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Incidence of Elder Abuse in a U.S. Chinese Population: Findings From the Longitudinal Cohort PINE Study.
J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci. 2017 Jul 01; 72(suppl_1):S95-S101.JG

Abstract

Background

Elder abuse (EA) is a global public health issue. However, no prior longitudinal research has quantified the incidence of EA, which is critical to understand risk factors and future prevention strategies.

Methods

The study is based on a longitudinal cohort design. We followed 2,713 U.S. Chinese older adults who agreed to participate in the study within 2011 to 2015. A structured questionnaire was used to collect data regarding the 2-year incidence of EA and its subtypes. We employed multiple logistic regression analyses to examine the associations between the sociodemographic characteristics and incident EA.

Results

The incidence of overall EA was 8.8% with 4.8% for psychological, 2.9% for financial, 0.5% for physical, 0.1% for sexual abuse, and 1.1% for caregiver neglect. Age, gender, duration of residence, language preference and health status change were associated with incident EA. Self-perceived worsened health was positively associated with overall EA (odds ratio [OR] 1.28 (1.01, 1.62). Women (OR 2.98 [1.10, 8.11]) and older individuals (OR 1.06 [1.00, 1.13]) had an increased risk of caregiver neglect. Older adults who have lived in the U.S. longer had a higher risk of financial exploitation (OR 1.02 [1.00, 1.05]). Individuals who prefer to speak Mandarin or English were more likely to experience EA (OR 2.08 [1.21, 3.58]) and sexual or physical abuse (OR 3.91 [1.01, 15.17]). No significant association was observed between education, income, marital status, number of children, country of origin, overall health, life quality, and incident EA.

Conclusion

This study presents the first illustration of EA incidence in a longitudinal cohort study, the findings of which verify and challenge prior fundamental assumptions of risk factors associated with EA, and are relevant to future prevention strategies.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Rush Institute for Healthy Aging, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois.Rush Institute for Healthy Aging, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

28575266

Citation

Dong, XinQi, and Bei Wang. "Incidence of Elder Abuse in a U.S. Chinese Population: Findings From the Longitudinal Cohort PINE Study." The Journals of Gerontology. Series A, Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences, vol. 72, no. suppl_1, 2017, pp. S95-S101.
Dong X, Wang B. Incidence of Elder Abuse in a U.S. Chinese Population: Findings From the Longitudinal Cohort PINE Study. J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci. 2017;72(suppl_1):S95-S101.
Dong, X., & Wang, B. (2017). Incidence of Elder Abuse in a U.S. Chinese Population: Findings From the Longitudinal Cohort PINE Study. The Journals of Gerontology. Series A, Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences, 72(suppl_1), S95-S101. https://doi.org/10.1093/gerona/glx005
Dong X, Wang B. Incidence of Elder Abuse in a U.S. Chinese Population: Findings From the Longitudinal Cohort PINE Study. J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci. 2017 Jul 1;72(suppl_1):S95-S101. PubMed PMID: 28575266.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Incidence of Elder Abuse in a U.S. Chinese Population: Findings From the Longitudinal Cohort PINE Study. AU - Dong,XinQi, AU - Wang,Bei, PY - 2016/11/16/received PY - 2017/01/02/accepted PY - 2017/6/3/entrez PY - 2017/6/3/pubmed PY - 2017/8/22/medline KW - Elder abuse KW - Longitudinal study KW - Risk factors SP - S95 EP - S101 JF - The journals of gerontology. Series A, Biological sciences and medical sciences JO - J. Gerontol. A Biol. Sci. Med. Sci. VL - 72 IS - suppl_1 N2 - Background: Elder abuse (EA) is a global public health issue. However, no prior longitudinal research has quantified the incidence of EA, which is critical to understand risk factors and future prevention strategies. Methods: The study is based on a longitudinal cohort design. We followed 2,713 U.S. Chinese older adults who agreed to participate in the study within 2011 to 2015. A structured questionnaire was used to collect data regarding the 2-year incidence of EA and its subtypes. We employed multiple logistic regression analyses to examine the associations between the sociodemographic characteristics and incident EA. Results: The incidence of overall EA was 8.8% with 4.8% for psychological, 2.9% for financial, 0.5% for physical, 0.1% for sexual abuse, and 1.1% for caregiver neglect. Age, gender, duration of residence, language preference and health status change were associated with incident EA. Self-perceived worsened health was positively associated with overall EA (odds ratio [OR] 1.28 (1.01, 1.62). Women (OR 2.98 [1.10, 8.11]) and older individuals (OR 1.06 [1.00, 1.13]) had an increased risk of caregiver neglect. Older adults who have lived in the U.S. longer had a higher risk of financial exploitation (OR 1.02 [1.00, 1.05]). Individuals who prefer to speak Mandarin or English were more likely to experience EA (OR 2.08 [1.21, 3.58]) and sexual or physical abuse (OR 3.91 [1.01, 15.17]). No significant association was observed between education, income, marital status, number of children, country of origin, overall health, life quality, and incident EA. Conclusion: This study presents the first illustration of EA incidence in a longitudinal cohort study, the findings of which verify and challenge prior fundamental assumptions of risk factors associated with EA, and are relevant to future prevention strategies. SN - 1758-535X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28575266/Incidence_of_Elder_Abuse_in_a_U_S__Chinese_Population:_Findings_From_the_Longitudinal_Cohort_PINE_Study_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/biomedgerontology/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/gerona/glx005 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -