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Pregnancy Outcomes After Maternal Zika Virus Infection During Pregnancy - U.S. Territories, January 1, 2016-April 25, 2017.
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2017 Jun 16; 66(23):615-621.MM

Abstract

Pregnant women living in or traveling to areas with local mosquito-borne Zika virus transmission are at risk for Zika virus infection, which can lead to severe fetal and infant brain abnormalities and microcephaly (1). In February 2016, CDC recommended 1) routine testing for Zika virus infection of asymptomatic pregnant women living in areas with ongoing local Zika virus transmission at the first prenatal care visit, 2) retesting during the second trimester for women who initially test negative, and 3) testing of pregnant women with signs or symptoms consistent with Zika virus disease (e.g., fever, rash, arthralgia, or conjunctivitis) at any time during pregnancy (2). To collect information about pregnant women with laboratory evidence of recent possible Zika virus infection* and outcomes in their fetuses and infants, CDC established pregnancy and infant registries (3). During January 1, 2016-April 25, 2017, U.S. territories† with local transmission of Zika virus reported 2,549 completed pregnancies§ (live births and pregnancy losses at any gestational age) with laboratory evidence of recent possible Zika virus infection; 5% of fetuses or infants resulting from these pregnancies had birth defects potentially associated with Zika virus infection¶ (4,5). Among completed pregnancies with positive nucleic acid tests confirming Zika infection identified in the first, second, and third trimesters, the percentage of fetuses or infants with possible Zika-associated birth defects was 8%, 5%, and 4%, respectively. Among liveborn infants, 59% had Zika laboratory testing results reported to the pregnancy and infant registries. Identification and follow-up of infants born to women with laboratory evidence of recent possible Zika virus infection during pregnancy permits timely and appropriate clinical intervention services (6).

Authors

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Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

28617773

Citation

Shapiro-Mendoza, Carrie K., et al. "Pregnancy Outcomes After Maternal Zika Virus Infection During Pregnancy - U.S. Territories, January 1, 2016-April 25, 2017." MMWR. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, vol. 66, no. 23, 2017, pp. 615-621.
Shapiro-Mendoza CK, Rice ME, Galang RR, et al. Pregnancy Outcomes After Maternal Zika Virus Infection During Pregnancy - U.S. Territories, January 1, 2016-April 25, 2017. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2017;66(23):615-621.
Shapiro-Mendoza, C. K., Rice, M. E., Galang, R. R., Fulton, A. C., VanMaldeghem, K., Prado, M. V., Ellis, E., Anesi, M. S., Simeone, R. M., Petersen, E. E., Ellington, S. R., Jones, A. M., Williams, T., Reagan-Steiner, S., Perez-Padilla, J., Deseda, C. C., Beron, A., Tufa, A. J., Rosinger, A., ... Meaney-Delman, D. (2017). Pregnancy Outcomes After Maternal Zika Virus Infection During Pregnancy - U.S. Territories, January 1, 2016-April 25, 2017. MMWR. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, 66(23), 615-621. https://doi.org/10.15585/mmwr.mm6623e1
Shapiro-Mendoza CK, et al. Pregnancy Outcomes After Maternal Zika Virus Infection During Pregnancy - U.S. Territories, January 1, 2016-April 25, 2017. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2017 Jun 16;66(23):615-621. PubMed PMID: 28617773.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Pregnancy Outcomes After Maternal Zika Virus Infection During Pregnancy - U.S. Territories, January 1, 2016-April 25, 2017. AU - Shapiro-Mendoza,Carrie K, AU - Rice,Marion E, AU - Galang,Romeo R, AU - Fulton,Anna C, AU - VanMaldeghem,Kelley, AU - Prado,Miguel Valencia, AU - Ellis,Esther, AU - Anesi,Magele Scott, AU - Simeone,Regina M, AU - Petersen,Emily E, AU - Ellington,Sascha R, AU - Jones,Abbey M, AU - Williams,Tonya, AU - Reagan-Steiner,Sarah, AU - Perez-Padilla,Janice, AU - Deseda,Carmen C, AU - Beron,Andrew, AU - Tufa,Aifili John, AU - Rosinger,Asher, AU - Roth,Nicole M, AU - Green,Caitlin, AU - Martin,Stacey, AU - Lopez,Camille Delgado, AU - deWilde,Leah, AU - Goodwin,Mary, AU - Pagano,H Pamela, AU - Mai,Cara T, AU - Gould,Carolyn, AU - Zaki,Sherif, AU - Ferrer,Leishla Nieves, AU - Davis,Michelle S, AU - Lathrop,Eva, AU - Polen,Kara, AU - Cragan,Janet D, AU - Reynolds,Megan, AU - Newsome,Kimberly B, AU - Huertas,Mariam Marcano, AU - Bhatangar,Julu, AU - Quiñones,Alma Martinez, AU - Nahabedian,John F, AU - Adams,Laura, AU - Sharp,Tyler M, AU - Hancock,W Thane, AU - Rasmussen,Sonja A, AU - Moore,Cynthia A, AU - Jamieson,Denise J, AU - Munoz-Jordan,Jorge L, AU - Garstang,Helentina, AU - Kambui,Afeke, AU - Masao,Carolee, AU - Honein,Margaret A, AU - Meaney-Delman,Dana, AU - ,, Y1 - 2017/06/16/ PY - 2017/6/16/entrez PY - 2017/6/16/pubmed PY - 2017/6/18/medline SP - 615 EP - 621 JF - MMWR. Morbidity and mortality weekly report JO - MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep VL - 66 IS - 23 N2 - Pregnant women living in or traveling to areas with local mosquito-borne Zika virus transmission are at risk for Zika virus infection, which can lead to severe fetal and infant brain abnormalities and microcephaly (1). In February 2016, CDC recommended 1) routine testing for Zika virus infection of asymptomatic pregnant women living in areas with ongoing local Zika virus transmission at the first prenatal care visit, 2) retesting during the second trimester for women who initially test negative, and 3) testing of pregnant women with signs or symptoms consistent with Zika virus disease (e.g., fever, rash, arthralgia, or conjunctivitis) at any time during pregnancy (2). To collect information about pregnant women with laboratory evidence of recent possible Zika virus infection* and outcomes in their fetuses and infants, CDC established pregnancy and infant registries (3). During January 1, 2016-April 25, 2017, U.S. territories† with local transmission of Zika virus reported 2,549 completed pregnancies§ (live births and pregnancy losses at any gestational age) with laboratory evidence of recent possible Zika virus infection; 5% of fetuses or infants resulting from these pregnancies had birth defects potentially associated with Zika virus infection¶ (4,5). Among completed pregnancies with positive nucleic acid tests confirming Zika infection identified in the first, second, and third trimesters, the percentage of fetuses or infants with possible Zika-associated birth defects was 8%, 5%, and 4%, respectively. Among liveborn infants, 59% had Zika laboratory testing results reported to the pregnancy and infant registries. Identification and follow-up of infants born to women with laboratory evidence of recent possible Zika virus infection during pregnancy permits timely and appropriate clinical intervention services (6). SN - 1545-861X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28617773/Pregnancy_Outcomes_After_Maternal_Zika_Virus_Infection_During_Pregnancy___U_S__Territories_January_1_2016_April_25_2017_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.15585/mmwr.mm6623e1 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -