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Association between store food environment and customer purchases in small grocery stores, gas-marts, pharmacies and dollar stores.
Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act. 2017 06 05; 14(1):76.IJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Purchases at small/non-traditional food stores tend to have poor nutritional quality, and have been associated with poor health outcomes, including increased obesity risk The purpose of this study was to examine whether customers who shop at small/non-traditional food stores with more health promoting features make healthier purchases.

METHODS

In a cross-sectional design, data collectors assessed store features in a sample of 99 small and non-traditional food stores not participating in the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) in Minneapolis/St. Paul, MN in 2014. Customer intercept interviews (n = 594) collected purchase data from a bag check and demographics from a survey. Store measures included fruit/vegetable and whole grain availability, an overall Healthy Food Supply Score (HFSS), healthy food advertisements and in-store placement, and shelf space of key items. Customer nutritional measures were analyzed using Nutrient Databases System for Research (NDSR), and included the purchase of ≥1 serving of fruits/vegetables; ≥1 serving of whole grains; and overall Healthy Eating Index-2010 (HEI-2010) score for foods/beverages purchased. Associations between store and customer measures were estimated in multilevel linear and logistic regression models, controlling for customer characteristics and store type.

RESULTS

Few customers purchased fruits and vegetables (8%) or whole grains (8%). In fully adjusted models, purchase HEI-2010 scores were associated with fruit/vegetable shelf space (p = 0.002) and the ratio of shelf space devoted to healthy vs. less healthy items (p = 0.0002). Offering ≥14 varieties of fruit/vegetables was associated with produce purchases (OR 3.9, 95% CI 1.2-12.3), as was having produce visible from the store entrance (OR 2.3 95% CI 1.0 to 5.8), but whole grain availability measures were not associated with whole grain purchases.

CONCLUSIONS

Strategies addressing both customer demand and the availability of healthy food may be necessary to improve customer purchases.

TRIAL REGISTRATION

ClinialTrials.gov: NCT02774330 . Registered May 4, 2016 (retrospectively registered).

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Family Medicine and Community Health, Program in Health Disparities Research, University of Minnesota, 717 Delaware St. SE, Minneapolis, MN, 55414, USA. cecaspi@umn.edu.Division of Epidemiology and Community Health, Suite 300, University of Minnesota, 1300 South 2nd St, Minneapolis, MN, 55454, USA.Statewide Health Improvement Program, Minnesota Department of Health, Saint Paul, MN, 55164, USA.Division of Epidemiology and Community Health, Suite 300, University of Minnesota, 1300 South 2nd St, Minneapolis, MN, 55454, USA.Division of Epidemiology and Community Health, Suite 300, University of Minnesota, 1300 South 2nd St, Minneapolis, MN, 55454, USA.Division of Epidemiology and Community Health, Suite 300, University of Minnesota, 1300 South 2nd St, Minneapolis, MN, 55454, USA.Division of Epidemiology and Community Health, Suite 300, University of Minnesota, 1300 South 2nd St, Minneapolis, MN, 55454, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

28583131

Citation

Caspi, Caitlin E., et al. "Association Between Store Food Environment and Customer Purchases in Small Grocery Stores, Gas-marts, Pharmacies and Dollar Stores." The International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, vol. 14, no. 1, 2017, p. 76.
Caspi CE, Lenk K, Pelletier JE, et al. Association between store food environment and customer purchases in small grocery stores, gas-marts, pharmacies and dollar stores. Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act. 2017;14(1):76.
Caspi, C. E., Lenk, K., Pelletier, J. E., Barnes, T. L., Harnack, L., Erickson, D. J., & Laska, M. N. (2017). Association between store food environment and customer purchases in small grocery stores, gas-marts, pharmacies and dollar stores. The International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, 14(1), 76. https://doi.org/10.1186/s12966-017-0531-x
Caspi CE, et al. Association Between Store Food Environment and Customer Purchases in Small Grocery Stores, Gas-marts, Pharmacies and Dollar Stores. Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act. 2017 06 5;14(1):76. PubMed PMID: 28583131.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Association between store food environment and customer purchases in small grocery stores, gas-marts, pharmacies and dollar stores. AU - Caspi,Caitlin E, AU - Lenk,Kathleen, AU - Pelletier,Jennifer E, AU - Barnes,Timothy L, AU - Harnack,Lisa, AU - Erickson,Darin J, AU - Laska,Melissa N, Y1 - 2017/06/05/ PY - 2017/02/03/received PY - 2017/05/26/accepted PY - 2017/6/7/entrez PY - 2017/6/7/pubmed PY - 2017/12/2/medline KW - Community nutrition KW - Corner stores KW - Customer purchases KW - Healthy Eating Index SP - 76 EP - 76 JF - The international journal of behavioral nutrition and physical activity JO - Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act VL - 14 IS - 1 N2 - BACKGROUND: Purchases at small/non-traditional food stores tend to have poor nutritional quality, and have been associated with poor health outcomes, including increased obesity risk The purpose of this study was to examine whether customers who shop at small/non-traditional food stores with more health promoting features make healthier purchases. METHODS: In a cross-sectional design, data collectors assessed store features in a sample of 99 small and non-traditional food stores not participating in the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) in Minneapolis/St. Paul, MN in 2014. Customer intercept interviews (n = 594) collected purchase data from a bag check and demographics from a survey. Store measures included fruit/vegetable and whole grain availability, an overall Healthy Food Supply Score (HFSS), healthy food advertisements and in-store placement, and shelf space of key items. Customer nutritional measures were analyzed using Nutrient Databases System for Research (NDSR), and included the purchase of ≥1 serving of fruits/vegetables; ≥1 serving of whole grains; and overall Healthy Eating Index-2010 (HEI-2010) score for foods/beverages purchased. Associations between store and customer measures were estimated in multilevel linear and logistic regression models, controlling for customer characteristics and store type. RESULTS: Few customers purchased fruits and vegetables (8%) or whole grains (8%). In fully adjusted models, purchase HEI-2010 scores were associated with fruit/vegetable shelf space (p = 0.002) and the ratio of shelf space devoted to healthy vs. less healthy items (p = 0.0002). Offering ≥14 varieties of fruit/vegetables was associated with produce purchases (OR 3.9, 95% CI 1.2-12.3), as was having produce visible from the store entrance (OR 2.3 95% CI 1.0 to 5.8), but whole grain availability measures were not associated with whole grain purchases. CONCLUSIONS: Strategies addressing both customer demand and the availability of healthy food may be necessary to improve customer purchases. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinialTrials.gov: NCT02774330 . Registered May 4, 2016 (retrospectively registered). SN - 1479-5868 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28583131/Association_between_store_food_environment_and_customer_purchases_in_small_grocery_stores_gas_marts_pharmacies_and_dollar_stores_ L2 - https://ijbnpa.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12966-017-0531-x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -