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The fruit and vegetable intake of young Australian adults: a population perspective.
Public Health Nutr 2017; 20(14):2499-2512PH

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To examine intakes and variety of fruit and vegetables consumed by Australian young adults, also assessing differences by meal occasion and sociodemographic characteristics.

DESIGN

Secondary analysis of cross-sectional 24 h recall data collected through the 2011-12 National Nutrition and Physical Activity Survey. Crude means and proportions consuming fruits and vegetables were calculated. Pearson χ 2 tests, Kruskal-Wallis analyses and linear regression models were used to assess differences in mean intakes by age, BMI and sociodemographic variables. The variety eaten was determined based on the number of fruit and vegetable subgroups consumed.

SETTING

Representative sample of metropolitan and rural areas across Australia.

SUBJECTS

Respondents aged 18-34 years were included (n 2397).

RESULTS

Mean daily intake of fruit (128 g/0·9 servings) and vegetables (205 g/2·7 servings) was lower than the minimum recommended intake set at 2 and 5 servings, respectively. Age was positively associated with fruit and vegetable intake (P=0·002, P<0·001), with 18-24-year-olds reporting the poorest vegetable variety compared with 25-29- and 30-34-year-olds (P=0·002). When controlling for total energy, males consumed less vegetables than females (P=0·002). A large proportion of the 15 % of respondents who consumed adequate amounts of fruits and vegetables on the day prior to the survey reported intake across all meal occasions (P<0·001).

CONCLUSIONS

Fruit and vegetable intake is suboptimal among Australian young adults. An age-appropriate campaign is recommended to target increased consumption, particularly for those aged 18-24 years, with opportunity to promote increased variety and consumption across the day.

Authors+Show Affiliations

1The University of Sydney,School of Life and Environmental Sciences,Level 4 EAST,Charles Perkins Centre D17,John Hopkins Drive,Sydney,NSW 2006,Australia.1The University of Sydney,School of Life and Environmental Sciences,Level 4 EAST,Charles Perkins Centre D17,John Hopkins Drive,Sydney,NSW 2006,Australia.1The University of Sydney,School of Life and Environmental Sciences,Level 4 EAST,Charles Perkins Centre D17,John Hopkins Drive,Sydney,NSW 2006,Australia.1The University of Sydney,School of Life and Environmental Sciences,Level 4 EAST,Charles Perkins Centre D17,John Hopkins Drive,Sydney,NSW 2006,Australia.2The University of Sydney,School of Public Health,Sydney,NSW,Australia.1The University of Sydney,School of Life and Environmental Sciences,Level 4 EAST,Charles Perkins Centre D17,John Hopkins Drive,Sydney,NSW 2006,Australia.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

28653594

Citation

Nour, Monica, et al. "The Fruit and Vegetable Intake of Young Australian Adults: a Population Perspective." Public Health Nutrition, vol. 20, no. 14, 2017, pp. 2499-2512.
Nour M, Sui Z, Grech A, et al. The fruit and vegetable intake of young Australian adults: a population perspective. Public Health Nutr. 2017;20(14):2499-2512.
Nour, M., Sui, Z., Grech, A., Rangan, A., McGeechan, K., & Allman-Farinelli, M. (2017). The fruit and vegetable intake of young Australian adults: a population perspective. Public Health Nutrition, 20(14), pp. 2499-2512. doi:10.1017/S1368980017001124.
Nour M, et al. The Fruit and Vegetable Intake of Young Australian Adults: a Population Perspective. Public Health Nutr. 2017;20(14):2499-2512. PubMed PMID: 28653594.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The fruit and vegetable intake of young Australian adults: a population perspective. AU - Nour,Monica, AU - Sui,Zhixian, AU - Grech,Amanda, AU - Rangan,Anna, AU - McGeechan,Kevin, AU - Allman-Farinelli,Margaret, Y1 - 2017/06/27/ PY - 2017/6/28/pubmed PY - 2018/6/14/medline PY - 2017/6/28/entrez KW - Fruits KW - Population studies KW - Vegetables KW - Young adults SP - 2499 EP - 2512 JF - Public health nutrition JO - Public Health Nutr VL - 20 IS - 14 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To examine intakes and variety of fruit and vegetables consumed by Australian young adults, also assessing differences by meal occasion and sociodemographic characteristics. DESIGN: Secondary analysis of cross-sectional 24 h recall data collected through the 2011-12 National Nutrition and Physical Activity Survey. Crude means and proportions consuming fruits and vegetables were calculated. Pearson χ 2 tests, Kruskal-Wallis analyses and linear regression models were used to assess differences in mean intakes by age, BMI and sociodemographic variables. The variety eaten was determined based on the number of fruit and vegetable subgroups consumed. SETTING: Representative sample of metropolitan and rural areas across Australia. SUBJECTS: Respondents aged 18-34 years were included (n 2397). RESULTS: Mean daily intake of fruit (128 g/0·9 servings) and vegetables (205 g/2·7 servings) was lower than the minimum recommended intake set at 2 and 5 servings, respectively. Age was positively associated with fruit and vegetable intake (P=0·002, P<0·001), with 18-24-year-olds reporting the poorest vegetable variety compared with 25-29- and 30-34-year-olds (P=0·002). When controlling for total energy, males consumed less vegetables than females (P=0·002). A large proportion of the 15 % of respondents who consumed adequate amounts of fruits and vegetables on the day prior to the survey reported intake across all meal occasions (P<0·001). CONCLUSIONS: Fruit and vegetable intake is suboptimal among Australian young adults. An age-appropriate campaign is recommended to target increased consumption, particularly for those aged 18-24 years, with opportunity to promote increased variety and consumption across the day. SN - 1475-2727 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28653594/The_fruit_and_vegetable_intake_of_young_Australian_adults:_a_population_perspective_ L2 - https://www.cambridge.org/core/product/identifier/S1368980017001124/type/journal_article DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -