Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Continued Bullying Victimization from Childhood to Young Adulthood: a Longitudinal Study of Mediating and Protective Factors.
J Abnorm Child Psychol 2018; 46(1):27-39JA

Abstract

Bullying in schools has severe consequences for victims' adjustment. It is unclear, however, whether victims of school bullying continue to be victimized in other contexts during adulthood. Mediating processes through which peer victimization in school increases the risk of revictimization in adulthood, as well as protective factors, also need to be explored. This study examined 1) the longitudinal association between peer victimization in school and victimization at work during young adulthood, 2) the predictive link of reactive and proactive aggression and anxious-withdrawn behavior in childhood with victimization in school and at the workplace, 3) the potential mediating role of depression symptoms, and 4) the potential protective effect of friendship support. The study included 251 participants (61% females) followed from age 12 to age 22. Participants reported about their victimization in school from ages 12 to 17 and their workplace victimization at age 22. They also reported about their depression-related thoughts and feelings and about friendship support. Teachers rated reactive and proactive aggression and anxiety-withdrawal at age 12. Structural equation modeling revealed that anxiety-withdrawal at age 12 predicted peer victimization in school, which in turn predicted later victimization at work. The latter association was partially mediated by increased depression symptoms. However, friendship support counteracted (via a main effect) the link between school victimization and subsequent depression symptoms. Bullying victims may benefit from interventions aimed at reducing depression symptoms and fostering social skills to establish supportive friendships to help avoid the generation of new interpersonal stress such as workplace victimization in adulthood.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychology, University of Quebec at Montreal, 8888 succursale Centre-ville, Montreal, Quebec, H3C 3P8, Canada. Brendgen.Mara@uqam.ca. Research Unit on Children's Psycholosical Maladjustment, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. Brendgen.Mara@uqam.ca. Ste-Justine Hospital Research Center, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. Brendgen.Mara@uqam.ca.Department of Psychology, University of Quebec at Montreal, 8888 succursale Centre-ville, Montreal, Quebec, H3C 3P8, Canada. Research Unit on Children's Psycholosical Maladjustment, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

28608169

Citation

Brendgen, Mara, and François Poulin. "Continued Bullying Victimization From Childhood to Young Adulthood: a Longitudinal Study of Mediating and Protective Factors." Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology, vol. 46, no. 1, 2018, pp. 27-39.
Brendgen M, Poulin F. Continued Bullying Victimization from Childhood to Young Adulthood: a Longitudinal Study of Mediating and Protective Factors. J Abnorm Child Psychol. 2018;46(1):27-39.
Brendgen, M., & Poulin, F. (2018). Continued Bullying Victimization from Childhood to Young Adulthood: a Longitudinal Study of Mediating and Protective Factors. Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology, 46(1), pp. 27-39. doi:10.1007/s10802-017-0314-5.
Brendgen M, Poulin F. Continued Bullying Victimization From Childhood to Young Adulthood: a Longitudinal Study of Mediating and Protective Factors. J Abnorm Child Psychol. 2018;46(1):27-39. PubMed PMID: 28608169.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Continued Bullying Victimization from Childhood to Young Adulthood: a Longitudinal Study of Mediating and Protective Factors. AU - Brendgen,Mara, AU - Poulin,François, PY - 2017/6/14/pubmed PY - 2019/2/9/medline PY - 2017/6/14/entrez KW - Depression symptoms KW - Friendship support KW - Peer victimization KW - Workplace victimization SP - 27 EP - 39 JF - Journal of abnormal child psychology JO - J Abnorm Child Psychol VL - 46 IS - 1 N2 - Bullying in schools has severe consequences for victims' adjustment. It is unclear, however, whether victims of school bullying continue to be victimized in other contexts during adulthood. Mediating processes through which peer victimization in school increases the risk of revictimization in adulthood, as well as protective factors, also need to be explored. This study examined 1) the longitudinal association between peer victimization in school and victimization at work during young adulthood, 2) the predictive link of reactive and proactive aggression and anxious-withdrawn behavior in childhood with victimization in school and at the workplace, 3) the potential mediating role of depression symptoms, and 4) the potential protective effect of friendship support. The study included 251 participants (61% females) followed from age 12 to age 22. Participants reported about their victimization in school from ages 12 to 17 and their workplace victimization at age 22. They also reported about their depression-related thoughts and feelings and about friendship support. Teachers rated reactive and proactive aggression and anxiety-withdrawal at age 12. Structural equation modeling revealed that anxiety-withdrawal at age 12 predicted peer victimization in school, which in turn predicted later victimization at work. The latter association was partially mediated by increased depression symptoms. However, friendship support counteracted (via a main effect) the link between school victimization and subsequent depression symptoms. Bullying victims may benefit from interventions aimed at reducing depression symptoms and fostering social skills to establish supportive friendships to help avoid the generation of new interpersonal stress such as workplace victimization in adulthood. SN - 1573-2835 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28608169/Continued_Bullying_Victimization_from_Childhood_to_Young_Adulthood:_a_Longitudinal_Study_of_Mediating_and_Protective_Factors_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1007/s10802-017-0314-5 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -