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Caffeine ingestion acutely enhances muscular strength and power but not muscular endurance in resistance-trained men.
Eur J Sport Sci. 2017 Sep; 17(8):1029-1036.EJ

Abstract

The goal of this randomized, double-blind, cross-over study was to assess the acute effects of caffeine ingestion on muscular strength and power, muscular endurance, rate of perceived exertion (RPE), and pain perception (PP) in resistance-trained men. Seventeen volunteers (mean ± SD: age = 26 ± 6 years, stature = 182 ± 9 cm, body mass = 84 ± 9 kg, resistance training experience = 7 ± 3 years) consumed placebo or 6 mg kg-1 of anhydrous caffeine 1 h before testing. Muscular power was assessed with seated medicine ball throw and vertical jump exercises, muscular strength with one-repetition maximum (1RM) barbell back squat and bench press exercises, and muscular endurance with repetitions of back squat and bench press exercises (load corresponding to 60% of 1RM) to momentary muscular failure. RPE and PP were assessed immediately after the completion of the back squat and bench press exercises. Compared to placebo, caffeine intake enhanced 1RM back squat performance (+2.8%; effect size [ES] = 0.19; p = .016), which was accompanied by a reduced RPE (+7%; ES = 0.53; p = .037), and seated medicine ball throw performance (+4.3%, ES = 0.32; p = .009). Improvements in 1RM bench press were not noted although there were significant (p = .029) decreases in PP related to this exercise when participants ingested caffeine. The results point to an acute benefit of caffeine intake in enhancing lower-body strength, likely due to a decrease in RPE; upper-, but not lower-body power; and no effects on muscular endurance, in resistance-trained men. Individuals competing in events in which strength and power are important performance-related factors may consider taking 6 mg kg-1 of caffeine pre-training/competition for performance enhancement.

Authors+Show Affiliations

a Institute of Sport, Exercise and Active Living (ISEAL) , Victoria University , Melbourne , Australia.b Faculty of Kinesiology , University of Zagreb , Zagreb , Croatia.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial

Language

eng

PubMed ID

28537195

Citation

Grgic, Jozo, and Pavle Mikulic. "Caffeine Ingestion Acutely Enhances Muscular Strength and Power but Not Muscular Endurance in Resistance-trained Men." European Journal of Sport Science, vol. 17, no. 8, 2017, pp. 1029-1036.
Grgic J, Mikulic P. Caffeine ingestion acutely enhances muscular strength and power but not muscular endurance in resistance-trained men. Eur J Sport Sci. 2017;17(8):1029-1036.
Grgic, J., & Mikulic, P. (2017). Caffeine ingestion acutely enhances muscular strength and power but not muscular endurance in resistance-trained men. European Journal of Sport Science, 17(8), 1029-1036. https://doi.org/10.1080/17461391.2017.1330362
Grgic J, Mikulic P. Caffeine Ingestion Acutely Enhances Muscular Strength and Power but Not Muscular Endurance in Resistance-trained Men. Eur J Sport Sci. 2017;17(8):1029-1036. PubMed PMID: 28537195.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Caffeine ingestion acutely enhances muscular strength and power but not muscular endurance in resistance-trained men. AU - Grgic,Jozo, AU - Mikulic,Pavle, Y1 - 2017/05/24/ PY - 2017/5/26/pubmed PY - 2018/2/8/medline PY - 2017/5/25/entrez KW - Fatigue KW - metabolism KW - nutrition KW - performance SP - 1029 EP - 1036 JF - European journal of sport science JO - Eur J Sport Sci VL - 17 IS - 8 N2 - The goal of this randomized, double-blind, cross-over study was to assess the acute effects of caffeine ingestion on muscular strength and power, muscular endurance, rate of perceived exertion (RPE), and pain perception (PP) in resistance-trained men. Seventeen volunteers (mean ± SD: age = 26 ± 6 years, stature = 182 ± 9 cm, body mass = 84 ± 9 kg, resistance training experience = 7 ± 3 years) consumed placebo or 6 mg kg-1 of anhydrous caffeine 1 h before testing. Muscular power was assessed with seated medicine ball throw and vertical jump exercises, muscular strength with one-repetition maximum (1RM) barbell back squat and bench press exercises, and muscular endurance with repetitions of back squat and bench press exercises (load corresponding to 60% of 1RM) to momentary muscular failure. RPE and PP were assessed immediately after the completion of the back squat and bench press exercises. Compared to placebo, caffeine intake enhanced 1RM back squat performance (+2.8%; effect size [ES] = 0.19; p = .016), which was accompanied by a reduced RPE (+7%; ES = 0.53; p = .037), and seated medicine ball throw performance (+4.3%, ES = 0.32; p = .009). Improvements in 1RM bench press were not noted although there were significant (p = .029) decreases in PP related to this exercise when participants ingested caffeine. The results point to an acute benefit of caffeine intake in enhancing lower-body strength, likely due to a decrease in RPE; upper-, but not lower-body power; and no effects on muscular endurance, in resistance-trained men. Individuals competing in events in which strength and power are important performance-related factors may consider taking 6 mg kg-1 of caffeine pre-training/competition for performance enhancement. SN - 1536-7290 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28537195/Caffeine_ingestion_acutely_enhances_muscular_strength_and_power_but_not_muscular_endurance_in_resistance_trained_men_ L2 - https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/17461391.2017.1330362 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -