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Effects of intrauterine contraception on the vaginal microbiota.
Contraception. 2017 Sep; 96(3):189-195.C

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

There have been conflicting reports of altered vaginal microbiota and infection susceptibility associated with contraception use. The objectives of this study were to determine if intrauterine contraception altered the vaginal microbiota and to compare the effects of a copper intrauterine device (Cu-IUD) and a levonorgestrel intrauterine system (LNG-IUS) on the vaginal microbiota.

STUDY DESIGN

DNA was isolated from the vaginal swab samples of 76 women using Cu-IUD (n=36) or LNG-IUS (n=40) collected prior to insertion of intrauterine contraception (baseline) and at 6 months. A third swab from approximately 12 months following insertion was available for 69 (Cu-IUD, n=33; LNG-IUS, n=36) of these women. The V4 region of the bacterial 16S rRNA-encoding gene was amplified from the vaginal swab DNA and sequenced. The 16S rRNA gene sequences were processed and analyzed using the software package mothur to compare the structure and dynamics of the vaginal bacterial communities.

RESULTS

The vaginal microbiota from individuals in this study clustered into 3 major vaginal bacterial community types: one dominated by Lactobacillus iners, one dominated by Lactobacillus crispatus and one community type that was not dominated by a single Lactobacillus species. Changes in the vaginal bacterial community composition were not associated with the use of Cu-IUD or LNG-IUS. Additionally, we did not observe a clear difference in vaginal microbiota stability with Cu-IUD versus LNG-IUS use.

CONCLUSIONS

Although the vaginal microbiota can be highly dynamic, alterations in the community associated with the use of intrauterine contraception (Cu-IUD or LNG-IUS) were not detected over 12 months.

IMPLICATIONS

We found no evidence that intrauterine contraception (Cu-IUD or LNG-IUS) altered the vaginal microbiota composition. Therefore, the use of intrauterine contraception is unlikely to shift the composition of the vaginal microbiota such that infection susceptibility is altered.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109. Electronic address: cbassis@umich.edu.Department of Biomedical & Health, University of Missouri - Kansas City School of Medicine, Kansas City, MO 64108; Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology, University of Missouri - Kansas City School of Medicine, Kansas City, MO 64108. Electronic address: allsworthj@umkc.edu.Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109. Electronic address: hwahl@med.umich.edu.Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109. Electronic address: sackd@umich.edu.Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109; Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109. Electronic address: youngvi@med.umich.edu.Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109. Electronic address: jasonbel@med.umich.edu.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

28624570

Citation

Bassis, Christine M., et al. "Effects of Intrauterine Contraception On the Vaginal Microbiota." Contraception, vol. 96, no. 3, 2017, pp. 189-195.
Bassis CM, Allsworth JE, Wahl HN, et al. Effects of intrauterine contraception on the vaginal microbiota. Contraception. 2017;96(3):189-195.
Bassis, C. M., Allsworth, J. E., Wahl, H. N., Sack, D. E., Young, V. B., & Bell, J. D. (2017). Effects of intrauterine contraception on the vaginal microbiota. Contraception, 96(3), 189-195. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.contraception.2017.05.017
Bassis CM, et al. Effects of Intrauterine Contraception On the Vaginal Microbiota. Contraception. 2017;96(3):189-195. PubMed PMID: 28624570.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Effects of intrauterine contraception on the vaginal microbiota. AU - Bassis,Christine M, AU - Allsworth,Jenifer E, AU - Wahl,Heather N, AU - Sack,Daniel E, AU - Young,Vincent B, AU - Bell,Jason D, Y1 - 2017/06/15/ PY - 2016/11/14/received PY - 2017/04/07/revised PY - 2017/05/27/accepted PY - 2017/6/19/pubmed PY - 2018/6/23/medline PY - 2017/6/19/entrez KW - 16S rRNA gene KW - Bacterial community KW - Intrauterine contraception KW - Vaginal microbiota SP - 189 EP - 195 JF - Contraception JO - Contraception VL - 96 IS - 3 N2 - OBJECTIVES: There have been conflicting reports of altered vaginal microbiota and infection susceptibility associated with contraception use. The objectives of this study were to determine if intrauterine contraception altered the vaginal microbiota and to compare the effects of a copper intrauterine device (Cu-IUD) and a levonorgestrel intrauterine system (LNG-IUS) on the vaginal microbiota. STUDY DESIGN: DNA was isolated from the vaginal swab samples of 76 women using Cu-IUD (n=36) or LNG-IUS (n=40) collected prior to insertion of intrauterine contraception (baseline) and at 6 months. A third swab from approximately 12 months following insertion was available for 69 (Cu-IUD, n=33; LNG-IUS, n=36) of these women. The V4 region of the bacterial 16S rRNA-encoding gene was amplified from the vaginal swab DNA and sequenced. The 16S rRNA gene sequences were processed and analyzed using the software package mothur to compare the structure and dynamics of the vaginal bacterial communities. RESULTS: The vaginal microbiota from individuals in this study clustered into 3 major vaginal bacterial community types: one dominated by Lactobacillus iners, one dominated by Lactobacillus crispatus and one community type that was not dominated by a single Lactobacillus species. Changes in the vaginal bacterial community composition were not associated with the use of Cu-IUD or LNG-IUS. Additionally, we did not observe a clear difference in vaginal microbiota stability with Cu-IUD versus LNG-IUS use. CONCLUSIONS: Although the vaginal microbiota can be highly dynamic, alterations in the community associated with the use of intrauterine contraception (Cu-IUD or LNG-IUS) were not detected over 12 months. IMPLICATIONS: We found no evidence that intrauterine contraception (Cu-IUD or LNG-IUS) altered the vaginal microbiota composition. Therefore, the use of intrauterine contraception is unlikely to shift the composition of the vaginal microbiota such that infection susceptibility is altered. SN - 1879-0518 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28624570/Effects_of_intrauterine_contraception_on_the_vaginal_microbiota_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0010-7824(17)30164-6 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -