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Longitudinal study of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome coronavirus infection in dromedary camel herds in Saudi Arabia, 2014-2015.
Emerg Microbes Infect. 2017 Jun 21; 6(6):e56.EM

Abstract

Two herds of dromedary camels were longitudinally sampled with nasal and rectal swabs and serum, between September 2014 and May 2015, and the samples were tested for Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) coronavirus RNA and antibodies. Evidence of MERS-CoV infection was confirmed in one herd on the basis of detection of virus RNA in nasal swabs from three camels and significant increases in the antibody titers from three others. The three viruses were genetically identical, thus indicating introduction of a single virus into this herd. There was evidence of reinfection of camels that were previously seropositive, thus suggesting that prior infection does not provide complete immunity from reinfection, a finding that is relevant to camel vaccination strategies as a means to prevent zoonotic transmission.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Microbiology and Parasitology, College of Veterinary Medicine, King Faisal University, Alhufuf, Al-Ahsa 31982, Saudi Arabia. Department of Virology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Kafrelsheikh University, Kafrelsheikh 33516, Egypt.Department of Clinical Studies, College of Veterinary Medicine, King Faisal University, Alhufuf, Al-Ahsa 31982, Saudi Arabia.School of Public Health, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China.School of Public Health, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China.School of Public Health, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China.Department of Public Health and Animal Welfare, College of Veterinary Medicine, King Faisal University, Alhufuf, Al-Ahsa 31982, Saudi Arabia.School of Public Health, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China.School of Public Health, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China.Division of Virology, Department of Infectious Diseases, St Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, TN 38105, USA.School of Public Health, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China.School of Public Health, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

28634355

Citation

Hemida, Maged Gomaa, et al. "Longitudinal Study of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus Infection in Dromedary Camel Herds in Saudi Arabia, 2014-2015." Emerging Microbes & Infections, vol. 6, no. 6, 2017, pp. e56.
Hemida MG, Alnaeem A, Chu DK, et al. Longitudinal study of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome coronavirus infection in dromedary camel herds in Saudi Arabia, 2014-2015. Emerg Microbes Infect. 2017;6(6):e56.
Hemida, M. G., Alnaeem, A., Chu, D. K., Perera, R. A., Chan, S. M., Almathen, F., Yau, E., Ng, B. C., Webby, R. J., Poon, L. L., & Peiris, M. (2017). Longitudinal study of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome coronavirus infection in dromedary camel herds in Saudi Arabia, 2014-2015. Emerging Microbes & Infections, 6(6), e56. https://doi.org/10.1038/emi.2017.44
Hemida MG, et al. Longitudinal Study of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus Infection in Dromedary Camel Herds in Saudi Arabia, 2014-2015. Emerg Microbes Infect. 2017 Jun 21;6(6):e56. PubMed PMID: 28634355.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Longitudinal study of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome coronavirus infection in dromedary camel herds in Saudi Arabia, 2014-2015. AU - Hemida,Maged Gomaa, AU - Alnaeem,Abdulmohsen, AU - Chu,Daniel Kw, AU - Perera,Ranawaka Apm, AU - Chan,Samuel Ms, AU - Almathen,Faisal, AU - Yau,Emily, AU - Ng,Brian Cy, AU - Webby,Richard J, AU - Poon,Leo Lm, AU - Peiris,Malik, Y1 - 2017/06/21/ PY - 2017/01/23/received PY - 2017/03/09/revised PY - 2017/04/17/accepted PY - 2017/6/22/entrez PY - 2017/6/22/pubmed PY - 2018/1/3/medline SP - e56 EP - e56 JF - Emerging microbes & infections JO - Emerg Microbes Infect VL - 6 IS - 6 N2 - Two herds of dromedary camels were longitudinally sampled with nasal and rectal swabs and serum, between September 2014 and May 2015, and the samples were tested for Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) coronavirus RNA and antibodies. Evidence of MERS-CoV infection was confirmed in one herd on the basis of detection of virus RNA in nasal swabs from three camels and significant increases in the antibody titers from three others. The three viruses were genetically identical, thus indicating introduction of a single virus into this herd. There was evidence of reinfection of camels that were previously seropositive, thus suggesting that prior infection does not provide complete immunity from reinfection, a finding that is relevant to camel vaccination strategies as a means to prevent zoonotic transmission. SN - 2222-1751 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28634355/Longitudinal_study_of_Middle_East_Respiratory_Syndrome_coronavirus_infection_in_dromedary_camel_herds_in_Saudi_Arabia_2014_2015_ L2 - https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1038/emi.2017.44 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -