume and carbon storage revealed in this assessment of current maps, a systematic revision of Indonesia's peat maps to produce a single geospatial reference that is universally accepted would improve national peat carbon storage estimates and greatly benefit carbon cycle research, land use management and spatial planning. SN - 1750-0680 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28527145/An_appraisal_of_Indonesia's_immense_peat_carbon_stock_using_national_peatland_maps:_uncertainties_and_potential_losses_from_conversion_ L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13021-017-0080-2 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
Try the Free App:
Prime PubMed app for iOS iPhone iPad
Prime PubMed app for Android
Prime PubMed is provided
free to individuals by:
Unbound Medicine.