Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Mercury evidence for pulsed volcanism during the end-Triassic mass extinction.
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2017 07 25; 114(30):7929-7934.PN

Abstract

The Central Atlantic Magmatic Province (CAMP) has long been proposed as having a causal relationship with the end-Triassic extinction event (∼201.5 Ma). In North America and northern Africa, CAMP is preserved as multiple basaltic units interbedded with uppermost Triassic to lowermost Jurassic sediments. However, it has been unclear whether this apparent pulsing was a local feature, or if pulses in the intensity of CAMP volcanism characterized the emplacement of the province as a whole. Here, six geographically widespread Triassic-Jurassic records, representing varied paleoenvironments, are analyzed for mercury (Hg) concentrations and Hg/total organic carbon (Hg/TOC) ratios. Volcanism is a major source of mercury to the modern environment. Clear increases in Hg and Hg/TOC are observed at the end-Triassic extinction horizon, confirming that a volcanically induced global Hg cycle perturbation occurred at that time. The established correlation between the extinction horizon and lowest CAMP basalts allows this sedimentary Hg excursion to be stratigraphically tied to a specific flood basalt unit, strengthening the case for volcanic Hg as the driver of sedimentary Hg/TOC spikes. Additional Hg/TOC peaks are also documented between the extinction horizon and the Triassic-Jurassic boundary (separated by ∼200 ky), supporting pulsatory intensity of CAMP volcanism across the entire province and providing direct evidence for episodic volatile release during the initial stages of CAMP emplacement. Pulsatory volcanism, and associated perturbations in the ocean-atmosphere system, likely had profound implications for the rate and magnitude of the end-Triassic mass extinction and subsequent biotic recovery.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Earth Sciences, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3AN, United Kingdom; lawrence.percival11@gmail.com.Department of Earth Sciences, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3AN, United Kingdom.Camborne School of Mines and Environment and Sustainability Institute, University of Exeter, Penryn TR10 9FE, United Kingdom.Department of Earth Sciences, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3AN, United Kingdom.Department of Earth Sciences, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3AN, United Kingdom.Ocean and Earth Science, National Oceanography Centre Southampton, University of Southampton, Southampton SO14 3ZH, United Kingdom.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

28630294

Citation

Percival, Lawrence M E., et al. "Mercury Evidence for Pulsed Volcanism During the end-Triassic Mass Extinction." Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, vol. 114, no. 30, 2017, pp. 7929-7934.
Percival LME, Ruhl M, Hesselbo SP, et al. Mercury evidence for pulsed volcanism during the end-Triassic mass extinction. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA. 2017;114(30):7929-7934.
Percival, L. M. E., Ruhl, M., Hesselbo, S. P., Jenkyns, H. C., Mather, T. A., & Whiteside, J. H. (2017). Mercury evidence for pulsed volcanism during the end-Triassic mass extinction. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 114(30), 7929-7934. https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1705378114
Percival LME, et al. Mercury Evidence for Pulsed Volcanism During the end-Triassic Mass Extinction. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA. 2017 07 25;114(30):7929-7934. PubMed PMID: 28630294.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Mercury evidence for pulsed volcanism during the end-Triassic mass extinction. AU - Percival,Lawrence M E, AU - Ruhl,Micha, AU - Hesselbo,Stephen P, AU - Jenkyns,Hugh C, AU - Mather,Tamsin A, AU - Whiteside,Jessica H, Y1 - 2017/06/19/ PY - 2017/6/21/pubmed PY - 2018/6/7/medline PY - 2017/6/21/entrez KW - Central Atlantic Magmatic Province KW - end-Triassic extinction KW - mercury SP - 7929 EP - 7934 JF - Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America JO - Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. VL - 114 IS - 30 N2 - The Central Atlantic Magmatic Province (CAMP) has long been proposed as having a causal relationship with the end-Triassic extinction event (∼201.5 Ma). In North America and northern Africa, CAMP is preserved as multiple basaltic units interbedded with uppermost Triassic to lowermost Jurassic sediments. However, it has been unclear whether this apparent pulsing was a local feature, or if pulses in the intensity of CAMP volcanism characterized the emplacement of the province as a whole. Here, six geographically widespread Triassic-Jurassic records, representing varied paleoenvironments, are analyzed for mercury (Hg) concentrations and Hg/total organic carbon (Hg/TOC) ratios. Volcanism is a major source of mercury to the modern environment. Clear increases in Hg and Hg/TOC are observed at the end-Triassic extinction horizon, confirming that a volcanically induced global Hg cycle perturbation occurred at that time. The established correlation between the extinction horizon and lowest CAMP basalts allows this sedimentary Hg excursion to be stratigraphically tied to a specific flood basalt unit, strengthening the case for volcanic Hg as the driver of sedimentary Hg/TOC spikes. Additional Hg/TOC peaks are also documented between the extinction horizon and the Triassic-Jurassic boundary (separated by ∼200 ky), supporting pulsatory intensity of CAMP volcanism across the entire province and providing direct evidence for episodic volatile release during the initial stages of CAMP emplacement. Pulsatory volcanism, and associated perturbations in the ocean-atmosphere system, likely had profound implications for the rate and magnitude of the end-Triassic mass extinction and subsequent biotic recovery. SN - 1091-6490 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28630294/Mercury_evidence_for_pulsed_volcanism_during_the_end_Triassic_mass_extinction_ L2 - http://www.pnas.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=28630294 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -