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Hip rate of force development and strength are impaired in females with patellofemoral pain without signs of altered gluteus medius and maximus morphology.
J Sci Med Sport. 2018 Feb; 21(2):123-128.JS

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

To compare rate of force development (RFD) and isometric muscle strength of the hip abductors and extensors; and the thickness and the amount of non-contractile tissue of the gluteus medius and maximus between females with and without patellofemoral pain (PFP).

DESIGN

Cross-sectional study.

METHODS

Fifty-four physically active females (27 with PFP and 27 healthy individuals) were studied. Hip muscle isometric strength and RFD was evaluated using isokinetic dynamometry. RFD was measured until 30%, 60%, and 90% of the maximal isometric torque (MIT). Hip muscle morphology was evaluated using ultrasonography.

RESULTS

The PFP group possessed slower RFD compared to the control group by 33% for hip abductors until 90%MIT (-0.23%/ms, 95%CI -0.44 to -0.02, ES=0.59); by 51% for hip extensors until 30%MIT (-0.42%/ms, 95%CI -0.66 to -0.18, ES=0.97); and by 55% for hip extensors until 60%MIT (-0.36%/ms, 95%CI -0.60 to -0.12, ES=0.81). The PFP group possessed reduced isometric torque compared to the control group by 10% for hip abduction (-16.0Nm/kg×100, 95% CI -30.2 to -1.9, ES=0.61) and by 15% for hip extension (-30.1Nm/kg×100, 95%CI -51.4 to -8.9, ES=0.76). No significant between group differences for the thickness and the amount of non-contractile tissue of the gluteus medius and maximus were identified.

CONCLUSIONS

Females with PFP have deficits in isometric strength and RFD in hip abduction and extension. RFD deficits are greater than strength deficits which may highlight their potential importance. Hip muscle strength and RFD deficits do not appear to be explained by muscle thickness or proportion of non-contractile tissue of the gluteal musculature as measured by ultrasound.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Physiotherapy, São Carlos Federal University, Brazil; Sport and Exercise Medicine Research Centre, School of Allied Health, La Trobe University, Australia. Electronic address: nunesguilherme@live.com.Sport and Exercise Medicine Research Centre, School of Allied Health, La Trobe University, Australia.Department of Physiotherapy, São Carlos Federal University, Brazil.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

28606466

Citation

Nunes, Guilherme S., et al. "Hip Rate of Force Development and Strength Are Impaired in Females With Patellofemoral Pain Without Signs of Altered Gluteus Medius and Maximus Morphology." Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, vol. 21, no. 2, 2018, pp. 123-128.
Nunes GS, Barton CJ, Serrão FV. Hip rate of force development and strength are impaired in females with patellofemoral pain without signs of altered gluteus medius and maximus morphology. J Sci Med Sport. 2018;21(2):123-128.
Nunes, G. S., Barton, C. J., & Serrão, F. V. (2018). Hip rate of force development and strength are impaired in females with patellofemoral pain without signs of altered gluteus medius and maximus morphology. Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, 21(2), 123-128. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jsams.2017.05.014
Nunes GS, Barton CJ, Serrão FV. Hip Rate of Force Development and Strength Are Impaired in Females With Patellofemoral Pain Without Signs of Altered Gluteus Medius and Maximus Morphology. J Sci Med Sport. 2018;21(2):123-128. PubMed PMID: 28606466.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Hip rate of force development and strength are impaired in females with patellofemoral pain without signs of altered gluteus medius and maximus morphology. AU - Nunes,Guilherme S, AU - Barton,Christian John, AU - Serrão,Fábio Viadanna, Y1 - 2017/05/24/ PY - 2016/11/16/received PY - 2017/03/26/revised PY - 2017/05/15/accepted PY - 2017/6/14/pubmed PY - 2018/5/8/medline PY - 2017/6/14/entrez KW - Knee KW - Muscle power KW - Muscle strength dynamometer KW - Muscular atrophy SP - 123 EP - 128 JF - Journal of science and medicine in sport JO - J Sci Med Sport VL - 21 IS - 2 N2 - OBJECTIVES: To compare rate of force development (RFD) and isometric muscle strength of the hip abductors and extensors; and the thickness and the amount of non-contractile tissue of the gluteus medius and maximus between females with and without patellofemoral pain (PFP). DESIGN: Cross-sectional study. METHODS: Fifty-four physically active females (27 with PFP and 27 healthy individuals) were studied. Hip muscle isometric strength and RFD was evaluated using isokinetic dynamometry. RFD was measured until 30%, 60%, and 90% of the maximal isometric torque (MIT). Hip muscle morphology was evaluated using ultrasonography. RESULTS: The PFP group possessed slower RFD compared to the control group by 33% for hip abductors until 90%MIT (-0.23%/ms, 95%CI -0.44 to -0.02, ES=0.59); by 51% for hip extensors until 30%MIT (-0.42%/ms, 95%CI -0.66 to -0.18, ES=0.97); and by 55% for hip extensors until 60%MIT (-0.36%/ms, 95%CI -0.60 to -0.12, ES=0.81). The PFP group possessed reduced isometric torque compared to the control group by 10% for hip abduction (-16.0Nm/kg×100, 95% CI -30.2 to -1.9, ES=0.61) and by 15% for hip extension (-30.1Nm/kg×100, 95%CI -51.4 to -8.9, ES=0.76). No significant between group differences for the thickness and the amount of non-contractile tissue of the gluteus medius and maximus were identified. CONCLUSIONS: Females with PFP have deficits in isometric strength and RFD in hip abduction and extension. RFD deficits are greater than strength deficits which may highlight their potential importance. Hip muscle strength and RFD deficits do not appear to be explained by muscle thickness or proportion of non-contractile tissue of the gluteal musculature as measured by ultrasound. SN - 1878-1861 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28606466/Hip_rate_of_force_development_and_strength_are_impaired_in_females_with_patellofemoral_pain_without_signs_of_altered_gluteus_medius_and_maximus_morphology_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1440-2440(17)30440-1 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -