Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Childhood Falls With Occipital Impacts.
Pediatr Emerg Care. 2018 Dec; 34(12):837-841.PE

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

Falls are commonly reported in children who present with both accidental and inflicted brain injuries. Short falls rarely result in serious or life-threatening injuries. Our purpose is to describe a series of cases of short falls with occipital impact leading to subdural hemorrhage (SDH).

METHODS

We present a series of 8 witnessed accounts of young children diagnosed as having SDHs after striking the back of their heads during a short fall. Child-abuse physicians were surveyed to determine if they had evaluated a child younger than 24 months diagnosed as having SDH, with or without retinal hemorrhages, following a witnessed fall with occipital impact. Submitted cases were analyzed.

RESULTS

The median age of the children was 12.5 months. All fell backward from a standing or seated position onto a hard surface and immediately developed symptoms. There was an average of 4 witnesses per case. Physical examinations were normal; however, the majority of children had enlarged head circumferences. All were previously healthy. Six of 8 children had unilateral convexity SDH. All children had varying degrees of retinal hemorrhage but no retinoschisis. The majority of children had returned to their baseline within 24 hours of hospitalization.

CONCLUSIONS

Although a larger study is needed to identify the full spectrum of injuries, we postulate that, if a history of a fall with an occipital impact is elicited during a trauma workup, accidental injury should be considered.

Authors+Show Affiliations

No affiliation info availableEmma Children's Hospital-Academic Medical Center Amsterdam, the Netherlands.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

28590993

Citation

Atkinson, Norrell, et al. "Childhood Falls With Occipital Impacts." Pediatric Emergency Care, vol. 34, no. 12, 2018, pp. 837-841.
Atkinson N, van Rijn RR, Starling SP. Childhood Falls With Occipital Impacts. Pediatr Emerg Care. 2018;34(12):837-841.
Atkinson, N., van Rijn, R. R., & Starling, S. P. (2018). Childhood Falls With Occipital Impacts. Pediatric Emergency Care, 34(12), 837-841. https://doi.org/10.1097/PEC.0000000000001186
Atkinson N, van Rijn RR, Starling SP. Childhood Falls With Occipital Impacts. Pediatr Emerg Care. 2018;34(12):837-841. PubMed PMID: 28590993.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Childhood Falls With Occipital Impacts. AU - Atkinson,Norrell, AU - van Rijn,Rick R, AU - Starling,Suzanne P, PY - 2017/6/8/pubmed PY - 2019/1/12/medline PY - 2017/6/8/entrez SP - 837 EP - 841 JF - Pediatric emergency care JO - Pediatr Emerg Care VL - 34 IS - 12 N2 - OBJECTIVES: Falls are commonly reported in children who present with both accidental and inflicted brain injuries. Short falls rarely result in serious or life-threatening injuries. Our purpose is to describe a series of cases of short falls with occipital impact leading to subdural hemorrhage (SDH). METHODS: We present a series of 8 witnessed accounts of young children diagnosed as having SDHs after striking the back of their heads during a short fall. Child-abuse physicians were surveyed to determine if they had evaluated a child younger than 24 months diagnosed as having SDH, with or without retinal hemorrhages, following a witnessed fall with occipital impact. Submitted cases were analyzed. RESULTS: The median age of the children was 12.5 months. All fell backward from a standing or seated position onto a hard surface and immediately developed symptoms. There was an average of 4 witnesses per case. Physical examinations were normal; however, the majority of children had enlarged head circumferences. All were previously healthy. Six of 8 children had unilateral convexity SDH. All children had varying degrees of retinal hemorrhage but no retinoschisis. The majority of children had returned to their baseline within 24 hours of hospitalization. CONCLUSIONS: Although a larger study is needed to identify the full spectrum of injuries, we postulate that, if a history of a fall with an occipital impact is elicited during a trauma workup, accidental injury should be considered. SN - 1535-1815 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28590993/Childhood_Falls_With_Occipital_Impacts L2 - http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PEC.0000000000001186 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -