Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Traumatic brain injury and vestibulo-ocular function: current challenges and future prospects.
Eye Brain 2016; 8:153-164EB

Abstract

Normal function of the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) coordinates eye movement with head movement, in order to provide clear vision during motion and maintain balance. VOR is generated within the semicircular canals of the inner ear to elicit compensatory eye movements, which maintain stability of images on the fovea during brief, rapid head motion, otherwise known as gaze stability. Normal VOR function is necessary in carrying out activities of daily living (eg, walking and riding in a car) and is of particular importance in higher demand activities (eg, sports-related activities). Disruption or damage in the VOR can result in symptoms such as movement-related dizziness, blurry vision, difficulty maintaining balance with head movements, and even nausea. Dizziness is one of the most common symptoms following traumatic brain injury (TBI) and is considered a risk factor for a prolonged recovery. Assessment of the vestibular system is of particular importance following TBI, in conjunction with oculomotor control, due to the intrinsic neural circuitry that exists between the ocular and vestibular systems. The purpose of this article is to review the physiology of the VOR and the visual-vestibular symptoms associated with TBI and to discuss assessment and treatment guidelines for TBI. Current challenges and future prospects will also be addressed.

Authors+Show Affiliations

360 Balance and Hearing, Department of Physical Therapy, Austin, TX. Concussion Health, Department of Clinical Education, Austin, TX. Conquering Concussions, Scottsdale, AZ. Barrow Neurological Institute at Phoenix Children's Hospital, Phoenix, AZ.Barrow Neurological Institute at Phoenix Children's Hospital, Phoenix, AZ. Department of Child Health, University of Arizona College of Medicine-Phoenix, Phoenix, AZ. The CACTIS Foundation, Scottsdale. Phoenix VA Healthcare System, Phoenix, AZ. Department of Psychology, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

28539811

Citation

Wallace, Bridgett, and Jonathan Lifshitz. "Traumatic Brain Injury and Vestibulo-ocular Function: Current Challenges and Future Prospects." Eye and Brain, vol. 8, 2016, pp. 153-164.
Wallace B, Lifshitz J. Traumatic brain injury and vestibulo-ocular function: current challenges and future prospects. Eye Brain. 2016;8:153-164.
Wallace, B., & Lifshitz, J. (2016). Traumatic brain injury and vestibulo-ocular function: current challenges and future prospects. Eye and Brain, 8, pp. 153-164. doi:10.2147/EB.S82670.
Wallace B, Lifshitz J. Traumatic Brain Injury and Vestibulo-ocular Function: Current Challenges and Future Prospects. Eye Brain. 2016;8:153-164. PubMed PMID: 28539811.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Traumatic brain injury and vestibulo-ocular function: current challenges and future prospects. AU - Wallace,Bridgett, AU - Lifshitz,Jonathan, Y1 - 2016/09/06/ PY - 2017/5/26/entrez PY - 2017/5/26/pubmed PY - 2017/5/26/medline KW - concussion KW - ocular motor KW - symptoms KW - traumatic brain injury KW - vestibular SP - 153 EP - 164 JF - Eye and brain JO - Eye Brain VL - 8 N2 - Normal function of the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) coordinates eye movement with head movement, in order to provide clear vision during motion and maintain balance. VOR is generated within the semicircular canals of the inner ear to elicit compensatory eye movements, which maintain stability of images on the fovea during brief, rapid head motion, otherwise known as gaze stability. Normal VOR function is necessary in carrying out activities of daily living (eg, walking and riding in a car) and is of particular importance in higher demand activities (eg, sports-related activities). Disruption or damage in the VOR can result in symptoms such as movement-related dizziness, blurry vision, difficulty maintaining balance with head movements, and even nausea. Dizziness is one of the most common symptoms following traumatic brain injury (TBI) and is considered a risk factor for a prolonged recovery. Assessment of the vestibular system is of particular importance following TBI, in conjunction with oculomotor control, due to the intrinsic neural circuitry that exists between the ocular and vestibular systems. The purpose of this article is to review the physiology of the VOR and the visual-vestibular symptoms associated with TBI and to discuss assessment and treatment guidelines for TBI. Current challenges and future prospects will also be addressed. SN - 1179-2744 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28539811/Traumatic_brain_injury_and_vestibulo-ocular_function:_current_challenges_and_future_prospects L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.2147/EB.S82670 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -