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Evolution of Complex Maillard Chemical Reactions, Resolved in Time.
Sci Rep. 2017 06 12; 7(1):3227.SR

Abstract

In this study, we monitored the thermal formation of early ribose-glycine Maillard reaction products over time by ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry. Here, we considered sugar decomposition (caramelization) apart from compounds that could only be produced in the presence of the amino acid. More than 300 intermediates as a result of the two initial reactants were found after ten hours (100 °C) to participate in the interplay of the Maillard reaction cascade. Despite the large numerical variety the majority of intermediates follow simple and repetitive reaction patterns. Dehydration, carbonyl cleavage, and redox reactions turned out to have a large impact on the diversity the Maillard reaction causes. Although the Amadori breakdown is considered as the main Maillard reaction pathway, other reactive intermediates, often of higher molecular weight than the Amadori rearrangement product, contribute to a large extent to the multitude of intermediates we observed.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Comprehensive Foodomics Platform, Analytical Food Chemistry, Technical University Munich, Alte Akademie 10, 85354, Freising, Germany. daniel.hemmler@tum.de. Research Unit Analytical BioGeoChemistry (BGC), Helmholtz Zentrum München, Ingolstädter Landstrasse 1, 85764, Neuherberg, Germany. daniel.hemmler@tum.de.Comprehensive Foodomics Platform, Analytical Food Chemistry, Technical University Munich, Alte Akademie 10, 85354, Freising, Germany. Research Unit Analytical BioGeoChemistry (BGC), Helmholtz Zentrum München, Ingolstädter Landstrasse 1, 85764, Neuherberg, Germany.The Waltham Centre for Pet Nutrition, Mars Petcare UK, Waltham-on-the-Wolds, Leicestershire, LE14 4RT, United Kingdom.Comprehensive Foodomics Platform, Analytical Food Chemistry, Technical University Munich, Alte Akademie 10, 85354, Freising, Germany. Research Unit Analytical BioGeoChemistry (BGC), Helmholtz Zentrum München, Ingolstädter Landstrasse 1, 85764, Neuherberg, Germany.The Waltham Centre for Pet Nutrition, Mars Petcare UK, Waltham-on-the-Wolds, Leicestershire, LE14 4RT, United Kingdom.Comprehensive Foodomics Platform, Analytical Food Chemistry, Technical University Munich, Alte Akademie 10, 85354, Freising, Germany. schmitt-kopplin@helmholtz-muenchen.de. Research Unit Analytical BioGeoChemistry (BGC), Helmholtz Zentrum München, Ingolstädter Landstrasse 1, 85764, Neuherberg, Germany. schmitt-kopplin@helmholtz-muenchen.de.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

28607428

Citation

Hemmler, Daniel, et al. "Evolution of Complex Maillard Chemical Reactions, Resolved in Time." Scientific Reports, vol. 7, no. 1, 2017, p. 3227.
Hemmler D, Roullier-Gall C, Marshall JW, et al. Evolution of Complex Maillard Chemical Reactions, Resolved in Time. Sci Rep. 2017;7(1):3227.
Hemmler, D., Roullier-Gall, C., Marshall, J. W., Rychlik, M., Taylor, A. J., & Schmitt-Kopplin, P. (2017). Evolution of Complex Maillard Chemical Reactions, Resolved in Time. Scientific Reports, 7(1), 3227. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-017-03691-z
Hemmler D, et al. Evolution of Complex Maillard Chemical Reactions, Resolved in Time. Sci Rep. 2017 06 12;7(1):3227. PubMed PMID: 28607428.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Evolution of Complex Maillard Chemical Reactions, Resolved in Time. AU - Hemmler,Daniel, AU - Roullier-Gall,Chloé, AU - Marshall,James W, AU - Rychlik,Michael, AU - Taylor,Andrew J, AU - Schmitt-Kopplin,Philippe, Y1 - 2017/06/12/ PY - 2017/04/12/received PY - 2017/05/03/accepted PY - 2017/6/14/entrez PY - 2017/6/14/pubmed PY - 2019/1/11/medline SP - 3227 EP - 3227 JF - Scientific reports JO - Sci Rep VL - 7 IS - 1 N2 - In this study, we monitored the thermal formation of early ribose-glycine Maillard reaction products over time by ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry. Here, we considered sugar decomposition (caramelization) apart from compounds that could only be produced in the presence of the amino acid. More than 300 intermediates as a result of the two initial reactants were found after ten hours (100 °C) to participate in the interplay of the Maillard reaction cascade. Despite the large numerical variety the majority of intermediates follow simple and repetitive reaction patterns. Dehydration, carbonyl cleavage, and redox reactions turned out to have a large impact on the diversity the Maillard reaction causes. Although the Amadori breakdown is considered as the main Maillard reaction pathway, other reactive intermediates, often of higher molecular weight than the Amadori rearrangement product, contribute to a large extent to the multitude of intermediates we observed. SN - 2045-2322 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28607428/Evolution_of_Complex_Maillard_Chemical_Reactions_Resolved_in_Time_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-017-03691-z DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -