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Trends in added sugars from packaged beverages available and purchased by US households, 2007-2012.
Am J Clin Nutr. 2017 Jul; 106(1):179-188.AJ

Abstract

Background:

The US Food and Drug Administration's updated nutrition labeling requirements will include added sugars starting in July 2018, but no measure currently exists to identify the added sugar content of products and what it represents among purchases. Beverages are one of the first targets for reducing added sugar consumption, and hence are the focus here.

Objective:

Our goal was to estimate trends in added sugars in nonalcoholic packaged beverage products available in the United States and to estimate amounts of added sugars obtained from these beverages given the purchases of US households overall and by subpopulations.

Design:

On the basis of nutrition label data from multiple sources, we used a stepwise approach to derive the added sugar content of 160,713 beverage products recorded as purchased by US households in 2007-2012 (345,193 observations from 110,539 unique households). We estimated the amounts of added sugars obtained from packaged beverages US households reported buying in 2007-2008, 2009-2010, and 2011-2012, overall and by subpopulations based on household composition, race/ethnicity, and income. The key outcomes are added sugars in terms of per capita grams per day and the percentage of calories from packaged beverages.

Results:

Packaged beverages alone account for per capita consumption of 12 g/d of added sugars purchased by US households in 2007-2012, representing 32-48% of calories from packaged beverages. Whereas the absolute amount of added sugars from beverages has not changed meaningfully over time, the relative contribution of added sugars to calories from beverages has increased. Non-Hispanic black households and low-income households obtain both higher absolute and relative amounts of added sugars from beverages than non-Hispanic white households and high-income households (all P < 0.01).

Conclusions:

These results provide measures of added sugars from packaged beverages at both the product level and the population level in the United States and can be used for comparisons after the revised nutrition labels are implemented and for future monitoring.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Nutrition and shuwen@unc.edu. Carolina Population Center, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC.Carolina Population Center, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC.Carolina Population Center, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

28592597

Citation

Ng, Shu Wen, et al. "Trends in Added Sugars From Packaged Beverages Available and Purchased By US Households, 2007-2012." The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 106, no. 1, 2017, pp. 179-188.
Ng SW, Ostrowski JD, Li KP. Trends in added sugars from packaged beverages available and purchased by US households, 2007-2012. Am J Clin Nutr. 2017;106(1):179-188.
Ng, S. W., Ostrowski, J. D., & Li, K. P. (2017). Trends in added sugars from packaged beverages available and purchased by US households, 2007-2012. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 106(1), 179-188. https://doi.org/10.3945/ajcn.117.153858
Ng SW, Ostrowski JD, Li KP. Trends in Added Sugars From Packaged Beverages Available and Purchased By US Households, 2007-2012. Am J Clin Nutr. 2017;106(1):179-188. PubMed PMID: 28592597.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Trends in added sugars from packaged beverages available and purchased by US households, 2007-2012. AU - Ng,Shu Wen, AU - Ostrowski,Jessica D, AU - Li,Kuo-Ping, Y1 - 2017/06/07/ PY - 2017/01/30/received PY - 2017/04/26/accepted PY - 2017/6/9/pubmed PY - 2017/8/2/medline PY - 2017/6/9/entrez KW - United States KW - added sugars KW - beverages KW - monitoring KW - purchases SP - 179 EP - 188 JF - The American journal of clinical nutrition JO - Am J Clin Nutr VL - 106 IS - 1 N2 - Background: The US Food and Drug Administration's updated nutrition labeling requirements will include added sugars starting in July 2018, but no measure currently exists to identify the added sugar content of products and what it represents among purchases. Beverages are one of the first targets for reducing added sugar consumption, and hence are the focus here.Objective: Our goal was to estimate trends in added sugars in nonalcoholic packaged beverage products available in the United States and to estimate amounts of added sugars obtained from these beverages given the purchases of US households overall and by subpopulations.Design: On the basis of nutrition label data from multiple sources, we used a stepwise approach to derive the added sugar content of 160,713 beverage products recorded as purchased by US households in 2007-2012 (345,193 observations from 110,539 unique households). We estimated the amounts of added sugars obtained from packaged beverages US households reported buying in 2007-2008, 2009-2010, and 2011-2012, overall and by subpopulations based on household composition, race/ethnicity, and income. The key outcomes are added sugars in terms of per capita grams per day and the percentage of calories from packaged beverages.Results: Packaged beverages alone account for per capita consumption of 12 g/d of added sugars purchased by US households in 2007-2012, representing 32-48% of calories from packaged beverages. Whereas the absolute amount of added sugars from beverages has not changed meaningfully over time, the relative contribution of added sugars to calories from beverages has increased. Non-Hispanic black households and low-income households obtain both higher absolute and relative amounts of added sugars from beverages than non-Hispanic white households and high-income households (all P < 0.01).Conclusions: These results provide measures of added sugars from packaged beverages at both the product level and the population level in the United States and can be used for comparisons after the revised nutrition labels are implemented and for future monitoring. SN - 1938-3207 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28592597/Trends_in_added_sugars_from_packaged_beverages_available_and_purchased_by_US_households_2007_2012_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/ajcn/article-lookup/doi/10.3945/ajcn.117.153858 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -