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Dietary fiber intake is associated with chronic kidney disease (CKD) progression and cardiovascular risk, but not protein nutritional status, in adults with CKD.
Asia Pac J Clin Nutr. 2017; 26(4):598-605.AP

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES

Evidence suggests that dietary fiber benefits patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD); however, this conclusion requires further validation. In this study, we examined the effects of dietary fiber on kidney function, inflammation, indoxyl sulfate, nutritional status, and cardiovascular risk in patients with advanced CKD.

METHODS AND STUDY DESIGN

We performed linear regressions to assess the association between dietary fiber intake and CKD parameters. The aforementioned parameters were compared over an 18-month follow- up period. Kaplan-Meier analysis was used to investigate the association between fiber intake and Cardiac vascular disease (CVD).

RESULTS

In total, 157 patients were included in this study. Dietary fiber and inflammatory indices were associated (interleukin [IL]-6: β=-0.024, p=0.035). The differential estimated glomerular filtration rate (ΔeGFR) as well as levels of C-reactive protein, IL-6, indoxyl sulfate, and serum cholesterol in the higher fiber intake (>=25 g/day) group were lower than those in the lower fiber intake (<25 g/day) group (p<0.05). Differences in IL-6 and indoxyl sulfate levels were more significant in patients in the higher protein intake group (p<0.05). Dietary fiber intake may be a protective factor associated with CVD (hazard ratio=0.537 and 0.305- 0.947). The protein nutritional status was not different between the two groups (p>0.05).

CONCLUSIONS

Our results suggest that increasing fiber intake can retard the decrease in the eGFR; can reduce the levels of proinflammatory factors, indoxyl sulfate, and serum cholesterol; and is negatively associated with cardiovascular risk, but does not disrupt the nutritional status of patients with CKD.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Traditional Chinese Medicine, ZhuJiang Hospital, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, China. School of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, China. Department of Nephrology, Southern Medical University TCM-Integrated Hospital, Guangzhou, China.Department of Traditional Chinese Medicine, the First People's Hospital of Shunde Affiliated to Southern Medical University, Guangdong, China.School of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, China.Department of Traditional Chinese Medicine, ZhuJiang Hospital, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, China. School of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, China. Department of Nephrology, Southern Medical University TCM-Integrated Hospital, Guangzhou, China.Department of Endocrinology, the Third Affiliated Hospital, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, China.Department of Traditional Chinese Medicine, ZhuJiang Hospital, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, China. School of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, China. Department of Nephrology, Southern Medical University TCM-Integrated Hospital, Guangzhou, China.School of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, China. Email: xw76888@126.com.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

28582807

Citation

Lu, Lu, et al. "Dietary Fiber Intake Is Associated With Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) Progression and Cardiovascular Risk, but Not Protein Nutritional Status, in Adults With CKD." Asia Pacific Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 26, no. 4, 2017, pp. 598-605.
Lu L, Huang YF, Wang MQ, et al. Dietary fiber intake is associated with chronic kidney disease (CKD) progression and cardiovascular risk, but not protein nutritional status, in adults with CKD. Asia Pac J Clin Nutr. 2017;26(4):598-605.
Lu, L., Huang, Y. F., Wang, M. Q., Chen, D. X., Wan, H., Wei, L. B., & Xiao, W. (2017). Dietary fiber intake is associated with chronic kidney disease (CKD) progression and cardiovascular risk, but not protein nutritional status, in adults with CKD. Asia Pacific Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 26(4), 598-605. https://doi.org/10.6133/apjcn.072016.08
Lu L, et al. Dietary Fiber Intake Is Associated With Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) Progression and Cardiovascular Risk, but Not Protein Nutritional Status, in Adults With CKD. Asia Pac J Clin Nutr. 2017;26(4):598-605. PubMed PMID: 28582807.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Dietary fiber intake is associated with chronic kidney disease (CKD) progression and cardiovascular risk, but not protein nutritional status, in adults with CKD. AU - Lu,Lu, AU - Huang,Yan-Feng, AU - Wang,Ming-Qing, AU - Chen,De-Xiu, AU - Wan,Heng, AU - Wei,Lian-Bo, AU - Xiao,Wei, PY - 2017/6/6/entrez PY - 2017/6/7/pubmed PY - 2017/9/1/medline SP - 598 EP - 605 JF - Asia Pacific journal of clinical nutrition JO - Asia Pac J Clin Nutr VL - 26 IS - 4 N2 - BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Evidence suggests that dietary fiber benefits patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD); however, this conclusion requires further validation. In this study, we examined the effects of dietary fiber on kidney function, inflammation, indoxyl sulfate, nutritional status, and cardiovascular risk in patients with advanced CKD. METHODS AND STUDY DESIGN: We performed linear regressions to assess the association between dietary fiber intake and CKD parameters. The aforementioned parameters were compared over an 18-month follow- up period. Kaplan-Meier analysis was used to investigate the association between fiber intake and Cardiac vascular disease (CVD). RESULTS: In total, 157 patients were included in this study. Dietary fiber and inflammatory indices were associated (interleukin [IL]-6: β=-0.024, p=0.035). The differential estimated glomerular filtration rate (ΔeGFR) as well as levels of C-reactive protein, IL-6, indoxyl sulfate, and serum cholesterol in the higher fiber intake (>=25 g/day) group were lower than those in the lower fiber intake (<25 g/day) group (p<0.05). Differences in IL-6 and indoxyl sulfate levels were more significant in patients in the higher protein intake group (p<0.05). Dietary fiber intake may be a protective factor associated with CVD (hazard ratio=0.537 and 0.305- 0.947). The protein nutritional status was not different between the two groups (p>0.05). CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that increasing fiber intake can retard the decrease in the eGFR; can reduce the levels of proinflammatory factors, indoxyl sulfate, and serum cholesterol; and is negatively associated with cardiovascular risk, but does not disrupt the nutritional status of patients with CKD. SN - 0964-7058 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28582807/Dietary_fiber_intake_is_associated_with_chronic_kidney_disease__CKD__progression_and_cardiovascular_risk_but_not_protein_nutritional_status_in_adults_with_CKD_ L2 - http://apjcn.nhri.org.tw/server/APJCN/26/4/598.pdf DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -