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Products of chickpea processing as texture improvers in gluten-free bread.
Food Sci Technol Int. 2017 Dec; 23(8):690-698.FS

Abstract

Recent market developments raised the need for alternatives to hydrocolloids as texture improver in gluten-free bread. Chickpea exerts several physicochemical properties (water- and oil-binding, emulsifying and foaming) that might address this need. Therefore, the effect of processing on chickpea functionality was tested on low ingredient dose, comparably to that of common hydrocolloids. Control bread was small, hard and with low gas retention ability as shown by microscopy, depicting holes inside crumb pores. Addition of chickpea flour in low dose (2% w/w) enhanced loaf volume by 20% and reduced crumb hardness by 40%, due to increased gas retention (no holes within pores) and superior homogeneity of the starch-protein network. On the contrary, chickpea paste deleteriously affected bread quality due to loss of solubility upon cooking. Interestingly, both soaking and cooking water significantly reduced crumb hardness, although to a lower extent than the flour. More homogeneous crumb structure and gas retention were observed in the micrographs, possibly due to the emulsifying activity of flavonoids and saponins (soaking) and insoluble fibre (cooking). Chickpea ingredients are promising substitute of hydrocolloids such as xanthan gum for texture improvement of gluten-free bread, although acting with different mechanisms.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Wine, Food and Molecular Biosciences, Faculty of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Lincoln University, Christchurch, New Zealand.Department of Wine, Food and Molecular Biosciences, Faculty of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Lincoln University, Christchurch, New Zealand.Department of Wine, Food and Molecular Biosciences, Faculty of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Lincoln University, Christchurch, New Zealand.Department of Wine, Food and Molecular Biosciences, Faculty of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Lincoln University, Christchurch, New Zealand.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

28658964

Citation

Bird, Libby G., et al. "Products of Chickpea Processing as Texture Improvers in Gluten-free Bread." Food Science and Technology International = Ciencia Y Tecnologia De Los Alimentos Internacional, vol. 23, no. 8, 2017, pp. 690-698.
Bird LG, Pilkington CL, Saputra A, et al. Products of chickpea processing as texture improvers in gluten-free bread. Food Sci Technol Int. 2017;23(8):690-698.
Bird, L. G., Pilkington, C. L., Saputra, A., & Serventi, L. (2017). Products of chickpea processing as texture improvers in gluten-free bread. Food Science and Technology International = Ciencia Y Tecnologia De Los Alimentos Internacional, 23(8), 690-698. https://doi.org/10.1177/1082013217717802
Bird LG, et al. Products of Chickpea Processing as Texture Improvers in Gluten-free Bread. Food Sci Technol Int. 2017;23(8):690-698. PubMed PMID: 28658964.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Products of chickpea processing as texture improvers in gluten-free bread. AU - Bird,Libby G, AU - Pilkington,Casey L, AU - Saputra,Agung, AU - Serventi,Luca, Y1 - 2017/06/28/ PY - 2017/7/1/pubmed PY - 2018/7/19/medline PY - 2017/6/30/entrez KW - Bakery products KW - digital image KW - food ingredients KW - food texture KW - legumes SP - 690 EP - 698 JF - Food science and technology international = Ciencia y tecnologia de los alimentos internacional JO - Food Sci Technol Int VL - 23 IS - 8 N2 - Recent market developments raised the need for alternatives to hydrocolloids as texture improver in gluten-free bread. Chickpea exerts several physicochemical properties (water- and oil-binding, emulsifying and foaming) that might address this need. Therefore, the effect of processing on chickpea functionality was tested on low ingredient dose, comparably to that of common hydrocolloids. Control bread was small, hard and with low gas retention ability as shown by microscopy, depicting holes inside crumb pores. Addition of chickpea flour in low dose (2% w/w) enhanced loaf volume by 20% and reduced crumb hardness by 40%, due to increased gas retention (no holes within pores) and superior homogeneity of the starch-protein network. On the contrary, chickpea paste deleteriously affected bread quality due to loss of solubility upon cooking. Interestingly, both soaking and cooking water significantly reduced crumb hardness, although to a lower extent than the flour. More homogeneous crumb structure and gas retention were observed in the micrographs, possibly due to the emulsifying activity of flavonoids and saponins (soaking) and insoluble fibre (cooking). Chickpea ingredients are promising substitute of hydrocolloids such as xanthan gum for texture improvement of gluten-free bread, although acting with different mechanisms. SN - 1532-1738 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28658964/Products_of_chickpea_processing_as_texture_improvers_in_gluten_free_bread_ L2 - https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/1082013217717802?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -