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Mean Velocity vs. Mean Propulsive Velocity vs. Peak Velocity: Which Variable Determines Bench Press Relative Load With Higher Reliability?
J Strength Cond Res. 2018 May; 32(5):1273-1279.JS

Abstract

García-Ramos, A, Pestaña-Melero, FL, Pérez-Castilla, A, Rojas, FJ, and Haff, GG. Mean velocity vs. mean propulsive velocity vs. peak velocity: which variable determines bench press relative load with higher reliability? J Strength Cond Res 32(5): 1273-1279, 2018-This study aimed to compare between 3 velocity variables (mean velocity [MV], mean propulsive velocity [MPV], and peak velocity [PV]): (a) the linearity of the load-velocity relationship, (b) the accuracy of general regression equations to predict relative load (%1RM), and (c) the between-session reliability of the velocity attained at each percentage of the 1-repetition maximum (%1RM). The full load-velocity relationship of 30 men was evaluated by means of linear regression models in the concentric-only and eccentric-concentric bench press throw (BPT) variants performed with a Smith machine. The 2 sessions of each BPT variant were performed within the same week separated by 48-72 hours. The main findings were as follows: (a) the MV showed the strongest linearity of the load-velocity relationship (median r = 0.989 for concentric-only BPT and 0.993 for eccentric-concentric BPT), followed by MPV (median r = 0.983 for concentric-only BPT and 0.980 for eccentric-concentric BPT), and finally PV (median r = 0.974 for concentric-only BPT and 0.969 for eccentric-concentric BPT); (b) the accuracy of the general regression equations to predict relative load (%1RM) from movement velocity was higher for MV (SEE = 3.80-4.76%1RM) than for MPV (SEE = 4.91-5.56%1RM) and PV (SEE = 5.36-5.77%1RM); and (c) the PV showed the lowest within-subjects coefficient of variation (3.50%-3.87%), followed by MV (4.05%-4.93%), and finally MPV (5.11%-6.03%). Taken together, these results suggest that the MV could be the most appropriate variable for monitoring the relative load (%1RM) in the BPT exercise performed in a Smith machine.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Physical Education and Sport, Faculty of Sport Sciences, University of Granada, Granada, Spain. Faculty of Education, Catholic University of the Most Holy Conception, Concepción, Chile and.Department of Physical Education and Sport, Faculty of Sport Sciences, University of Granada, Granada, Spain.Department of Physical Education and Sport, Faculty of Sport Sciences, University of Granada, Granada, Spain.Department of Physical Education and Sport, Faculty of Sport Sciences, University of Granada, Granada, Spain.Center for Exercise and Sport Science Research, Edith Cowan University, Joondalup, Western Australia, Australia.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

28557855

Citation

García-Ramos, Amador, et al. "Mean Velocity Vs. Mean Propulsive Velocity Vs. Peak Velocity: Which Variable Determines Bench Press Relative Load With Higher Reliability?" Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, vol. 32, no. 5, 2018, pp. 1273-1279.
García-Ramos A, Pestaña-Melero FL, Pérez-Castilla A, et al. Mean Velocity vs. Mean Propulsive Velocity vs. Peak Velocity: Which Variable Determines Bench Press Relative Load With Higher Reliability? J Strength Cond Res. 2018;32(5):1273-1279.
García-Ramos, A., Pestaña-Melero, F. L., Pérez-Castilla, A., Rojas, F. J., & Gregory Haff, G. (2018). Mean Velocity vs. Mean Propulsive Velocity vs. Peak Velocity: Which Variable Determines Bench Press Relative Load With Higher Reliability? Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, 32(5), 1273-1279. https://doi.org/10.1519/JSC.0000000000001998
García-Ramos A, et al. Mean Velocity Vs. Mean Propulsive Velocity Vs. Peak Velocity: Which Variable Determines Bench Press Relative Load With Higher Reliability. J Strength Cond Res. 2018;32(5):1273-1279. PubMed PMID: 28557855.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Mean Velocity vs. Mean Propulsive Velocity vs. Peak Velocity: Which Variable Determines Bench Press Relative Load With Higher Reliability? AU - García-Ramos,Amador, AU - Pestaña-Melero,Francisco L, AU - Pérez-Castilla,Alejandro, AU - Rojas,Francisco J, AU - Gregory Haff,G, PY - 2017/5/31/pubmed PY - 2018/9/18/medline PY - 2017/5/31/entrez SP - 1273 EP - 1279 JF - Journal of strength and conditioning research JO - J Strength Cond Res VL - 32 IS - 5 N2 - García-Ramos, A, Pestaña-Melero, FL, Pérez-Castilla, A, Rojas, FJ, and Haff, GG. Mean velocity vs. mean propulsive velocity vs. peak velocity: which variable determines bench press relative load with higher reliability? J Strength Cond Res 32(5): 1273-1279, 2018-This study aimed to compare between 3 velocity variables (mean velocity [MV], mean propulsive velocity [MPV], and peak velocity [PV]): (a) the linearity of the load-velocity relationship, (b) the accuracy of general regression equations to predict relative load (%1RM), and (c) the between-session reliability of the velocity attained at each percentage of the 1-repetition maximum (%1RM). The full load-velocity relationship of 30 men was evaluated by means of linear regression models in the concentric-only and eccentric-concentric bench press throw (BPT) variants performed with a Smith machine. The 2 sessions of each BPT variant were performed within the same week separated by 48-72 hours. The main findings were as follows: (a) the MV showed the strongest linearity of the load-velocity relationship (median r = 0.989 for concentric-only BPT and 0.993 for eccentric-concentric BPT), followed by MPV (median r = 0.983 for concentric-only BPT and 0.980 for eccentric-concentric BPT), and finally PV (median r = 0.974 for concentric-only BPT and 0.969 for eccentric-concentric BPT); (b) the accuracy of the general regression equations to predict relative load (%1RM) from movement velocity was higher for MV (SEE = 3.80-4.76%1RM) than for MPV (SEE = 4.91-5.56%1RM) and PV (SEE = 5.36-5.77%1RM); and (c) the PV showed the lowest within-subjects coefficient of variation (3.50%-3.87%), followed by MV (4.05%-4.93%), and finally MPV (5.11%-6.03%). Taken together, these results suggest that the MV could be the most appropriate variable for monitoring the relative load (%1RM) in the BPT exercise performed in a Smith machine. SN - 1533-4287 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28557855/Mean_Velocity_vs__Mean_Propulsive_Velocity_vs__Peak_Velocity:_Which_Variable_Determines_Bench_Press_Relative_Load_With_Higher_Reliability L2 - http://dx.doi.org/10.1519/JSC.0000000000001998 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -