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Serum bile acid level and fatty acid composition in Chinese children with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.
J Dig Dis 2017; 18(8):461-471JD

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To determine serum bile acid (BA) and fatty acid (FA) profiles in Chinese children with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD).

METHODS

A total 76 children aged 4-17 years were categorized into three groups according to the presence and absence of as well as the severity of NAFLD, that is, non-NAFLD (control), mild and moderate to severe NAFLD groups, respectively, based on their liver ultrasonography findings. Serum BA and FA profiles were quantified separately by mass spectrometry and gas chromatography. General linear models were performed to assess the differences among the groups.

RESULTS

After adjusted for potential confounders, children with NAFLD had higher levels of chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA), unconjugated primary BAs (CDCA + cholic acid) but lower levels of deoxycholic acid (DCA), taurodeoxycholic acid (TDCA), glycodeoxycholic acid (GDCA), total DCA (DCA + TDCA + GDCA), glycolithocholic acid (GLCA) and total lithocholic acid (GLCA + taurolithocholic acid) than children without NAFLD. As for FAs, children with mild and moderate to severe NAFLD had higher levels of n-7 monounsaturated FA.

CONCLUSIONS

Circulating BA and FA profiles may change in children with NAFLD. Further studies are needed to determine their associations and to understand the underlying mechanism of action.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Clinical Nutrition, Xin Hua Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, China. Department of Pediatric Surgery, Xin Hua Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, China. Shanghai Key Laboratory of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition, Shanghai, China. Shanghai Institute of Pediatric Research, Shanghai, China. Department of Clinical Nutrition, Ren Ji Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, China.Department of Clinical Nutrition, Ren Ji Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, China.Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health-Bloomington, Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana, USA.Shanghai Key Laboratory of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition, Shanghai, China. Shanghai Institute of Pediatric Research, Shanghai, China.Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health-Bloomington, Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana, USA.Department of Pediatric Surgery, Xin Hua Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, China. Shanghai Key Laboratory of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition, Shanghai, China. Shanghai Institute of Pediatric Research, Shanghai, China.Department of Pediatric Surgery, Xin Hua Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, China. Shanghai Key Laboratory of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition, Shanghai, China. Shanghai Institute of Pediatric Research, Shanghai, China.Department of Ultrasonic Medicine, Ren Ji Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, China.Department of Laboratory Medicine, Ren Ji Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, China.Department of Clinical Nutrition, Ren Ji Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, China.Department of Clinical Nutrition, Ren Ji Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, China.Department of Clinical Nutrition, Ren Ji Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, China.Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health-Bloomington, Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana, USA.Department of Clinical Nutrition, Xin Hua Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, China. Department of Pediatric Surgery, Xin Hua Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, China. Shanghai Key Laboratory of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition, Shanghai, China. Shanghai Institute of Pediatric Research, Shanghai, China.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Multicenter Study

Language

eng

PubMed ID

28585279

Citation

Lu, Li Ping, et al. "Serum Bile Acid Level and Fatty Acid Composition in Chinese Children With Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease." Journal of Digestive Diseases, vol. 18, no. 8, 2017, pp. 461-471.
Lu LP, Wan YP, Xun PC, et al. Serum bile acid level and fatty acid composition in Chinese children with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. J Dig Dis. 2017;18(8):461-471.
Lu, L. P., Wan, Y. P., Xun, P. C., Zhou, K. J., Chen, C., Cheng, S. Y., ... Cai, W. (2017). Serum bile acid level and fatty acid composition in Chinese children with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Journal of Digestive Diseases, 18(8), pp. 461-471. doi:10.1111/1751-2980.12494.
Lu LP, et al. Serum Bile Acid Level and Fatty Acid Composition in Chinese Children With Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease. J Dig Dis. 2017;18(8):461-471. PubMed PMID: 28585279.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Serum bile acid level and fatty acid composition in Chinese children with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. AU - Lu,Li Ping, AU - Wan,Yan Ping, AU - Xun,Peng Cheng, AU - Zhou,Ke Jun, AU - Chen,Cheng, AU - Cheng,Si Yang, AU - Zhang,Min Zhong, AU - Wu,Chun Hua, AU - Lin,Wei Wei, AU - Jiang,Ying, AU - Feng,Hai Xia, AU - Wang,Jia Lu, AU - He,Ka, AU - Cai,Wei, PY - 2017/04/11/received PY - 2017/05/16/revised PY - 2017/06/01/accepted PY - 2017/6/7/pubmed PY - 2018/6/5/medline PY - 2017/6/7/entrez KW - bile acids KW - children KW - fatty acids KW - non-alcoholic fatty liver disease SP - 461 EP - 471 JF - Journal of digestive diseases JO - J Dig Dis VL - 18 IS - 8 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To determine serum bile acid (BA) and fatty acid (FA) profiles in Chinese children with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). METHODS: A total 76 children aged 4-17 years were categorized into three groups according to the presence and absence of as well as the severity of NAFLD, that is, non-NAFLD (control), mild and moderate to severe NAFLD groups, respectively, based on their liver ultrasonography findings. Serum BA and FA profiles were quantified separately by mass spectrometry and gas chromatography. General linear models were performed to assess the differences among the groups. RESULTS: After adjusted for potential confounders, children with NAFLD had higher levels of chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA), unconjugated primary BAs (CDCA + cholic acid) but lower levels of deoxycholic acid (DCA), taurodeoxycholic acid (TDCA), glycodeoxycholic acid (GDCA), total DCA (DCA + TDCA + GDCA), glycolithocholic acid (GLCA) and total lithocholic acid (GLCA + taurolithocholic acid) than children without NAFLD. As for FAs, children with mild and moderate to severe NAFLD had higher levels of n-7 monounsaturated FA. CONCLUSIONS: Circulating BA and FA profiles may change in children with NAFLD. Further studies are needed to determine their associations and to understand the underlying mechanism of action. SN - 1751-2980 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28585279/Serum_bile_acid_level_and_fatty_acid_composition_in_Chinese_children_with_non_alcoholic_fatty_liver_disease_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/1751-2980.12494 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -