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Insomnia, psychiatric disorders and suicidal ideation in a National Representative Sample of active Canadian Forces members.
BMC Psychiatry. 2017 06 06; 17(1):211.BP

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Past research on the association between insomnia and suicidal ideation (SI) has produced mixed findings. The current study explored the relationship between insomnia, SI, and past-year mental health status among a large Canadian Forces (CF) sample.

METHOD

Data was obtained from the 2013 Canadian Forces Mental Health Survey (CFMHS), and included a large representative sample of Canadian Regular Forces personnel (N = 6700). A series of univariate logistic regressions were conducted to test individual associations between past-year mental health status, insomnia, and potential confounds and SI. Mental health status included three groups: 0, 1, or two or more probable diagnoses of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), major depressive disorder (MDD), generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), panic disorder (PD) and alcohol abuse/dependence. Stepwise multivariate logistic regression was used to assess the relationship between insomnia and SI with mental health status as a moderator.

RESULTS

40.8% of respondents reported experiencing insomnia. Both insomnia and number of mental health conditions incrementally increased the risk of SI. However, past-year mental health status was a significant moderator of this relationship, such that for CF personnel with either no (AOR = 1.61, 1.37-1.89) or only one past-year mental health condition (AOR = 1.39, 1.12-1.73), an incremental increase in insomnia was associated with an increased likelihood of SI. However, in personnel with two or more past-year mental health disorders, insomnia was no longer significantly associated with SI (AOR = 1.04, 0.81-1.33).

CONCLUSIONS

Insomnia significantly increased the odds of SI, but only among individuals with no or one mental health condition. Findings highlight the importance of assessing insomnia among CF members in order to further suicide prevention efforts.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Western University, 1151 Richmond St, London, ON, N6A 3K7, Canada. Don.Richardson@sjhc.london.on.ca. McMaster University, 1280 Main St W, Hamilton, ON, L8S 4L8, Canada. Don.Richardson@sjhc.london.on.ca. Parkwood Operational Stress Injury Clinic-Parkwood Institute-St. Joseph's Health Care London, 550 Wellington Rd, London, ON, N6C 0A7, Canada. Don.Richardson@sjhc.london.on.ca. Canadian Forces Health Services Group and Department of Family Medicine, University of Ottawa, 75 Laurier Ave E, Ottawa, ON, K1N 6N5, Canada. Don.Richardson@sjhc.london.on.ca.Canadian Forces Health Services Group and Department of Family Medicine, University of Ottawa, 75 Laurier Ave E, Ottawa, ON, K1N 6N5, Canada.Parkwood Operational Stress Injury Clinic-Parkwood Institute-St. Joseph's Health Care London, 550 Wellington Rd, London, ON, N6C 0A7, Canada.Western University, 1151 Richmond St, London, ON, N6A 3K7, Canada. Canadian Forces Health Services Group and Department of Family Medicine, University of Ottawa, 75 Laurier Ave E, Ottawa, ON, K1N 6N5, Canada. Stamford International University, Prawet, Bangkok, 10250, Thailand.McMaster University, 1280 Main St W, Hamilton, ON, L8S 4L8, Canada. St. Joseph's Healthcare Hamilton, 2757 King Street East, Hamilton, ON, L8G 5E4, Canada. Ryerson University, 350 Victoria St, Toronto, ON, M5B 2K3, Canada.Parkwood Operational Stress Injury Clinic-Parkwood Institute-St. Joseph's Health Care London, 550 Wellington Rd, London, ON, N6C 0A7, Canada.Western University, 1151 Richmond St, London, ON, N6A 3K7, Canada. Parkwood Operational Stress Injury Clinic-Parkwood Institute-St. Joseph's Health Care London, 550 Wellington Rd, London, ON, N6C 0A7, Canada.University of Manitoba, 66 Chancellors Cir, Winnipeg, MB, R3T 2N2, Canada. Deer Lodge Centre Operational Stress Injury Clinic, 2109 Portage Avenue, Winnipeg, MB, R3J 0L3, Canada.University of Toledo, 2801 W Bancroft St, Toledo, OH, 43606, USA.Canadian Forces Health Services Group and Department of Family Medicine, University of Ottawa, 75 Laurier Ave E, Ottawa, ON, K1N 6N5, Canada.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

28583100

Citation

Richardson, J D., et al. "Insomnia, Psychiatric Disorders and Suicidal Ideation in a National Representative Sample of Active Canadian Forces Members." BMC Psychiatry, vol. 17, no. 1, 2017, p. 211.
Richardson JD, Thompson A, King L, et al. Insomnia, psychiatric disorders and suicidal ideation in a National Representative Sample of active Canadian Forces members. BMC Psychiatry. 2017;17(1):211.
Richardson, J. D., Thompson, A., King, L., Corbett, B., Shnaider, P., St Cyr, K., Nelson, C., Sareen, J., Elhai, J., & Zamorski, M. (2017). Insomnia, psychiatric disorders and suicidal ideation in a National Representative Sample of active Canadian Forces members. BMC Psychiatry, 17(1), 211. https://doi.org/10.1186/s12888-017-1372-5
Richardson JD, et al. Insomnia, Psychiatric Disorders and Suicidal Ideation in a National Representative Sample of Active Canadian Forces Members. BMC Psychiatry. 2017 06 6;17(1):211. PubMed PMID: 28583100.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Insomnia, psychiatric disorders and suicidal ideation in a National Representative Sample of active Canadian Forces members. AU - Richardson,J D, AU - Thompson,A, AU - King,L, AU - Corbett,B, AU - Shnaider,P, AU - St Cyr,K, AU - Nelson,C, AU - Sareen,J, AU - Elhai,J, AU - Zamorski,M, Y1 - 2017/06/06/ PY - 2016/11/24/received PY - 2017/05/26/accepted PY - 2017/6/7/entrez PY - 2017/6/7/pubmed PY - 2018/1/25/medline KW - Depression KW - Insomnia KW - Mental health KW - Military KW - Posttraumatic stress disorder KW - Sleep KW - Suicidal ideation SP - 211 EP - 211 JF - BMC psychiatry JO - BMC Psychiatry VL - 17 IS - 1 N2 - BACKGROUND: Past research on the association between insomnia and suicidal ideation (SI) has produced mixed findings. The current study explored the relationship between insomnia, SI, and past-year mental health status among a large Canadian Forces (CF) sample. METHOD: Data was obtained from the 2013 Canadian Forces Mental Health Survey (CFMHS), and included a large representative sample of Canadian Regular Forces personnel (N = 6700). A series of univariate logistic regressions were conducted to test individual associations between past-year mental health status, insomnia, and potential confounds and SI. Mental health status included three groups: 0, 1, or two or more probable diagnoses of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), major depressive disorder (MDD), generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), panic disorder (PD) and alcohol abuse/dependence. Stepwise multivariate logistic regression was used to assess the relationship between insomnia and SI with mental health status as a moderator. RESULTS: 40.8% of respondents reported experiencing insomnia. Both insomnia and number of mental health conditions incrementally increased the risk of SI. However, past-year mental health status was a significant moderator of this relationship, such that for CF personnel with either no (AOR = 1.61, 1.37-1.89) or only one past-year mental health condition (AOR = 1.39, 1.12-1.73), an incremental increase in insomnia was associated with an increased likelihood of SI. However, in personnel with two or more past-year mental health disorders, insomnia was no longer significantly associated with SI (AOR = 1.04, 0.81-1.33). CONCLUSIONS: Insomnia significantly increased the odds of SI, but only among individuals with no or one mental health condition. Findings highlight the importance of assessing insomnia among CF members in order to further suicide prevention efforts. SN - 1471-244X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28583100/Insomnia_psychiatric_disorders_and_suicidal_ideation_in_a_National_Representative_Sample_of_active_Canadian_Forces_members_ L2 - https://bmcpsychiatry.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12888-017-1372-5 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -