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Energy- and protein intake of surgical patients after the implementation of energy dense hospital menus.
Clin Nutr ESPEN. 2015 Jun; 10(3):e107-e111.CN

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND AIMS

Malnutrition is common among hospitalized patients and is associated with negative health consequences. Oral nutrition supplements (ONS) have been used to improve nutritional status of malnourished patients. Considering the costs and the sometimes poor acceptance of ONS, the present study investigated the effects of changing hospital food composition on patients' energy- and protein intake.

METHODS

One-hundred-and-six patients admitted to the Department of Cardio Thoracic Surgery at University Hospital in Iceland in 2013 were recruited. Inclusion criteria were age ≥18 years, hospital stay of ≥five days and ability to eat. In 2012 a new hospital menu was implemented and the meals contain more energy dense foods in comparison to earlier. Energy- and protein intake from the five meals provided daily were estimated using a validated plate diagram sheet on days 3-5 after surgery and compared to similar data retrieved in 2011.

RESULTS

In 2013 92 participants finished the study, data from 69 patients were available from 2011. Energy- and protein requirements were similar between years. Energy provided by meals was higher in 2013 (1711 ± 199 vs. 1946 ± 65 kcal, P < 0.001), accordingly energy intake from meals was higher in 2013 (1096 ± 340 vs. 1293 ± 386 kcal/d; P = 0.001). Protein intake from meals was not different. However, the total energy- and protein intake of patients was unchanged between 2011 (1374 ± 394 kcal; 62.1 ± 17.8 g) and 2013 (1452 ± 389 kcal; 60.2 ± 17.2 g) because the consumption of in-between meals (ONS or food brought from home) was less in the 2013 (170 ± 171 vs. 282 ± 207kcal, P < 0.001 and 13.2 ± 10.3 vs. 6.9 ± 6.5 g, P < 0.001, respectively).

CONCLUSIONS

Our study shows that an increase in energy density increases energy consumed from hospital meals, however, they did not increase total energy intake due to a decrease in use of ONS and home brought food.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Unit for Nutrition Research, University of Iceland and Landspitali National University Hospital, Reykjavik, Iceland.Hospital Food and Nutrition Services, Landspitali National University Hospital, Reykjavik, Iceland.Unit for Nutrition Research, University of Iceland and Landspitali National University Hospital, Reykjavik, Iceland; Faculty of Food Science and Human Nutrition, University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland. Electronic address: alfonsra@hi.is.Unit for Nutrition Research, University of Iceland and Landspitali National University Hospital, Reykjavik, Iceland; Faculty of Food Science and Human Nutrition, University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

28531384

Citation

Ingadottir, Arora R., et al. "Energy- and Protein Intake of Surgical Patients After the Implementation of Energy Dense Hospital Menus." Clinical Nutrition ESPEN, vol. 10, no. 3, 2015, pp. e107-e111.
Ingadottir AR, Hilmisdottir HB, Ramel A, et al. Energy- and protein intake of surgical patients after the implementation of energy dense hospital menus. Clin Nutr ESPEN. 2015;10(3):e107-e111.
Ingadottir, A. R., Hilmisdottir, H. B., Ramel, A., & Gunnarsdottir, I. (2015). Energy- and protein intake of surgical patients after the implementation of energy dense hospital menus. Clinical Nutrition ESPEN, 10(3), e107-e111. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.clnesp.2015.03.081
Ingadottir AR, et al. Energy- and Protein Intake of Surgical Patients After the Implementation of Energy Dense Hospital Menus. Clin Nutr ESPEN. 2015;10(3):e107-e111. PubMed PMID: 28531384.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Energy- and protein intake of surgical patients after the implementation of energy dense hospital menus. AU - Ingadottir,Arora R, AU - Hilmisdottir,Heida B, AU - Ramel,Alfons, AU - Gunnarsdottir,Ingibjorg, Y1 - 2015/05/21/ PY - 2014/08/21/received PY - 2015/03/10/revised PY - 2015/03/24/accepted PY - 2017/5/23/entrez PY - 2015/6/1/pubmed PY - 2015/6/1/medline KW - Energy density KW - Energy intake KW - Hospital KW - Patients SP - e107 EP - e111 JF - Clinical nutrition ESPEN JO - Clin Nutr ESPEN VL - 10 IS - 3 N2 - BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Malnutrition is common among hospitalized patients and is associated with negative health consequences. Oral nutrition supplements (ONS) have been used to improve nutritional status of malnourished patients. Considering the costs and the sometimes poor acceptance of ONS, the present study investigated the effects of changing hospital food composition on patients' energy- and protein intake. METHODS: One-hundred-and-six patients admitted to the Department of Cardio Thoracic Surgery at University Hospital in Iceland in 2013 were recruited. Inclusion criteria were age ≥18 years, hospital stay of ≥five days and ability to eat. In 2012 a new hospital menu was implemented and the meals contain more energy dense foods in comparison to earlier. Energy- and protein intake from the five meals provided daily were estimated using a validated plate diagram sheet on days 3-5 after surgery and compared to similar data retrieved in 2011. RESULTS: In 2013 92 participants finished the study, data from 69 patients were available from 2011. Energy- and protein requirements were similar between years. Energy provided by meals was higher in 2013 (1711 ± 199 vs. 1946 ± 65 kcal, P < 0.001), accordingly energy intake from meals was higher in 2013 (1096 ± 340 vs. 1293 ± 386 kcal/d; P = 0.001). Protein intake from meals was not different. However, the total energy- and protein intake of patients was unchanged between 2011 (1374 ± 394 kcal; 62.1 ± 17.8 g) and 2013 (1452 ± 389 kcal; 60.2 ± 17.2 g) because the consumption of in-between meals (ONS or food brought from home) was less in the 2013 (170 ± 171 vs. 282 ± 207kcal, P < 0.001 and 13.2 ± 10.3 vs. 6.9 ± 6.5 g, P < 0.001, respectively). CONCLUSIONS: Our study shows that an increase in energy density increases energy consumed from hospital meals, however, they did not increase total energy intake due to a decrease in use of ONS and home brought food. SN - 2405-4577 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28531384/Energy__and_protein_intake_of_surgical_patients_after_the_implementation_of_energy_dense_hospital_menus_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S2405-4577(15)00094-7 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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