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Myth of the marsupial mother: home care of very low birth weight babies in Bogota, Colombia.
Lancet. 1985 May 25; 1(8439):1206-8.Lct

Abstract

Because of the shortage of equipment and staff and the frequency of cross-infection in hospital, paediatricians at San Juan de Dios Hospital, Bogota, have been sending home babies weighing as little as 700 g, cared for between the mother's breasts in a vertical position and fed only on mother's milk ("kangaroo babies"). Infants as immature as 32 weeks gestation were successfully cared for at home in this way. Mother's milk was supplemented with guava juice and later with soup, but mean time to regain birth weight was 36 days. The previously publicised high survival figures for this home-care programme were found to be misleading because they omitted babies who had died in the first few days after birth. Although this approach is valuable in developing countries, home care of very low birth weight babies would not improve survival in industrialised nations. Nevertheless, care of such tiny infants in special care baby units in developed countries could benefit from similar emphasis on education and motivation of mothers and early skin-to-skin contact.

Authors

No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

2860400

Citation

Whitelaw, A, and K Sleath. "Myth of the Marsupial Mother: Home Care of Very Low Birth Weight Babies in Bogota, Colombia." Lancet (London, England), vol. 1, no. 8439, 1985, pp. 1206-8.
Whitelaw A, Sleath K. Myth of the marsupial mother: home care of very low birth weight babies in Bogota, Colombia. Lancet. 1985;1(8439):1206-8.
Whitelaw, A., & Sleath, K. (1985). Myth of the marsupial mother: home care of very low birth weight babies in Bogota, Colombia. Lancet (London, England), 1(8439), 1206-8.
Whitelaw A, Sleath K. Myth of the Marsupial Mother: Home Care of Very Low Birth Weight Babies in Bogota, Colombia. Lancet. 1985 May 25;1(8439):1206-8. PubMed PMID: 2860400.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Myth of the marsupial mother: home care of very low birth weight babies in Bogota, Colombia. AU - Whitelaw,A, AU - Sleath,K, PY - 1985/5/25/pubmed PY - 1985/5/25/medline PY - 1985/5/25/entrez KW - Americas KW - Anthropometry KW - Biology KW - Birth Weight KW - Body Weight KW - Child Development KW - Child Health Services KW - Colombia KW - Delivery Of Health Care KW - Demographic Factors KW - Developed Countries KW - Developing Countries KW - Education KW - Family And Household KW - Family Characteristics KW - Family Relationships KW - Growth KW - Health KW - Health Education KW - Health Services KW - Immunization KW - Infant Mortality KW - Infant Nutrition KW - Latin America KW - Maternal-child Health Services KW - Measurement KW - Medicine KW - Mortality KW - Mothers KW - Nutrition KW - Parents KW - Physiology KW - Population KW - Population Dynamics KW - Preventive Medicine KW - Primary Health Care KW - Research Methodology KW - South America SP - 1206 EP - 8 JF - Lancet (London, England) JO - Lancet VL - 1 IS - 8439 N2 - Because of the shortage of equipment and staff and the frequency of cross-infection in hospital, paediatricians at San Juan de Dios Hospital, Bogota, have been sending home babies weighing as little as 700 g, cared for between the mother's breasts in a vertical position and fed only on mother's milk ("kangaroo babies"). Infants as immature as 32 weeks gestation were successfully cared for at home in this way. Mother's milk was supplemented with guava juice and later with soup, but mean time to regain birth weight was 36 days. The previously publicised high survival figures for this home-care programme were found to be misleading because they omitted babies who had died in the first few days after birth. Although this approach is valuable in developing countries, home care of very low birth weight babies would not improve survival in industrialised nations. Nevertheless, care of such tiny infants in special care baby units in developed countries could benefit from similar emphasis on education and motivation of mothers and early skin-to-skin contact. SN - 0140-6736 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/2860400/Myth_of_the_marsupial_mother:_home_care_of_very_low_birth_weight_babies_in_Bogota_Colombia_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0140-6736(85)92877-6 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -