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An update of the WCRF/AICR systematic literature review and meta-analysis on dietary and anthropometric factors and esophageal cancer risk.
Ann Oncol 2017; 28(10):2409-2419AO

Abstract

Background

In the 2007 World Cancer Research Fund/American Institute for Cancer Research Second Expert Report, the expert panel judged that there was strong evidence that alcoholic drinks and body fatness increased esophageal cancer risk, whereas fruits and vegetables probably decreased its risk. The judgments were mainly based on case-control studies. As part of the Continuous Update Project, we updated the scientific evidence accumulated from cohort studies in this topic.

Methods

We updated the Continuous Update Project database up to 10 January 2017 by searching in PubMed and conducted dose-response meta-analyses to estimate summary relative risks (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) using random effects model.

Results

A total of 57 cohort studies were included in 13 meta-analyses. Esophageal adenocarcinoma risk was inversely related to vegetable intake (RR per 100 g/day: 0.89, 95% CI: 0.80-0.99, n = 3) and directly associated with body mass index (RR per 5 kg/m2: 1.47, 95% CI: 1.34-1.61, n = 9). For esophageal squamous cell carcinoma, inverse associations were observed with fruit intake (RR for 100 g/day increment: 0.84, 95% CI: 0.75-0.94, n = 3) and body mass index (RR for 5 kg/m2 increment: 0.64, 95% CI: 0.56-0.73, n = 8), and direct associations with intakes of processed meats (RR for 50 g/day increment: 1.59, 95% CI: 1.11-2.28, n = 3), processed and red meats (RR for 100 g/day increment: 1.37, 95% CI: 1.04-1.82, n = 3) and alcohol (RR for 10 g/day increment: 1.25, 95% CI: 1.12-1.41, n = 6).

Conclusions

Evidence from cohort studies suggested a protective role of vegetables and body weight control in esophageal adenocarcinomas development. For squamous cell carcinomas, higher intakes of red and processed meats and alcohol may increase the risk, whereas fruits intake may play a protective role.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, UK. Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, UK.Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, UK.Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, UK.Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, UK.Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, UK.Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, UK.Division of Biostatistics, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK.Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, UK.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Meta-Analysis
Review
Systematic Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

28666313

Citation

Vingeliene, S, et al. "An Update of the WCRF/AICR Systematic Literature Review and Meta-analysis On Dietary and Anthropometric Factors and Esophageal Cancer Risk." Annals of Oncology : Official Journal of the European Society for Medical Oncology, vol. 28, no. 10, 2017, pp. 2409-2419.
Vingeliene S, Chan DSM, Vieira AR, et al. An update of the WCRF/AICR systematic literature review and meta-analysis on dietary and anthropometric factors and esophageal cancer risk. Ann Oncol. 2017;28(10):2409-2419.
Vingeliene, S., Chan, D. S. M., Vieira, A. R., Polemiti, E., Stevens, C., Abar, L., ... Norat, T. (2017). An update of the WCRF/AICR systematic literature review and meta-analysis on dietary and anthropometric factors and esophageal cancer risk. Annals of Oncology : Official Journal of the European Society for Medical Oncology, 28(10), pp. 2409-2419. doi:10.1093/annonc/mdx338.
Vingeliene S, et al. An Update of the WCRF/AICR Systematic Literature Review and Meta-analysis On Dietary and Anthropometric Factors and Esophageal Cancer Risk. Ann Oncol. 2017 Oct 1;28(10):2409-2419. PubMed PMID: 28666313.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - An update of the WCRF/AICR systematic literature review and meta-analysis on dietary and anthropometric factors and esophageal cancer risk. AU - Vingeliene,S, AU - Chan,D S M, AU - Vieira,A R, AU - Polemiti,E, AU - Stevens,C, AU - Abar,L, AU - Navarro Rosenblatt,D, AU - Greenwood,D C, AU - Norat,T, PY - 2017/7/2/pubmed PY - 2018/5/31/medline PY - 2017/7/2/entrez KW - anthropometry KW - diet KW - dose–response KW - esophageal cancer KW - meta-analysis SP - 2409 EP - 2419 JF - Annals of oncology : official journal of the European Society for Medical Oncology JO - Ann. Oncol. VL - 28 IS - 10 N2 - Background: In the 2007 World Cancer Research Fund/American Institute for Cancer Research Second Expert Report, the expert panel judged that there was strong evidence that alcoholic drinks and body fatness increased esophageal cancer risk, whereas fruits and vegetables probably decreased its risk. The judgments were mainly based on case-control studies. As part of the Continuous Update Project, we updated the scientific evidence accumulated from cohort studies in this topic. Methods: We updated the Continuous Update Project database up to 10 January 2017 by searching in PubMed and conducted dose-response meta-analyses to estimate summary relative risks (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) using random effects model. Results: A total of 57 cohort studies were included in 13 meta-analyses. Esophageal adenocarcinoma risk was inversely related to vegetable intake (RR per 100 g/day: 0.89, 95% CI: 0.80-0.99, n = 3) and directly associated with body mass index (RR per 5 kg/m2: 1.47, 95% CI: 1.34-1.61, n = 9). For esophageal squamous cell carcinoma, inverse associations were observed with fruit intake (RR for 100 g/day increment: 0.84, 95% CI: 0.75-0.94, n = 3) and body mass index (RR for 5 kg/m2 increment: 0.64, 95% CI: 0.56-0.73, n = 8), and direct associations with intakes of processed meats (RR for 50 g/day increment: 1.59, 95% CI: 1.11-2.28, n = 3), processed and red meats (RR for 100 g/day increment: 1.37, 95% CI: 1.04-1.82, n = 3) and alcohol (RR for 10 g/day increment: 1.25, 95% CI: 1.12-1.41, n = 6). Conclusions: Evidence from cohort studies suggested a protective role of vegetables and body weight control in esophageal adenocarcinomas development. For squamous cell carcinomas, higher intakes of red and processed meats and alcohol may increase the risk, whereas fruits intake may play a protective role. SN - 1569-8041 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28666313/An_update_of_the_WCRF/AICR_systematic_literature_review_and_meta_analysis_on_dietary_and_anthropometric_factors_and_esophageal_cancer_risk_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/annonc/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/annonc/mdx338 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -