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Change of Cognitive Function in U.S. Chinese Older Adults: A Population-Based Study.
J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci 2017; 72(suppl_1):S5-S10JG

Abstract

Background

This study aims to assess cognitive change in a 2-year period among U.S. Chinese older adults and examine sociodemographic characteristics associated with the change.

Methods

Data were from the Population Study of Chinese Elderly (PINE) in which 2,713 participants (aged 60 and older) received in-home interviews at both the baseline and 2-year follow-up. A battery of cognitive tests that assessed episodic memory, working memory, perceptual speed, and overall cognitive status were administered in both times. A composite global cognition was constructed using all tests. Mixed-effect regression was conducted.

Results

Older age was associated with worse baseline cognition (ie, in all cognitive abilities) and faster decline in global cognition, episodic memory, and perceptual speed-rates of decline increased by .006, .004, and .009 standard score units, respectively, for each year older. More education was associated with better baseline cognition, but each year of additional schooling increased rates of decline in global cognition and episodic memory by .004 and .012 standard score units, respectively. Men performed better than women in most cognitive abilities at baseline but had faster rates of decline in working memory. Higher income was associated with better cognition at baseline and reduced rates of decline in working memory.

Conclusions

Findings suggest differences in the rates of cognitive change by age, sex, education, and income. Those in advancing age are vulnerable to cognitive decline. The effects of education and sex on baseline performance versus change suggest a role for life experiences in cognition.

Authors+Show Affiliations

School of Social Work, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor.Institute of Neurology, Huashan Hospital, Fudan University, National Clinical Research Center for Aging Diseases, WHO Collaborating Center for Research and Training in Neurosciences, Shanghai, China.Rory Meyers College of Nursing, New York University.Department of Internal Medicine, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Multicenter Study

Language

eng

PubMed ID

28575265

Citation

Li, Lydia W., et al. "Change of Cognitive Function in U.S. Chinese Older Adults: a Population-Based Study." The Journals of Gerontology. Series A, Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences, vol. 72, no. suppl_1, 2017, pp. S5-S10.
Li LW, Ding D, Wu B, et al. Change of Cognitive Function in U.S. Chinese Older Adults: A Population-Based Study. J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci. 2017;72(suppl_1):S5-S10.
Li, L. W., Ding, D., Wu, B., & Dong, X. (2017). Change of Cognitive Function in U.S. Chinese Older Adults: A Population-Based Study. The Journals of Gerontology. Series A, Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences, 72(suppl_1), pp. S5-S10. doi:10.1093/gerona/glx004.
Li LW, et al. Change of Cognitive Function in U.S. Chinese Older Adults: a Population-Based Study. J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci. 2017 Jul 1;72(suppl_1):S5-S10. PubMed PMID: 28575265.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Change of Cognitive Function in U.S. Chinese Older Adults: A Population-Based Study. AU - Li,Lydia W, AU - Ding,Ding, AU - Wu,Bei, AU - Dong,XinQi, PY - 2016/10/15/received PY - 2017/01/02/accepted PY - 2017/6/3/entrez PY - 2017/6/3/pubmed PY - 2017/8/22/medline KW - Chinese KW - Cognitive aging KW - Longitudinal study SP - S5 EP - S10 JF - The journals of gerontology. Series A, Biological sciences and medical sciences JO - J. Gerontol. A Biol. Sci. Med. Sci. VL - 72 IS - suppl_1 N2 - Background: This study aims to assess cognitive change in a 2-year period among U.S. Chinese older adults and examine sociodemographic characteristics associated with the change. Methods: Data were from the Population Study of Chinese Elderly (PINE) in which 2,713 participants (aged 60 and older) received in-home interviews at both the baseline and 2-year follow-up. A battery of cognitive tests that assessed episodic memory, working memory, perceptual speed, and overall cognitive status were administered in both times. A composite global cognition was constructed using all tests. Mixed-effect regression was conducted. Results: Older age was associated with worse baseline cognition (ie, in all cognitive abilities) and faster decline in global cognition, episodic memory, and perceptual speed-rates of decline increased by .006, .004, and .009 standard score units, respectively, for each year older. More education was associated with better baseline cognition, but each year of additional schooling increased rates of decline in global cognition and episodic memory by .004 and .012 standard score units, respectively. Men performed better than women in most cognitive abilities at baseline but had faster rates of decline in working memory. Higher income was associated with better cognition at baseline and reduced rates of decline in working memory. Conclusions: Findings suggest differences in the rates of cognitive change by age, sex, education, and income. Those in advancing age are vulnerable to cognitive decline. The effects of education and sex on baseline performance versus change suggest a role for life experiences in cognition. SN - 1758-535X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28575265/Change_of_Cognitive_Function_in_U_S__Chinese_Older_Adults:_A_Population_Based_Study_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/biomedgerontology/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/gerona/glx004 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -