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Metabolic syndrome is independently associated with a mildly reduced estimated glomerular filtration rate: a cross-sectional study.
BMC Nephrol. 2017 Jun 13; 18(1):192.BN

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Association between metabolic syndrome (MS) and mildly reduced estimated glomerular filtration rates (eGFRs) remains unclear. Therefore, we aimed to evaluate the association between MS and a mildly reduced eGFR in Chinese adults.

METHODS

Anthropometric and biochemical examinations were performed in 2992 individuals. The eGFR was calculated from the creatinine level. MS was defined according to the Adult Treatment Panel III criteria as the presence of three or more risk factors. Mildly reduced eGFR was defined as a value between 60 and 90 mL/min/1.73 m2. Multiple linear regression and multiple logistic regression analysis were used to evaluate association between metabolic syndrome and estimate glomerular filtration rate.

RESULTS

After adjusting for several potential confounders, the participants with MS showed a 1.29-fold increased odds ratio for a mildly reduced eGFR compared with those without MS. Additionally, the odds ratios (and 95% confidence intervals (CIs)) for mildly reduced eGFR in participants with elevated triglycerides (TG), decreased high-density lipoprotein (HDL), obesity and elevated fasting blood glucose (FPG) after multivariable adjustment were 1.25 (1.05-1.49), 1.23 (1.03-1.48), 1.22 (1.03-1.45) and 0.64 (0.52-0.78), respectively. The odds ratios (95% CIs) for hyperfiltration in participants with elevated FPG and HbA1c levels after multivariable adjustment were 1.53 (1.30-1.81) and 2.86 (2.00-4.09), respectively.

CONCLUSIONS

MS is associated with an increased risk of a mildly reduced eGFR in the Chinese population, and several individual components of MS have different impacts on eGFR levels. MS had dual roles on renal damage.

TRIAL REGISTRATION

ChiCTR-TRC- 14005029 . Registered 28 July 2014.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Endocrinology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, Jiangsu, 210029, China. Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Huai'an Hospital Affiliated to Xuzhou Medical University and Huai'an Second People's Hospital, Huai'an, 223001, China.Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Huai'an Hospital Affiliated to Xuzhou Medical University and Huai'an Second People's Hospital, Huai'an, 223001, China.Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Hospital Affiliated to Nanjing Medical University and Huai'an First People's Hospital, Huai'an, 223001, China.Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Huai'an Hospital Affiliated to Xuzhou Medical University and Huai'an Second People's Hospital, Huai'an, 223001, China.Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Huai'an Hospital Affiliated to Xuzhou Medical University and Huai'an Second People's Hospital, Huai'an, 223001, China.Department of Endocrinology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, Jiangsu, 210029, China. drhongwenzhou@njmu.edu.cn. Department of Endocrinology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, No. 300 Guangzhou Road, Nanjing, 210029, China. drhongwenzhou@njmu.edu.cn.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

28610620

Citation

Hu, Wen, et al. "Metabolic Syndrome Is Independently Associated With a Mildly Reduced Estimated Glomerular Filtration Rate: a Cross-sectional Study." BMC Nephrology, vol. 18, no. 1, 2017, p. 192.
Hu W, Wu XJ, Ni YJ, et al. Metabolic syndrome is independently associated with a mildly reduced estimated glomerular filtration rate: a cross-sectional study. BMC Nephrol. 2017;18(1):192.
Hu, W., Wu, X. J., Ni, Y. J., Hao, H. R., Yu, W. N., & Zhou, H. W. (2017). Metabolic syndrome is independently associated with a mildly reduced estimated glomerular filtration rate: a cross-sectional study. BMC Nephrology, 18(1), 192. https://doi.org/10.1186/s12882-017-0597-3
Hu W, et al. Metabolic Syndrome Is Independently Associated With a Mildly Reduced Estimated Glomerular Filtration Rate: a Cross-sectional Study. BMC Nephrol. 2017 Jun 13;18(1):192. PubMed PMID: 28610620.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Metabolic syndrome is independently associated with a mildly reduced estimated glomerular filtration rate: a cross-sectional study. AU - Hu,Wen, AU - Wu,Xiao-Juan, AU - Ni,Yao-Jun, AU - Hao,Hai-Rong, AU - Yu,Wei-Nan, AU - Zhou,Hong-Wen, Y1 - 2017/06/13/ PY - 2015/07/27/received PY - 2017/05/19/accepted PY - 2017/6/15/entrez PY - 2017/6/15/pubmed PY - 2018/3/21/medline KW - Chinese KW - Hyperfiltration KW - Metabolic syndrome KW - Mildly reduced eGFR KW - Renal damage SP - 192 EP - 192 JF - BMC nephrology JO - BMC Nephrol VL - 18 IS - 1 N2 - BACKGROUND: Association between metabolic syndrome (MS) and mildly reduced estimated glomerular filtration rates (eGFRs) remains unclear. Therefore, we aimed to evaluate the association between MS and a mildly reduced eGFR in Chinese adults. METHODS: Anthropometric and biochemical examinations were performed in 2992 individuals. The eGFR was calculated from the creatinine level. MS was defined according to the Adult Treatment Panel III criteria as the presence of three or more risk factors. Mildly reduced eGFR was defined as a value between 60 and 90 mL/min/1.73 m2. Multiple linear regression and multiple logistic regression analysis were used to evaluate association between metabolic syndrome and estimate glomerular filtration rate. RESULTS: After adjusting for several potential confounders, the participants with MS showed a 1.29-fold increased odds ratio for a mildly reduced eGFR compared with those without MS. Additionally, the odds ratios (and 95% confidence intervals (CIs)) for mildly reduced eGFR in participants with elevated triglycerides (TG), decreased high-density lipoprotein (HDL), obesity and elevated fasting blood glucose (FPG) after multivariable adjustment were 1.25 (1.05-1.49), 1.23 (1.03-1.48), 1.22 (1.03-1.45) and 0.64 (0.52-0.78), respectively. The odds ratios (95% CIs) for hyperfiltration in participants with elevated FPG and HbA1c levels after multivariable adjustment were 1.53 (1.30-1.81) and 2.86 (2.00-4.09), respectively. CONCLUSIONS: MS is associated with an increased risk of a mildly reduced eGFR in the Chinese population, and several individual components of MS have different impacts on eGFR levels. MS had dual roles on renal damage. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ChiCTR-TRC- 14005029 . Registered 28 July 2014. SN - 1471-2369 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28610620/Metabolic_syndrome_is_independently_associated_with_a_mildly_reduced_estimated_glomerular_filtration_rate:_a_cross_sectional_study_ L2 - https://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2369/18/192 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -