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Postprandial glycaemic response to berry nectars containing inverted sucrose.
J Nutr Sci 2017; 6:e4JN

Abstract

Sucrose is commonly used for sweetening berry products. During processing and storage of berry products containing added sucrose, sucrose is inverted to glucose and fructose. We have previously shown that postprandial glycaemic response induced by intact sucrose is attenuated when sucrose is consumed with berries rich in polyphenols. It is not known how inversion of sucrose affects glycaemic response. We investigated postprandial glycaemic and insulinaemic responses to blackcurrant (Ribes nigrum) and lingonberry (Vaccinium vitis-idaea) nectars and a reference drink (water) sweetened with glucose and fructose, representing completely inverted sucrose. The nectars and reference drink (300 ml) contained 17·5 g glucose and 17·5 g fructose. Polyphenol composition of the nectars was analysed. A total of eighteen healthy volunteers participated in a randomised, controlled, cross-over study. Blood samples were collected at fasting and six times postprandially during 120 min. Inverted sucrose in the reference drink induced glycaemic and insulinaemic responses similar to those previously observed for intact sucrose. In comparison with the reference, the blackcurrant nectar attenuated the early glycaemic response and improved glycaemic profile, and the lingonberry nectar reduced the insulinaemic response. The responses induced by inverted sucrose in the berry nectars are similar to those previously observed for berry nectars containing intact sucrose, suggesting that inversion has no major impact on glycaemic response to sucrose-sweetened berry products. The attenuated glycaemic response after the blackcurrant nectar may be explained by inhibition of intestinal absorption of glucose by blackcurrant anthocyanins.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Clinical Nutrition, Institute of Public Health and Clinical Nutrition, University of Eastern Finland, PO Box 1627, FI-70211 Kuopio, Finland.New Business Opportunities, Natural Resources Institute Finland, Myllytie 1, FI-31600 Jokioinen, Finland.New Business Opportunities, Natural Resources Institute Finland, Myllytie 1, FI-31600 Jokioinen, Finland.Finnsugar Ltd, Sokeritehtaantie 20, FI-02460 Kantvik, Finland.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

28620479

Citation

Törrönen, Riitta, et al. "Postprandial Glycaemic Response to Berry Nectars Containing Inverted Sucrose." Journal of Nutritional Science, vol. 6, 2017, pp. e4.
Törrönen R, Hellström J, Mattila P, et al. Postprandial glycaemic response to berry nectars containing inverted sucrose. J Nutr Sci. 2017;6:e4.
Törrönen, R., Hellström, J., Mattila, P., & Kilpi, K. (2017). Postprandial glycaemic response to berry nectars containing inverted sucrose. Journal of Nutritional Science, 6, pp. e4. doi:10.1017/jns.2016.44.
Törrönen R, et al. Postprandial Glycaemic Response to Berry Nectars Containing Inverted Sucrose. J Nutr Sci. 2017;6:e4. PubMed PMID: 28620479.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Postprandial glycaemic response to berry nectars containing inverted sucrose. AU - Törrönen,Riitta, AU - Hellström,Jarkko, AU - Mattila,Pirjo, AU - Kilpi,Kyllikki, Y1 - 2017/01/26/ PY - 2016/05/16/received PY - 2016/09/29/revised PY - 2016/11/28/accepted PY - 2017/6/17/entrez PY - 2017/6/18/pubmed PY - 2017/6/18/medline KW - Berries KW - Insulin: Polyphenols KW - Inverted sucrose KW - Postprandial glucose KW - SGLT1, sodium glucose co-transporter 1 KW - i.d., internal diameter SP - e4 EP - e4 JF - Journal of nutritional science JO - J Nutr Sci VL - 6 N2 - Sucrose is commonly used for sweetening berry products. During processing and storage of berry products containing added sucrose, sucrose is inverted to glucose and fructose. We have previously shown that postprandial glycaemic response induced by intact sucrose is attenuated when sucrose is consumed with berries rich in polyphenols. It is not known how inversion of sucrose affects glycaemic response. We investigated postprandial glycaemic and insulinaemic responses to blackcurrant (Ribes nigrum) and lingonberry (Vaccinium vitis-idaea) nectars and a reference drink (water) sweetened with glucose and fructose, representing completely inverted sucrose. The nectars and reference drink (300 ml) contained 17·5 g glucose and 17·5 g fructose. Polyphenol composition of the nectars was analysed. A total of eighteen healthy volunteers participated in a randomised, controlled, cross-over study. Blood samples were collected at fasting and six times postprandially during 120 min. Inverted sucrose in the reference drink induced glycaemic and insulinaemic responses similar to those previously observed for intact sucrose. In comparison with the reference, the blackcurrant nectar attenuated the early glycaemic response and improved glycaemic profile, and the lingonberry nectar reduced the insulinaemic response. The responses induced by inverted sucrose in the berry nectars are similar to those previously observed for berry nectars containing intact sucrose, suggesting that inversion has no major impact on glycaemic response to sucrose-sweetened berry products. The attenuated glycaemic response after the blackcurrant nectar may be explained by inhibition of intestinal absorption of glucose by blackcurrant anthocyanins. SN - 2048-6790 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28620479/Postprandial_glycaemic_response_to_berry_nectars_containing_inverted_sucrose_ L2 - https://www.cambridge.org/core/product/identifier/00044/type/journal_article DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -