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Tea Drinking and Its Association with Active Tuberculosis Incidence among Middle-Aged and Elderly Adults: The Singapore Chinese Health Study.
Nutrients 2017; 9(6)N

Abstract

Experimental studies showed that tea polyphenols may inhibit growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. However, no prospective epidemiologic study has investigated tea drinking and the risk of active tuberculosis. We investigated this association in the Singapore Chinese Health Study, a prospective population-based cohort of 63,257 Chinese aged 45-74 years recruited between 1993 and 1998 in Singapore. Information on habitual drinking of tea (including black and green tea) and coffee was collected via structured questionnaires. Incident cases of active tuberculosis were identified via linkage with the nationwide tuberculosis registry up to 31 December 2014. Cox proportional hazard models were used to estimate the relation of tea and coffee consumption with tuberculosis risk. Over a mean 16.8 years of follow-up, we identified 1249 incident cases of active tuberculosis. Drinking either black or green tea was associated with a dose-dependent reduction in tuberculosis risk. Compared to non-drinkers, the hazard ratio (HR) (95% confidence interval (CI)) was 1.01 (0.85-1.21) in monthly tea drinkers, 0.84 (0.73-0.98) in weekly drinkers, and 0.82 (0.71-0.96) in daily drinkers (p for trend = 0.003). Coffee or caffeine intake was not significantly associated with tuberculosis risk. In conclusion, regular tea drinking was associated with a reduced risk of active tuberculosis.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Saw Swee Hock School of Public Health, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117549, Singapore. avril.soh@u.nus.edu.Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Ministry of Education Key Laboratory of Environment and Health, and State Key Laboratory of Environmental Health (incubation), School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430030, China. panan@hust.edu.cn.Singapore Tuberculosis Control Unit, Tan Tock Seng Hospital, Singapore 308089, Singapore. cynthia_chee@ttsh.com.sg.Singapore Tuberculosis Control Unit, Tan Tock Seng Hospital, Singapore 308089, Singapore. yee_tang_wang@ttsh.com.sg.Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, and Department of Epidemiology, University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health, Pittsburgh, PA 15261, USA. yuanj@upmc.edu.Saw Swee Hock School of Public Health, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117549, Singapore. woonpuay.koh@duke-nus.edu.sg. Office of Clinical Sciences, Duke-NUS Medical School, 8 College Road, Singapore 169857, Singapore. woonpuay.koh@duke-nus.edu.sg.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

28587081

Citation

Soh, Avril Zixin, et al. "Tea Drinking and Its Association With Active Tuberculosis Incidence Among Middle-Aged and Elderly Adults: the Singapore Chinese Health Study." Nutrients, vol. 9, no. 6, 2017.
Soh AZ, Pan A, Chee CBE, et al. Tea Drinking and Its Association with Active Tuberculosis Incidence among Middle-Aged and Elderly Adults: The Singapore Chinese Health Study. Nutrients. 2017;9(6).
Soh, A. Z., Pan, A., Chee, C. B. E., Wang, Y. T., Yuan, J. M., & Koh, W. P. (2017). Tea Drinking and Its Association with Active Tuberculosis Incidence among Middle-Aged and Elderly Adults: The Singapore Chinese Health Study. Nutrients, 9(6), doi:10.3390/nu9060544.
Soh AZ, et al. Tea Drinking and Its Association With Active Tuberculosis Incidence Among Middle-Aged and Elderly Adults: the Singapore Chinese Health Study. Nutrients. 2017 May 25;9(6) PubMed PMID: 28587081.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Tea Drinking and Its Association with Active Tuberculosis Incidence among Middle-Aged and Elderly Adults: The Singapore Chinese Health Study. AU - Soh,Avril Zixin, AU - Pan,An, AU - Chee,Cynthia Bin Eng, AU - Wang,Yee-Tang, AU - Yuan,Jian-Min, AU - Koh,Woon-Puay, Y1 - 2017/05/25/ PY - 2017/01/18/received PY - 2017/05/17/revised PY - 2017/05/23/accepted PY - 2017/6/8/entrez PY - 2017/6/8/pubmed PY - 2018/3/20/medline KW - epidemiology KW - tea KW - tuberculosis JF - Nutrients JO - Nutrients VL - 9 IS - 6 N2 - Experimental studies showed that tea polyphenols may inhibit growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. However, no prospective epidemiologic study has investigated tea drinking and the risk of active tuberculosis. We investigated this association in the Singapore Chinese Health Study, a prospective population-based cohort of 63,257 Chinese aged 45-74 years recruited between 1993 and 1998 in Singapore. Information on habitual drinking of tea (including black and green tea) and coffee was collected via structured questionnaires. Incident cases of active tuberculosis were identified via linkage with the nationwide tuberculosis registry up to 31 December 2014. Cox proportional hazard models were used to estimate the relation of tea and coffee consumption with tuberculosis risk. Over a mean 16.8 years of follow-up, we identified 1249 incident cases of active tuberculosis. Drinking either black or green tea was associated with a dose-dependent reduction in tuberculosis risk. Compared to non-drinkers, the hazard ratio (HR) (95% confidence interval (CI)) was 1.01 (0.85-1.21) in monthly tea drinkers, 0.84 (0.73-0.98) in weekly drinkers, and 0.82 (0.71-0.96) in daily drinkers (p for trend = 0.003). Coffee or caffeine intake was not significantly associated with tuberculosis risk. In conclusion, regular tea drinking was associated with a reduced risk of active tuberculosis. SN - 2072-6643 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28587081/Tea_Drinking_and_Its_Association_with_Active_Tuberculosis_Incidence_among_Middle_Aged_and_Elderly_Adults:_The_Singapore_Chinese_Health_Study_ L2 - http://www.mdpi.com/resolver?pii=nu9060544 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -