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Effects of branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) on the progression of advanced liver disease: A Korean nationwide, multicenter, retrospective, observational, cohort study.
Medicine (Baltimore). 2017 Jun; 96(24):e6580.M

Abstract

Evidence of the potential benefits of long-term oral branched-chain amino acid (BCAA) supplementation in reducing the severity of liver disease is limited.Patients who were diagnosed with liver cirrhosis with a Child-Pugh (CP) score of 8-10 were included. The BCAA group consumed BCAAs daily for at least 6 months, and the control group consumed a diet without BCAA. We analyzed the improvements based on the model for end-stage liver disease (MELD) score, CP score, incidence of cirrhosis-related complications, and event-free survival over 2 years. Among the 867 recruited patients, 307 (166 in the BCAA group and 141 in the control group) were analyzed. The BCAA group was divided into 3 subgroups, whose patients consumed 4.15 g, 8.3 g, or 12.45 g of BCAAs daily for the analysis. There were significant differences in the CP score, albumin, and hepatic encephalopathy between the 2 groups at baseline. After matching the propensity scores, we analyzed patients in the BCAA-12.45 g group (12.45 g of BCAAs daily, n = 41) and matched control group (n = 41). The MELD score significantly improved in the BCCA-12.45 g group compared to the matched control group (P = .004). The changes in the serum bilirubin level (P = .014) and CP score (P = .033) over time also differed significantly between the 2 groups. The incidence rates of cirrhosis-related complications (P = .973) and development of hepatocellular carcinoma (2 cases each) did not differ significantly between the 2 groups.Long-term oral BCAA supplementation has beneficial effects in patients with advanced liver cirrhosis. A further large-scale prospective study is needed to delineate these beneficial effects.

Authors+Show Affiliations

aDepartment of Internal Medicine, College of Medicine, Yeungnam University bDepartment of Internal Medicine, School of Medicine, Kyungpook National University, Daegu cDepartment of Internal Medicine, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea dDepartment of Internal Medicine, College of Medicine, Soonchunhyang University eDepartment of Internal Medicine, College of Medicine, Yonsei University, Seoul fDepartment of Internal Medicine, Ilsan Paik Hospital, College of Medicine, Inje University College of Medicine, Goyang gDepartment of Internal Medicine, College of Medicine, Hallym University, Chuncheon hDepartment of Internal Medicine, School of Medicine, Chonbuk National University, Chungju iDepartment of Internal Medicine, School of Medicine, Keimyung University, Daegu jDepartment of Internal Medicine, College of Medicine, Dongguk University, Gyeongju kDepartment of Internal Medicine, School of Medicine, Pusan National University, Pusan lMedical Research Collabration Center in KNUH and School of Medicine, Kyungpook National University, Daegu, Korea.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Observational Study

Language

eng

PubMed ID

28614215

Citation

Park, Jung Gil, et al. "Effects of Branched-chain Amino Acids (BCAAs) On the Progression of Advanced Liver Disease: a Korean Nationwide, Multicenter, Retrospective, Observational, Cohort Study." Medicine, vol. 96, no. 24, 2017, pp. e6580.
Park JG, Tak WY, Park SY, et al. Effects of branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) on the progression of advanced liver disease: A Korean nationwide, multicenter, retrospective, observational, cohort study. Medicine (Baltimore). 2017;96(24):e6580.
Park, J. G., Tak, W. Y., Park, S. Y., Kweon, Y. O., Jang, S. Y., Lee, Y. R., Bae, S. H., Jang, J. Y., Kim, D. Y., Lee, J. S., Suk, K. T., Kim, I. H., Lee, H. J., Chung, W. J., Jang, B. K., Suh, J. I., Heo, J., & Lee, W. K. (2017). Effects of branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) on the progression of advanced liver disease: A Korean nationwide, multicenter, retrospective, observational, cohort study. Medicine, 96(24), e6580. https://doi.org/10.1097/MD.0000000000006580
Park JG, et al. Effects of Branched-chain Amino Acids (BCAAs) On the Progression of Advanced Liver Disease: a Korean Nationwide, Multicenter, Retrospective, Observational, Cohort Study. Medicine (Baltimore). 2017;96(24):e6580. PubMed PMID: 28614215.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Effects of branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) on the progression of advanced liver disease: A Korean nationwide, multicenter, retrospective, observational, cohort study. AU - Park,Jung Gil, AU - Tak,Won Young, AU - Park,Soo Young, AU - Kweon,Young Oh, AU - Jang,Se Young, AU - Lee,Yu Rim, AU - Bae,Si Hyun, AU - Jang,Jae Young, AU - Kim,Do Young, AU - Lee,June Sung, AU - Suk,Ki Tae, AU - Kim,In Hee, AU - Lee,Heon Ju, AU - Chung,Woo Jin, AU - Jang,Byoung Kuk, AU - Suh,Jeong Ill, AU - Heo,Jeong, AU - Lee,Won Kee, PY - 2017/6/15/entrez PY - 2017/6/15/pubmed PY - 2017/7/18/medline SP - e6580 EP - e6580 JF - Medicine JO - Medicine (Baltimore) VL - 96 IS - 24 N2 - Evidence of the potential benefits of long-term oral branched-chain amino acid (BCAA) supplementation in reducing the severity of liver disease is limited.Patients who were diagnosed with liver cirrhosis with a Child-Pugh (CP) score of 8-10 were included. The BCAA group consumed BCAAs daily for at least 6 months, and the control group consumed a diet without BCAA. We analyzed the improvements based on the model for end-stage liver disease (MELD) score, CP score, incidence of cirrhosis-related complications, and event-free survival over 2 years. Among the 867 recruited patients, 307 (166 in the BCAA group and 141 in the control group) were analyzed. The BCAA group was divided into 3 subgroups, whose patients consumed 4.15 g, 8.3 g, or 12.45 g of BCAAs daily for the analysis. There were significant differences in the CP score, albumin, and hepatic encephalopathy between the 2 groups at baseline. After matching the propensity scores, we analyzed patients in the BCAA-12.45 g group (12.45 g of BCAAs daily, n = 41) and matched control group (n = 41). The MELD score significantly improved in the BCCA-12.45 g group compared to the matched control group (P = .004). The changes in the serum bilirubin level (P = .014) and CP score (P = .033) over time also differed significantly between the 2 groups. The incidence rates of cirrhosis-related complications (P = .973) and development of hepatocellular carcinoma (2 cases each) did not differ significantly between the 2 groups.Long-term oral BCAA supplementation has beneficial effects in patients with advanced liver cirrhosis. A further large-scale prospective study is needed to delineate these beneficial effects. SN - 1536-5964 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28614215/Effects_of_branched_chain_amino_acids__BCAAs__on_the_progression_of_advanced_liver_disease:_A_Korean_nationwide_multicenter_retrospective_observational_cohort_study_ L2 - http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/MD.0000000000006580 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -