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Non-suicidal self-injury and suicide attempts in a New Zealand birth cohort.
J Affect Disord 2017; 221:89-96JA

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) and suicide attempts are related, but distinct behaviors. The primary aim of the current study was to identify factors that distinguish those with different lifetime histories of self-injury. A secondary aim was to test whether lifetime history of self-injury at age 26 predicted current suicide ideation at age 32.

METHODS

Participants were 26 year olds from a large birth cohort with a lifetime history of no self-injury (n = 466), a lifetime history of NSSI (n = 191), or a lifetime history of NSSI and a suicide attempt (NSSI+SA; n = 52). They were compared on a history of psychiatric disorders, 12-month suicide ideation, lifetime history of childhood sexual abuse, and lifetime exposure to suicide.

RESULTS

An anxiety disorder, a substance dependence disorder, suicide ideation, and a history of childhood sexual abuse distinguished the NSSI+SA and NSSI only groups. Longitudinal results demonstrated that a history of NSSI predicted future suicide ideation after adjusting for other selected risk factors.

LIMITATIONS

The majority of analyses are cross-sectional which limits inferences about causality. The retrospective self-report for lifetime behavior could be subject to reporting biases.

CONCLUSIONS

Adults with a history of NSSI and adults with a history of NSSI and a suicide attempt are clinically distinct groups that are both at risk of future suicide ideation. Identifying and treating NSSI could be a key preventive factor in reducing subsequent suicide risk.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA, United States. Electronic address: daniel.dl.coppersmith@gmail.com.Department of Preventive and Social Medicine, University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand.School of Health Sciences, University of Canterbury, Christchurch, New Zealand.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

28641148

Citation

Coppersmith, Daniel D L., et al. "Non-suicidal Self-injury and Suicide Attempts in a New Zealand Birth Cohort." Journal of Affective Disorders, vol. 221, 2017, pp. 89-96.
Coppersmith DDL, Nada-Raja S, Beautrais AL. Non-suicidal self-injury and suicide attempts in a New Zealand birth cohort. J Affect Disord. 2017;221:89-96.
Coppersmith, D. D. L., Nada-Raja, S., & Beautrais, A. L. (2017). Non-suicidal self-injury and suicide attempts in a New Zealand birth cohort. Journal of Affective Disorders, 221, pp. 89-96. doi:10.1016/j.jad.2017.06.029.
Coppersmith DDL, Nada-Raja S, Beautrais AL. Non-suicidal Self-injury and Suicide Attempts in a New Zealand Birth Cohort. J Affect Disord. 2017 10 15;221:89-96. PubMed PMID: 28641148.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Non-suicidal self-injury and suicide attempts in a New Zealand birth cohort. AU - Coppersmith,Daniel D L, AU - Nada-Raja,Shyamala, AU - Beautrais,Annette L, Y1 - 2017/06/15/ PY - 2017/03/09/received PY - 2017/05/23/revised PY - 2017/06/14/accepted PY - 2017/6/24/pubmed PY - 2018/3/7/medline PY - 2017/6/23/entrez KW - General population KW - Longitudinal KW - New Zealand KW - Non-suicidal self-injury KW - Suicide attempt KW - Suicide ideation SP - 89 EP - 96 JF - Journal of affective disorders JO - J Affect Disord VL - 221 N2 - BACKGROUND: Non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) and suicide attempts are related, but distinct behaviors. The primary aim of the current study was to identify factors that distinguish those with different lifetime histories of self-injury. A secondary aim was to test whether lifetime history of self-injury at age 26 predicted current suicide ideation at age 32. METHODS: Participants were 26 year olds from a large birth cohort with a lifetime history of no self-injury (n = 466), a lifetime history of NSSI (n = 191), or a lifetime history of NSSI and a suicide attempt (NSSI+SA; n = 52). They were compared on a history of psychiatric disorders, 12-month suicide ideation, lifetime history of childhood sexual abuse, and lifetime exposure to suicide. RESULTS: An anxiety disorder, a substance dependence disorder, suicide ideation, and a history of childhood sexual abuse distinguished the NSSI+SA and NSSI only groups. Longitudinal results demonstrated that a history of NSSI predicted future suicide ideation after adjusting for other selected risk factors. LIMITATIONS: The majority of analyses are cross-sectional which limits inferences about causality. The retrospective self-report for lifetime behavior could be subject to reporting biases. CONCLUSIONS: Adults with a history of NSSI and adults with a history of NSSI and a suicide attempt are clinically distinct groups that are both at risk of future suicide ideation. Identifying and treating NSSI could be a key preventive factor in reducing subsequent suicide risk. SN - 1573-2517 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28641148/Non_suicidal_self_injury_and_suicide_attempts_in_a_New_Zealand_birth_cohort_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0165-0327(17)30494-9 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -