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Associations of Prenatal Urinary Bisphenol A Concentrations with Child Behaviors and Cognitive Abilities.
Environ Health Perspect. 2017 06 16; 125(6):067008.EH

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Prenatal bisphenol A (BPA) exposure has been associated with adverse neurodevelopment in epidemiological studies. However, prior studies had limited statistical power to examine sex-specific effects, and few examined child cognition.

OBJECTIVES

We estimated the association between prenatal BPA exposure and child neurobehavior at 3 y of age in a prospective cohort of 812 mothers and their children.

METHODS

We measured BPA concentration in urine samples collected at ∼12 wk gestation among women enrolled in a 10-city Canadian cohort study. At approximately 3 y of age, we assessed children’s cognitive abilities with the Wechsler Primary and Preschool Scale of IntelligenceTM–III (WPPSI-III) and two scales of the Behavior Rating Inventory of Executive Function–Preschool (BRIEF-P). Parents reported children’s behavior using the Behavior Assessment System for Children–2 (BASC-2) and the Social Responsiveness ScaleTM–2 (SRS-2). We estimated covariate-adjusted differences in neurobehavioral outcomes with a doubling in BPA concentration and sex-specific associations.

RESULTS

BPA was not associated with WPPSI-III scores; child sex did not modify these associations. The association between BPA and BRIEF-P scores was modified by child sex (BPA×sex p-values≤0.03). For example, a doubling of BPA concentration was associated with 1-point (95% CI: 0.3, 1.7) poorer working memory in boys and 0.5-point (95% CI: −1.1, 0.1) better scores in girls. BPA was not associated with most BASC-2 scales; however, it was associated with more internalizing and somatizing behaviors in boys, but not in girls (BPA×sex p&-values≤0.08). A doubling of BPA concentration was associated with poorer SRS-2 scores [β=0.3 (95% CI: 0, 0.7)]; this association was not modified by sex.

CONCLUSION

Prenatal urinary BPA concentration was associated with some aspects of child behavior in this cohort, and some associations were stronger among boys. https://doi.org/10.1289/EHP984.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Epidemiology, Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island, USA.School of Psychology, Laval University, Ville de Québec, Québec, Canada.Population Studies Division, Healthy Environments and Consumer Safety Branch, Health Canada, Ottawa, Ontario, CanadaDepartment of Environmental and Occupational Health, University of Montréal, Montréal, Québec, Canada Centre hospitalier universitaire (CHU) Sainte-Justine Research Center, Mother and Child University Hospital Center, Montreal, Québec, CanadaCentre hospitalier universitaire (CHU) Sainte-Justine Research Center, Mother and Child University Hospital Center, Montreal, Québec, Canada Centre de recherche du CHUS (CHU de Sherbrooke), University of Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, Québec, CanadaCHU de Québec-Université Laval Research Center, Ville de Québec, Québec, CanadaCentre hospitalier universitaire (CHU) Sainte-Justine Research Center, Mother and Child University Hospital Center, Montreal, Québec, Canada Department of Psychiatry, University of Montréal, Montréal, Québec, CanadaSchool of Psychology, Laval University, Ville de Québec, Québec, Canada. Department of Environmental Health, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USAFaculty of Health Sciences, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, British Columbia, Canada BC Children’s Hospital Research Institute, Vancouver, British Columbia, CanadaFaculty of Health Sciences, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, British Columbia, Canada BC Children’s Hospital Research Institute, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

28657891

Citation

Braun, Joseph M., et al. "Associations of Prenatal Urinary Bisphenol a Concentrations With Child Behaviors and Cognitive Abilities." Environmental Health Perspectives, vol. 125, no. 6, 2017, p. 067008.
Braun JM, Muckle G, Arbuckle T, et al. Associations of Prenatal Urinary Bisphenol A Concentrations with Child Behaviors and Cognitive Abilities. Environ Health Perspect. 2017;125(6):067008.
Braun, J. M., Muckle, G., Arbuckle, T., Bouchard, M. F., Fraser, W. D., Ouellet, E., Séguin, J. R., Oulhote, Y., Webster, G. M., & Lanphear, B. P. (2017). Associations of Prenatal Urinary Bisphenol A Concentrations with Child Behaviors and Cognitive Abilities. Environmental Health Perspectives, 125(6), 067008. https://doi.org/10.1289/EHP984
Braun JM, et al. Associations of Prenatal Urinary Bisphenol a Concentrations With Child Behaviors and Cognitive Abilities. Environ Health Perspect. 2017 06 16;125(6):067008. PubMed PMID: 28657891.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Associations of Prenatal Urinary Bisphenol A Concentrations with Child Behaviors and Cognitive Abilities. AU - Braun,Joseph M, AU - Muckle,Gina, AU - Arbuckle,Tye, AU - Bouchard,Maryse F, AU - Fraser,William D, AU - Ouellet,Emmanuel, AU - Séguin,Jean R, AU - Oulhote,Youssef, AU - Webster,Glenys M, AU - Lanphear,Bruce P, Y1 - 2017/06/16/ PY - 2016/08/18/received PY - 2016/12/09/revised PY - 2016/12/12/accepted PY - 2017/6/29/entrez PY - 2017/6/29/pubmed PY - 2017/10/20/medline SP - 067008 EP - 067008 JF - Environmental health perspectives JO - Environ. Health Perspect. VL - 125 IS - 6 N2 - BACKGROUND: Prenatal bisphenol A (BPA) exposure has been associated with adverse neurodevelopment in epidemiological studies. However, prior studies had limited statistical power to examine sex-specific effects, and few examined child cognition. OBJECTIVES: We estimated the association between prenatal BPA exposure and child neurobehavior at 3 y of age in a prospective cohort of 812 mothers and their children. METHODS: We measured BPA concentration in urine samples collected at ∼12 wk gestation among women enrolled in a 10-city Canadian cohort study. At approximately 3 y of age, we assessed children’s cognitive abilities with the Wechsler Primary and Preschool Scale of IntelligenceTM–III (WPPSI-III) and two scales of the Behavior Rating Inventory of Executive Function–Preschool (BRIEF-P). Parents reported children’s behavior using the Behavior Assessment System for Children–2 (BASC-2) and the Social Responsiveness ScaleTM–2 (SRS-2). We estimated covariate-adjusted differences in neurobehavioral outcomes with a doubling in BPA concentration and sex-specific associations. RESULTS: BPA was not associated with WPPSI-III scores; child sex did not modify these associations. The association between BPA and BRIEF-P scores was modified by child sex (BPA×sex p-values≤0.03). For example, a doubling of BPA concentration was associated with 1-point (95% CI: 0.3, 1.7) poorer working memory in boys and 0.5-point (95% CI: −1.1, 0.1) better scores in girls. BPA was not associated with most BASC-2 scales; however, it was associated with more internalizing and somatizing behaviors in boys, but not in girls (BPA×sex p&-values≤0.08). A doubling of BPA concentration was associated with poorer SRS-2 scores [β=0.3 (95% CI: 0, 0.7)]; this association was not modified by sex. CONCLUSION: Prenatal urinary BPA concentration was associated with some aspects of child behavior in this cohort, and some associations were stronger among boys. https://doi.org/10.1289/EHP984. SN - 1552-9924 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28657891/Associations_of_Prenatal_Urinary_Bisphenol_A_Concentrations_with_Child_Behaviors_and_Cognitive_Abilities_ L2 - https://ehp.niehs.nih.gov/doi/full/10.1289/EHP984?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -