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Associations of Bullying and Cyberbullying With Substance Use and Sexual Risk Taking in Young Adults.
J Nurs Scholarsh. 2017 07; 49(4):360-370.JN

Abstract

PURPOSE

This study aims at identifying the sex-stratified associations of involvement in traditional bullying during middle and high school years and in cyberbullying during college years with multiple health risk behaviors in undergraduate students.

DESIGN

This cross-sectional analysis draws on the data of the second wave of the LATO study (Lifestyle & Attitudes in a Student Population) in Greece.

METHODS

During November and December 2013, 812 second-year undergraduate students (mean age = 19.3 years; girls = 66.1%) provided data on substance use (smoking, alcohol abuse or drunkenness, illegal drug use including marijuana, hashish, and cannabis) and sexual risk taking (paying for sex and not using condoms) and completed the Cyberbullying and its Effects and the Retrospective Bullying Questionnaires. Logistic regression models performed were adjusted for potential confounders.

FINDINGS

Both male and female late adolescents who were victims of bullying during middle and high school were less likely to use condoms during college years when compared to uninvolved students. Among males, being a bully or victim at school doubled the odds for past month drunkenness and tripled the odds of paying for sex. Greater likelihood to pay for sex was also evident in bullying victims. Cyberbully or cybervictim male students were more likely to report smoking. In female bullying victims, alcohol abuse associations were somewhat conflicting, with decreased lifetime but increased past month likelihood for drunkenness.

CONCLUSIONS

Engagement in bullying and cyberbullying is associated with the manifestation of gender-specific health risk behaviors for the different involvement groups in college students.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Involvement in bullying and cyberbullying is a major public health concern due to the associations with multiple health risk behaviors. Nurses and healthcare professionals should adopt multifaceted prevention interventions tailored according to bullying status and gender that extend through all educational levels.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Assistant Professor, Public Health Nursing-Social Epidemiology, Laboratory of Epidemiology, Prevention and Management of Diseases, Nursing Department, Technological Educational Institute (TEI) of Crete, Heraklion, Crete, Greece.Researcher, Laboratory of Epidemiology, Prevention and Management of Diseases, Nursing Department, Technological Educational Institute (TEI) of Crete, Heraklion, Crete, Greece.Researcher, Laboratory of Epidemiology, Prevention and Management of Diseases, Nursing Department, Technological Educational Institute (TEI) of Crete, Heraklion, Crete, Greece.Professor, Department of Social Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Crete, Heraklion, Crete, Greece.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

28605163

Citation

Kritsotakis, George, et al. "Associations of Bullying and Cyberbullying With Substance Use and Sexual Risk Taking in Young Adults." Journal of Nursing Scholarship : an Official Publication of Sigma Theta Tau International Honor Society of Nursing, vol. 49, no. 4, 2017, pp. 360-370.
Kritsotakis G, Papanikolaou M, Androulakis E, et al. Associations of Bullying and Cyberbullying With Substance Use and Sexual Risk Taking in Young Adults. J Nurs Scholarsh. 2017;49(4):360-370.
Kritsotakis, G., Papanikolaou, M., Androulakis, E., & Philalithis, A. E. (2017). Associations of Bullying and Cyberbullying With Substance Use and Sexual Risk Taking in Young Adults. Journal of Nursing Scholarship : an Official Publication of Sigma Theta Tau International Honor Society of Nursing, 49(4), 360-370. https://doi.org/10.1111/jnu.12299
Kritsotakis G, et al. Associations of Bullying and Cyberbullying With Substance Use and Sexual Risk Taking in Young Adults. J Nurs Scholarsh. 2017;49(4):360-370. PubMed PMID: 28605163.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Associations of Bullying and Cyberbullying With Substance Use and Sexual Risk Taking in Young Adults. AU - Kritsotakis,George, AU - Papanikolaou,Maria, AU - Androulakis,Emmanouil, AU - Philalithis,Anastas E, Y1 - 2017/06/12/ PY - 2017/03/24/accepted PY - 2017/6/13/pubmed PY - 2017/11/29/medline PY - 2017/6/13/entrez KW - Adolescence KW - bullying KW - condom use KW - cyberbullying KW - drug use KW - health risk behaviours KW - smoking KW - substance use KW - undergraduate students KW - young adults SP - 360 EP - 370 JF - Journal of nursing scholarship : an official publication of Sigma Theta Tau International Honor Society of Nursing JO - J Nurs Scholarsh VL - 49 IS - 4 N2 - PURPOSE: This study aims at identifying the sex-stratified associations of involvement in traditional bullying during middle and high school years and in cyberbullying during college years with multiple health risk behaviors in undergraduate students. DESIGN: This cross-sectional analysis draws on the data of the second wave of the LATO study (Lifestyle & Attitudes in a Student Population) in Greece. METHODS: During November and December 2013, 812 second-year undergraduate students (mean age = 19.3 years; girls = 66.1%) provided data on substance use (smoking, alcohol abuse or drunkenness, illegal drug use including marijuana, hashish, and cannabis) and sexual risk taking (paying for sex and not using condoms) and completed the Cyberbullying and its Effects and the Retrospective Bullying Questionnaires. Logistic regression models performed were adjusted for potential confounders. FINDINGS: Both male and female late adolescents who were victims of bullying during middle and high school were less likely to use condoms during college years when compared to uninvolved students. Among males, being a bully or victim at school doubled the odds for past month drunkenness and tripled the odds of paying for sex. Greater likelihood to pay for sex was also evident in bullying victims. Cyberbully or cybervictim male students were more likely to report smoking. In female bullying victims, alcohol abuse associations were somewhat conflicting, with decreased lifetime but increased past month likelihood for drunkenness. CONCLUSIONS: Engagement in bullying and cyberbullying is associated with the manifestation of gender-specific health risk behaviors for the different involvement groups in college students. CLINICAL RELEVANCE: Involvement in bullying and cyberbullying is a major public health concern due to the associations with multiple health risk behaviors. Nurses and healthcare professionals should adopt multifaceted prevention interventions tailored according to bullying status and gender that extend through all educational levels. SN - 1547-5069 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28605163/Associations_of_Bullying_and_Cyberbullying_With_Substance_Use_and_Sexual_Risk_Taking_in_Young_Adults_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/jnu.12299 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -