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Food Insecurity and Pre-diabetes in Adults: Race/Ethnic and Sex Differences.
Am J Health Behav. 2017 Jul 01; 41(4):428-436.AJ

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

We examined sex and race/ethnicity differences in the association between food insecurity status and prediabetes among adults.

METHOD

We used cross-sectional 2011 and 2012 National Health Interview Survey data on non-Hispanic white, non-Hispanic black, and Hispanic adults aged 18-59 years whose household income was ≤ 299% Federal Poverty Line (N = 19,048). Food insecurity status was determined by 3 or more affirmative responses on the 10-item USDA Food Security Scale. Pre-diabetes was self-reported. Logistic regression analyses were used to estimate associations of food insecurity with pre-diabetes and adjusted for several demographic characteristics. All models were stratified by sex and race/ethnicity.

RESULTS

In adjusted models, food insecure non-Hispanic white women and non-Hispanic black women had 53% and over 200% higher odds of being pre-diabetic, respectively. Food insecurity was not related to pre-diabetes for Hispanic women or men.

CONCLUSION

Limited food resources appear to place non-Hispanic white and non-Hispanic black women at risk for pre-diabetes. Linking food assistance programs with community-based health education programs may be a comprehensive approach to support those who are food insecure with diabetes prevention.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Assistant Professor, The University of Houston, Department of Psychological, Health, and Learning Sciences, Houston, TX;, Email: rmurillo3@uh.edu.Research Assistant, The University of Houston, Department of Health and Human Performance, Houston, TX.Clinical Assistant Professor, The University of Houston, Department of Health and Human Performance, Houston, TX.Assistant Professor, The University of Houston, Department of Health and Human Performance, Houston, TX.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

28601102

Citation

Murillo, Rosenda, et al. "Food Insecurity and Pre-diabetes in Adults: Race/Ethnic and Sex Differences." American Journal of Health Behavior, vol. 41, no. 4, 2017, pp. 428-436.
Murillo R, Reesor LM, Scott CW, et al. Food Insecurity and Pre-diabetes in Adults: Race/Ethnic and Sex Differences. Am J Health Behav. 2017;41(4):428-436.
Murillo, R., Reesor, L. M., Scott, C. W., & Hernandez, D. C. (2017). Food Insecurity and Pre-diabetes in Adults: Race/Ethnic and Sex Differences. American Journal of Health Behavior, 41(4), 428-436. https://doi.org/10.5993/AJHB.41.4.7
Murillo R, et al. Food Insecurity and Pre-diabetes in Adults: Race/Ethnic and Sex Differences. Am J Health Behav. 2017 Jul 1;41(4):428-436. PubMed PMID: 28601102.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Food Insecurity and Pre-diabetes in Adults: Race/Ethnic and Sex Differences. AU - Murillo,Rosenda, AU - Reesor,Layton M, AU - Scott,Claudia W, AU - Hernandez,Daphne C, PY - 2017/6/12/entrez PY - 2017/6/12/pubmed PY - 2018/4/3/medline SP - 428 EP - 436 JF - American journal of health behavior JO - Am J Health Behav VL - 41 IS - 4 N2 - OBJECTIVE: We examined sex and race/ethnicity differences in the association between food insecurity status and prediabetes among adults. METHOD: We used cross-sectional 2011 and 2012 National Health Interview Survey data on non-Hispanic white, non-Hispanic black, and Hispanic adults aged 18-59 years whose household income was ≤ 299% Federal Poverty Line (N = 19,048). Food insecurity status was determined by 3 or more affirmative responses on the 10-item USDA Food Security Scale. Pre-diabetes was self-reported. Logistic regression analyses were used to estimate associations of food insecurity with pre-diabetes and adjusted for several demographic characteristics. All models were stratified by sex and race/ethnicity. RESULTS: In adjusted models, food insecure non-Hispanic white women and non-Hispanic black women had 53% and over 200% higher odds of being pre-diabetic, respectively. Food insecurity was not related to pre-diabetes for Hispanic women or men. CONCLUSION: Limited food resources appear to place non-Hispanic white and non-Hispanic black women at risk for pre-diabetes. Linking food assistance programs with community-based health education programs may be a comprehensive approach to support those who are food insecure with diabetes prevention. SN - 1945-7359 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28601102/Food_Insecurity_and_Pre_diabetes_in_Adults:_Race/Ethnic_and_Sex_Differences_ L2 - https://www.ingentaconnect.com/openurl?genre=article&issn=1945-7359&volume=41&issue=4&spage=428&aulast=Murillo DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -