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Intestinal dysbiosis and probiotic applications in autoimmune diseases.
Immunology. 2017 09; 152(1):1-12.I

Abstract

In humans, a complex interaction between the host immune system and commensal microbiota is required to maintain gut homeostasis. In this symbiotic relationship, the microbiota provides carbohydrate fermentation and digestion, vitamin synthesis and gut-associated lymphoid tissue development, as well as preventing colonization by pathobionts, whereas the host offers a niche and nutrients for the survival of the microbiota. However, when this mutualistic relationship is compromised and an altered interaction between immune cells and microorganisms occurs, the gut microbiota may cause or contribute to the establishment of infectious diseases and trigger autoimmune diseases. Researchers have made efforts to clarify the role of the microbiota in autoimmune disease development and find new therapeutic approaches to treat immune-mediated diseases. However, the exact mechanisms involved in the dysbiosis and breakdown of the gut epithelial barrier are currently unknown. Here, we provide a general overview of studies describing gut microbiota perturbations in animal models of autoimmune diseases, such as type 1 diabetes, multiple sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus. Moreover, we include the main studies concerning dysbiosis in humans and a critical discussion of the existing data on the use of probiotics in these autoimmune diseases.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Microbiome Study Group, School of Health Sciences Dr Paulo Prata, Barretos, São Paulo, Brazil.Microbiome Study Group, School of Health Sciences Dr Paulo Prata, Barretos, São Paulo, Brazil.Microbiome Study Group, School of Health Sciences Dr Paulo Prata, Barretos, São Paulo, Brazil.Microbiome Study Group, School of Health Sciences Dr Paulo Prata, Barretos, São Paulo, Brazil. Barretos Cancer Hospital, Barretos, São Paulo, Brazil.Barretos Cancer Hospital, Barretos, São Paulo, Brazil.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

28556916

Citation

de Oliveira, Gislane Lelis Vilela, et al. "Intestinal Dysbiosis and Probiotic Applications in Autoimmune Diseases." Immunology, vol. 152, no. 1, 2017, pp. 1-12.
de Oliveira GLV, Leite AZ, Higuchi BS, et al. Intestinal dysbiosis and probiotic applications in autoimmune diseases. Immunology. 2017;152(1):1-12.
de Oliveira, G. L. V., Leite, A. Z., Higuchi, B. S., Gonzaga, M. I., & Mariano, V. S. (2017). Intestinal dysbiosis and probiotic applications in autoimmune diseases. Immunology, 152(1), 1-12. https://doi.org/10.1111/imm.12765
de Oliveira GLV, et al. Intestinal Dysbiosis and Probiotic Applications in Autoimmune Diseases. Immunology. 2017;152(1):1-12. PubMed PMID: 28556916.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Intestinal dysbiosis and probiotic applications in autoimmune diseases. AU - de Oliveira,Gislane Lelis Vilela, AU - Leite,Aline Zazeri, AU - Higuchi,Bruna Stevanato, AU - Gonzaga,Marina Ignácio, AU - Mariano,Vânia Sammartino, Y1 - 2017/06/29/ PY - 2017/02/24/received PY - 2017/05/19/revised PY - 2017/05/24/accepted PY - 2017/5/31/pubmed PY - 2017/9/21/medline PY - 2017/5/31/entrez KW - autoimmunity KW - dysbiosis KW - gut barrier KW - inflammation KW - probiotics SP - 1 EP - 12 JF - Immunology JO - Immunology VL - 152 IS - 1 N2 - In humans, a complex interaction between the host immune system and commensal microbiota is required to maintain gut homeostasis. In this symbiotic relationship, the microbiota provides carbohydrate fermentation and digestion, vitamin synthesis and gut-associated lymphoid tissue development, as well as preventing colonization by pathobionts, whereas the host offers a niche and nutrients for the survival of the microbiota. However, when this mutualistic relationship is compromised and an altered interaction between immune cells and microorganisms occurs, the gut microbiota may cause or contribute to the establishment of infectious diseases and trigger autoimmune diseases. Researchers have made efforts to clarify the role of the microbiota in autoimmune disease development and find new therapeutic approaches to treat immune-mediated diseases. However, the exact mechanisms involved in the dysbiosis and breakdown of the gut epithelial barrier are currently unknown. Here, we provide a general overview of studies describing gut microbiota perturbations in animal models of autoimmune diseases, such as type 1 diabetes, multiple sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus. Moreover, we include the main studies concerning dysbiosis in humans and a critical discussion of the existing data on the use of probiotics in these autoimmune diseases. SN - 1365-2567 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28556916/Intestinal_dysbiosis_and_probiotic_applications_in_autoimmune_diseases_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/imm.12765 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -