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Different effects of γ-linolenic acid (GLA) supplementation on plasma and red blood cell phospholipid fatty acid composition and calcium oxalate kidney stone risk factors in healthy subjects from two race groups with different risk profiles pose questions about the GLA-arachidonic acid-oxaluria metabolic pathway: pilot study.
Urolithiasis. 2018 Apr; 46(2):137-147.U

Abstract

Fatty acid (FA) composition of phospholipids in plasma and red blood cells (RBC) can influence calciuria, oxaluria and renal stone formation. In this regard, the ratio of arachidonic acid (AA) and its precursor linoleic acid (LA) appears to be important. Administration of γ-linolenic acid (GLA) has been shown to increase the concentration of dihomo-gamma linoleic acid (DGLA) relative to AA indicating that it may attenuate biosynthesis of the latter. Such effects have not been investigated in race groups having difference stone occurrence rates. Black (B) and white (W) healthy males ingested capsules containing linoleic acid (LA) and GLA, for 30 days. Plasma and RBC total phospholipid (TPL) FA profiles, serum and 24 h urine biomarkers of hypercalciuria and urinary stone risk factors were determined on days 0 and 30. Data were tested for statistical significance using GraphPadInstat version 3.02. Concentration and percentage content of DGLA in plasma TPL increased in W but not in B. Arachidonic acid (AA) did not change in either group. There was no change in calcium excretion in either group but oxalate and citrate excretion increased in W. We suggest that elongation of GLA to DGLA may occur more rapidly than desaturation of DGLA to AA in W and that depressed activity of the enzyme elongase may occur in B. Calciuric and citraturic effects may be dependent on the quantity of LA or on the mass ratio of LA/GLA in the FA supplement. Questions about the mooted DGLA-AA-oxaluria pathway arise. We speculate that there exists a potential for using GLA as a conservative treatment for hypocitraturia. The observation of different responses in B and W indicates that such differences may play a role in stone formation and prevention.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Chemistry, University of Cape Town, Rondebosch, Cape Town, 7701, South Africa. allen.rodgers@uct.ac.za.Department of Chemistry, University of Cape Town, Rondebosch, Cape Town, 7701, South Africa.Non-Communicable Diseases Research Unit (NCDRU), South African Medical Research Council, Cape Town, South Africa.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

28623397

Citation

Rodgers, Allen L., et al. "Different Effects of Γ-linolenic Acid (GLA) Supplementation On Plasma and Red Blood Cell Phospholipid Fatty Acid Composition and Calcium Oxalate Kidney Stone Risk Factors in Healthy Subjects From Two Race Groups With Different Risk Profiles Pose Questions About the GLA-arachidonic Acid-oxaluria Metabolic Pathway: Pilot Study." Urolithiasis, vol. 46, no. 2, 2018, pp. 137-147.
Rodgers AL, Jappie-Mahomed D, van Jaarsveld PJ. Different effects of γ-linolenic acid (GLA) supplementation on plasma and red blood cell phospholipid fatty acid composition and calcium oxalate kidney stone risk factors in healthy subjects from two race groups with different risk profiles pose questions about the GLA-arachidonic acid-oxaluria metabolic pathway: pilot study. Urolithiasis. 2018;46(2):137-147.
Rodgers, A. L., Jappie-Mahomed, D., & van Jaarsveld, P. J. (2018). Different effects of γ-linolenic acid (GLA) supplementation on plasma and red blood cell phospholipid fatty acid composition and calcium oxalate kidney stone risk factors in healthy subjects from two race groups with different risk profiles pose questions about the GLA-arachidonic acid-oxaluria metabolic pathway: pilot study. Urolithiasis, 46(2), 137-147. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00240-017-0989-7
Rodgers AL, Jappie-Mahomed D, van Jaarsveld PJ. Different Effects of Γ-linolenic Acid (GLA) Supplementation On Plasma and Red Blood Cell Phospholipid Fatty Acid Composition and Calcium Oxalate Kidney Stone Risk Factors in Healthy Subjects From Two Race Groups With Different Risk Profiles Pose Questions About the GLA-arachidonic Acid-oxaluria Metabolic Pathway: Pilot Study. Urolithiasis. 2018;46(2):137-147. PubMed PMID: 28623397.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Different effects of γ-linolenic acid (GLA) supplementation on plasma and red blood cell phospholipid fatty acid composition and calcium oxalate kidney stone risk factors in healthy subjects from two race groups with different risk profiles pose questions about the GLA-arachidonic acid-oxaluria metabolic pathway: pilot study. AU - Rodgers,Allen L, AU - Jappie-Mahomed,Dalielah, AU - van Jaarsveld,Paul J, Y1 - 2017/06/16/ PY - 2017/02/28/received PY - 2017/06/02/accepted PY - 2017/6/18/pubmed PY - 2018/9/11/medline PY - 2017/6/18/entrez KW - Different race groups KW - Kidney stone risk factors KW - Phospholipid fatty acid composition KW - n-6 Fatty acid supplementation SP - 137 EP - 147 JF - Urolithiasis JO - Urolithiasis VL - 46 IS - 2 N2 - Fatty acid (FA) composition of phospholipids in plasma and red blood cells (RBC) can influence calciuria, oxaluria and renal stone formation. In this regard, the ratio of arachidonic acid (AA) and its precursor linoleic acid (LA) appears to be important. Administration of γ-linolenic acid (GLA) has been shown to increase the concentration of dihomo-gamma linoleic acid (DGLA) relative to AA indicating that it may attenuate biosynthesis of the latter. Such effects have not been investigated in race groups having difference stone occurrence rates. Black (B) and white (W) healthy males ingested capsules containing linoleic acid (LA) and GLA, for 30 days. Plasma and RBC total phospholipid (TPL) FA profiles, serum and 24 h urine biomarkers of hypercalciuria and urinary stone risk factors were determined on days 0 and 30. Data were tested for statistical significance using GraphPadInstat version 3.02. Concentration and percentage content of DGLA in plasma TPL increased in W but not in B. Arachidonic acid (AA) did not change in either group. There was no change in calcium excretion in either group but oxalate and citrate excretion increased in W. We suggest that elongation of GLA to DGLA may occur more rapidly than desaturation of DGLA to AA in W and that depressed activity of the enzyme elongase may occur in B. Calciuric and citraturic effects may be dependent on the quantity of LA or on the mass ratio of LA/GLA in the FA supplement. Questions about the mooted DGLA-AA-oxaluria pathway arise. We speculate that there exists a potential for using GLA as a conservative treatment for hypocitraturia. The observation of different responses in B and W indicates that such differences may play a role in stone formation and prevention. SN - 2194-7236 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28623397/Different_effects_of_γ_linolenic_acid__GLA__supplementation_on_plasma_and_red_blood_cell_phospholipid_fatty_acid_composition_and_calcium_oxalate_kidney_stone_risk_factors_in_healthy_subjects_from_two_race_groups_with_different_risk_profiles_pose_questions_about_the_GLA_arachidonic_acid_oxaluria_metabolic_pathway:_pilot_study_ L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00240-017-0989-7 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -