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Family and Marital Conflict Among Chinese Older Adults in the United States: The Influence of Personal Coping Resources.
J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci. 2017 Jul 01; 72(suppl_1):S50-S55.JG

Abstract

Background

Conflict in the family is a major risk factor for the well-being of older immigrants, whose lives are centered around their families. This study examined the potential linkage between personal coping resources and family and marital conflict among U.S. Chinese older adults.

Methods

Data were derived from the PINE study, a population-based study of Chinese elders in Chicago (N = 3,157). Logistic regressions were carried out to predict the likelihood of having conflict with family members and with the spouse, respectively, using indicators of personal coping resources (ie, socioeconomic status, physical health, acculturation level, perceived children's filial piety, number of friends, and sense of mastery).

Results

The results showed that older adults with higher education (odds ratio [OR] = 1.03, confidence interval [CI] = 1.01-1.06; OR = 1.09, CI = 1.06-1.11, respectively), lower perception of children being filial (OR = 0.95, CI = 0.93-0.97; OR = 0.96, CI = 0.94-0.98], respectively), and lower sense of mastery (OR = 0.95, CI = 0.94-0.96; OR = 0.98, CI = 0.97-0.99, respectively) were more likely to report both family and marital conflict. Older adults who had more friends were less likely to report marital conflict (OR = 0.61, CI = 0.43-0.86).

Conclusions

Overall, older immigrants with greater coping resources seemed to have less family and marital conflict. Particularly important are their own sense of control and available support from children and friends in the new society. Higher education could be a risk factor for these conflicts. Future studies are needed to distinguish everyday life conflict from acculturation-related conflict in this population.

Authors+Show Affiliations

School of Social Work, University of Iowa.Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois.School of Nursing, University of Hong Kong, China.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

28575252

Citation

Guo, Man, et al. "Family and Marital Conflict Among Chinese Older Adults in the United States: the Influence of Personal Coping Resources." The Journals of Gerontology. Series A, Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences, vol. 72, no. suppl_1, 2017, pp. S50-S55.
Guo M, Dong X, Tiwari A. Family and Marital Conflict Among Chinese Older Adults in the United States: The Influence of Personal Coping Resources. J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci. 2017;72(suppl_1):S50-S55.
Guo, M., Dong, X., & Tiwari, A. (2017). Family and Marital Conflict Among Chinese Older Adults in the United States: The Influence of Personal Coping Resources. The Journals of Gerontology. Series A, Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences, 72(suppl_1), S50-S55. https://doi.org/10.1093/gerona/glw129
Guo M, Dong X, Tiwari A. Family and Marital Conflict Among Chinese Older Adults in the United States: the Influence of Personal Coping Resources. J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci. 2017 Jul 1;72(suppl_1):S50-S55. PubMed PMID: 28575252.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Family and Marital Conflict Among Chinese Older Adults in the United States: The Influence of Personal Coping Resources. AU - Guo,Man, AU - Dong,Xinqi, AU - Tiwari,Agnes, PY - 2016/01/20/received PY - 2016/06/16/accepted PY - 2017/6/3/entrez PY - 2017/6/3/pubmed PY - 2017/8/22/medline KW - Acculturation KW - Filial piety KW - Minority aging KW - Resilience KW - Sense of mastery KW - Socioeconomic issues SP - S50 EP - S55 JF - The journals of gerontology. Series A, Biological sciences and medical sciences JO - J. Gerontol. A Biol. Sci. Med. Sci. VL - 72 IS - suppl_1 N2 - Background: Conflict in the family is a major risk factor for the well-being of older immigrants, whose lives are centered around their families. This study examined the potential linkage between personal coping resources and family and marital conflict among U.S. Chinese older adults. Methods: Data were derived from the PINE study, a population-based study of Chinese elders in Chicago (N = 3,157). Logistic regressions were carried out to predict the likelihood of having conflict with family members and with the spouse, respectively, using indicators of personal coping resources (ie, socioeconomic status, physical health, acculturation level, perceived children's filial piety, number of friends, and sense of mastery). Results: The results showed that older adults with higher education (odds ratio [OR] = 1.03, confidence interval [CI] = 1.01-1.06; OR = 1.09, CI = 1.06-1.11, respectively), lower perception of children being filial (OR = 0.95, CI = 0.93-0.97; OR = 0.96, CI = 0.94-0.98], respectively), and lower sense of mastery (OR = 0.95, CI = 0.94-0.96; OR = 0.98, CI = 0.97-0.99, respectively) were more likely to report both family and marital conflict. Older adults who had more friends were less likely to report marital conflict (OR = 0.61, CI = 0.43-0.86). Conclusions: Overall, older immigrants with greater coping resources seemed to have less family and marital conflict. Particularly important are their own sense of control and available support from children and friends in the new society. Higher education could be a risk factor for these conflicts. Future studies are needed to distinguish everyday life conflict from acculturation-related conflict in this population. SN - 1758-535X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28575252/Family_and_Marital_Conflict_Among_Chinese_Older_Adults_in_the_United_States:_The_Influence_of_Personal_Coping_Resources_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/biomedgerontology/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/gerona/glw129 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -