Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Most consumed processed foods by patients on hemodialysis: Alert for phosphate-containing additives and the phosphate-to-protein ratio.
Clin Nutr ESPEN. 2016 08; 14:37-41.CN

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND AIMS

Hyperphosphatemia is common in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) stages IV and V because of decreased phosphorus excretion. Phosphatemia is closely related to dietary intake. Thus, a better understanding of sources of dietary phosphate consumption, absorption and restriction, particularly inorganic phosphate found in food additives, is key to prevent consequences of this complication. Our aims were to investigate the most commonly consumed processed foods by patients with CKD on hemodialysis, to analyze phosphate and protein content of these foods using chemical analysis and to compare these processed foods with fresh foods.

METHODS

We performed a cross-sectional descriptive analytical study using food frequency questionnaires to rank the most consumed industrialized foods and beverages. Total phosphate content was determined by metavanadate colorimetry, and nitrogen content was determined by the Kjeldahl method. Protein amounts were estimated from nitrogen content. The phosphate-to-protein ratio (mg/g) was then calculated. Processed meat protein and phosphate content were compared with the nutritional composition of fresh foods using the Brazilian Food Composition Table. Phosphate measurement results were compared with data from the Food Composition Table - Support for Nutritional Decisions. An α level of 5% was considered significant.

RESULTS

Food frequency questionnaires were performed on 100 patients (mean age, 59 ± 14 years; 57% male). Phosphate additives were mentioned on 70% of the product labels analyzed. Proteins with phosphate-containing additives provided approximately twice as much phosphate per gram of protein compared with that of fresh foods (p < 0.0001).

CONCLUSIONS

Protein and phosphate content of processed foods are higher than those of fresh foods, as well as phosphate-to-protein ratio. A better understanding of phosphate content in foods, particularly processed foods, may contribute to better control of phosphatemia in patients with CKD.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Faculdade de Medicina de Botucatu, Departamento de Clínica Médica, Univ Estadual Paulista (UNESP), Botucatu, Sao Paulo, Brazil.Faculdade de Medicina de Botucatu, Departamento de Clínica Médica, Univ Estadual Paulista (UNESP), Botucatu, Sao Paulo, Brazil.Faculdade de Medicina de Botucatu, Departamento de Clínica Médica, Univ Estadual Paulista (UNESP), Botucatu, Sao Paulo, Brazil.Faculdade de Medicina de Botucatu, Departamento de Clínica Médica, Univ Estadual Paulista (UNESP), Botucatu, Sao Paulo, Brazil.Faculdade de Medicina de Botucatu, Departamento de Clínica Médica, Univ Estadual Paulista (UNESP), Botucatu, Sao Paulo, Brazil. Electronic address: jteixeir@fmb.unesp.br.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

28531397

Citation

Watanabe, Marcela T., et al. "Most Consumed Processed Foods By Patients On Hemodialysis: Alert for Phosphate-containing Additives and the Phosphate-to-protein Ratio." Clinical Nutrition ESPEN, vol. 14, 2016, pp. 37-41.
Watanabe MT, Araujo RM, Vogt BP, et al. Most consumed processed foods by patients on hemodialysis: Alert for phosphate-containing additives and the phosphate-to-protein ratio. Clin Nutr ESPEN. 2016;14:37-41.
Watanabe, M. T., Araujo, R. M., Vogt, B. P., Barretti, P., & Caramori, J. C. T. (2016). Most consumed processed foods by patients on hemodialysis: Alert for phosphate-containing additives and the phosphate-to-protein ratio. Clinical Nutrition ESPEN, 14, 37-41. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.clnesp.2016.05.001
Watanabe MT, et al. Most Consumed Processed Foods By Patients On Hemodialysis: Alert for Phosphate-containing Additives and the Phosphate-to-protein Ratio. Clin Nutr ESPEN. 2016;14:37-41. PubMed PMID: 28531397.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Most consumed processed foods by patients on hemodialysis: Alert for phosphate-containing additives and the phosphate-to-protein ratio. AU - Watanabe,Marcela T, AU - Araujo,Raphael M, AU - Vogt,Barbara P, AU - Barretti,Pasqual, AU - Caramori,Jacqueline C T, Y1 - 2016/06/01/ PY - 2015/12/28/received PY - 2016/03/25/revised PY - 2016/05/10/accepted PY - 2017/5/23/entrez PY - 2017/5/23/pubmed PY - 2018/1/25/medline KW - Chronic kidney disease KW - Food KW - Food additives KW - Hemodialysis KW - Nutrition KW - Phosphate SP - 37 EP - 41 JF - Clinical nutrition ESPEN JO - Clin Nutr ESPEN VL - 14 N2 - BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Hyperphosphatemia is common in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) stages IV and V because of decreased phosphorus excretion. Phosphatemia is closely related to dietary intake. Thus, a better understanding of sources of dietary phosphate consumption, absorption and restriction, particularly inorganic phosphate found in food additives, is key to prevent consequences of this complication. Our aims were to investigate the most commonly consumed processed foods by patients with CKD on hemodialysis, to analyze phosphate and protein content of these foods using chemical analysis and to compare these processed foods with fresh foods. METHODS: We performed a cross-sectional descriptive analytical study using food frequency questionnaires to rank the most consumed industrialized foods and beverages. Total phosphate content was determined by metavanadate colorimetry, and nitrogen content was determined by the Kjeldahl method. Protein amounts were estimated from nitrogen content. The phosphate-to-protein ratio (mg/g) was then calculated. Processed meat protein and phosphate content were compared with the nutritional composition of fresh foods using the Brazilian Food Composition Table. Phosphate measurement results were compared with data from the Food Composition Table - Support for Nutritional Decisions. An α level of 5% was considered significant. RESULTS: Food frequency questionnaires were performed on 100 patients (mean age, 59 ± 14 years; 57% male). Phosphate additives were mentioned on 70% of the product labels analyzed. Proteins with phosphate-containing additives provided approximately twice as much phosphate per gram of protein compared with that of fresh foods (p < 0.0001). CONCLUSIONS: Protein and phosphate content of processed foods are higher than those of fresh foods, as well as phosphate-to-protein ratio. A better understanding of phosphate content in foods, particularly processed foods, may contribute to better control of phosphatemia in patients with CKD. SN - 2405-4577 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28531397/Most_consumed_processed_foods_by_patients_on_hemodialysis:_Alert_for_phosphate_containing_additives_and_the_phosphate_to_protein_ratio_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S2405-4577(16)30222-4 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -