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Meat allergy associated with galactosyl-α-(1,3)-galactose (α-Gal)-Closing diagnostic gaps by anti-α-Gal IgE immune profiling.
Allergy. 2018 Jan; 73(1):93-105.A

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Glycoproteins and glycolipids of some mammalian species contain the disaccharide galactosyl-α-(1,3)-galactose (α-Gal). It is known that α-Gal is immunogenic in humans and causes glycan-specific IgG and also IgE responses with clinical relevance. α-Gal is part of the IgE-reactive monoclonal therapeutic antibody cetuximab (CTX) and is associated with delayed anaphylaxis to red meat. In this study, different α-Gal-containing analytes are examined in singleplex and multiplex assays to resolve individual sensitization patterns with IgE against α-Gal.

METHODS

Three serum groups, α-Gal-associated meat allergy (MA) patients, idiopathic anaphylaxis (IA) patients with suspected MA, and non-meat-allergic healthy control individuals (HC), were analyzed via singleplex allergy diagnostics and a newly established immunoblot diagnostic system. The new dot blot detection system resolved individual IgE sensitization profiles for α-Gal-containing analytes CTX, bovine thyroglobulin (Bos d TG), and human serum albumin (HSA)-conjugated α-Gal.

RESULTS

Singleplex allergy diagnostics using the α-Gal analytes CTX and Bos d TG confirms the history of MA patients in 91% and 88% of the cases, respectively. A novel dot blot-based assay system for the detection of IgE against α-Gal reveals individual IgE sensitization profiles for α-Gal-containing analytes. An α-Gal-associated IgE cross-reactivity profile (IgE against CTX, Bos d TG, and HSA-α-Gal) was identified, which is associated with MA.

CONCLUSIONS

Detection of individual sensitization patterns with different α-Gal-containing analytes provides the basis for an individual allergy diagnosis for α-Gal-sensitized patients. Higher amounts of α-Gal in pork and beef innards compared to muscle meat as indicated by a higher staining intensity are a plausible explanation for the difference in allergic symptom severity.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Clinical and Molecular Allergology, Priority Research Area Asthma & Allergy, Research Center Borstel, Airway Research Center North (ARCN), Member of the German Center for Lung Research (DZL), Borstel, Germany. Interdisciplinary Allergy Division, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Lübeck, Lübeck, Germany.Division of Clinical and Molecular Allergology, Priority Research Area Asthma & Allergy, Research Center Borstel, Airway Research Center North (ARCN), Member of the German Center for Lung Research (DZL), Borstel, Germany.Department of Dermatology and Venereology, Martin-Luther-University Halle-Wittenberg, Halle (Saale), Germany.Department of Dermatology and Allergology, Klinikum Augsburg, Augsburg, Germany.Department of Dermatology, Ludwig-Maximilians University, Munich, Germany.Department of Dermatology, Ludwig-Maximilians University, Munich, Germany.Department of Dermatology, Ludwig-Maximilians University, Munich, Germany.Department of Dermatology, University of Tübingen, Tübingen, Germany.Department of Dermatology, University of Tübingen, Tübingen, Germany. Department of Dermatology and Allergology, Technical University of Munich, Munich, Germany.Department of Dermatology, University of Lübeck, Lübeck, Germany.IPM Biotech, Hamburg, Germany.Department of Dermatology, Ludwig-Maximilians University, Munich, Germany.Department of Dermatology, RWTH Aachen University, Aachen, Germany.Department of Dermatology, Klinikum, Darmstadt, Germany.Department of Dermatology, Venereology and Allergology, University of Leipzig, Leipzig, Germany.Department of Dermatology and Allergy, Allergy Center Charité, Berlin, Germany.Dermatology & Allergology, St. Bernward Klinik, Hildesheim, Germany.Department of Dermatology, University of Mainz, Mainz, Germany.Division of Clinical and Molecular Allergology, Priority Research Area Asthma & Allergy, Research Center Borstel, Airway Research Center North (ARCN), Member of the German Center for Lung Research (DZL), Borstel, Germany.Pathology of the University Medical Center Schleswig-Holstein (UKSH), Campus Lübeck and Research Center Borstel, Airway Research Center North (ARCN), Member of the German Center for Lung Research (DZL), Borstel, Germany.University of Virginia Asthma and Allergic Diseases Center, Charlottesville, USA.Division of Clinical and Molecular Allergology, Priority Research Area Asthma & Allergy, Research Center Borstel, Airway Research Center North (ARCN), Member of the German Center for Lung Research (DZL), Borstel, Germany.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

28670695

Citation

Jappe, U, et al. "Meat Allergy Associated With Galactosyl-α-(1,3)-galactose (α-Gal)-Closing Diagnostic Gaps By anti-α-Gal IgE Immune Profiling." Allergy, vol. 73, no. 1, 2018, pp. 93-105.
Jappe U, Minge S, Kreft B, et al. Meat allergy associated with galactosyl-α-(1,3)-galactose (α-Gal)-Closing diagnostic gaps by anti-α-Gal IgE immune profiling. Allergy. 2018;73(1):93-105.
Jappe, U., Minge, S., Kreft, B., Ludwig, A., Przybilla, B., Walker, A., Varga, R., Seidel, P., Biedermann, T., Anemüller, W., Kromminga, A., Ruëff, F., Merk, H., Wagner, N., Treudler, R., Worm, M., Waldmann, I., Saloga, J., Becker, W. M., ... Homann, A. (2018). Meat allergy associated with galactosyl-α-(1,3)-galactose (α-Gal)-Closing diagnostic gaps by anti-α-Gal IgE immune profiling. Allergy, 73(1), 93-105. https://doi.org/10.1111/all.13238
Jappe U, et al. Meat Allergy Associated With Galactosyl-α-(1,3)-galactose (α-Gal)-Closing Diagnostic Gaps By anti-α-Gal IgE Immune Profiling. Allergy. 2018;73(1):93-105. PubMed PMID: 28670695.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Meat allergy associated with galactosyl-α-(1,3)-galactose (α-Gal)-Closing diagnostic gaps by anti-α-Gal IgE immune profiling. AU - Jappe,U, AU - Minge,S, AU - Kreft,B, AU - Ludwig,A, AU - Przybilla,B, AU - Walker,A, AU - Varga,R, AU - Seidel,P, AU - Biedermann,T, AU - Anemüller,W, AU - Kromminga,A, AU - Ruëff,F, AU - Merk,H, AU - Wagner,N, AU - Treudler,R, AU - Worm,M, AU - Waldmann,I, AU - Saloga,J, AU - Becker,W M, AU - Goldmann,T, AU - Platts-Mills,T A, AU - Homann,A, Y1 - 2017/08/15/ PY - 2017/06/27/accepted PY - 2017/7/4/pubmed PY - 2018/7/10/medline PY - 2017/7/4/entrez KW - alpha-Gal KW - bovine thyroglobulin KW - cetuximab KW - delayed anaphylaxis KW - meat allergy SP - 93 EP - 105 JF - Allergy JO - Allergy VL - 73 IS - 1 N2 - BACKGROUND: Glycoproteins and glycolipids of some mammalian species contain the disaccharide galactosyl-α-(1,3)-galactose (α-Gal). It is known that α-Gal is immunogenic in humans and causes glycan-specific IgG and also IgE responses with clinical relevance. α-Gal is part of the IgE-reactive monoclonal therapeutic antibody cetuximab (CTX) and is associated with delayed anaphylaxis to red meat. In this study, different α-Gal-containing analytes are examined in singleplex and multiplex assays to resolve individual sensitization patterns with IgE against α-Gal. METHODS: Three serum groups, α-Gal-associated meat allergy (MA) patients, idiopathic anaphylaxis (IA) patients with suspected MA, and non-meat-allergic healthy control individuals (HC), were analyzed via singleplex allergy diagnostics and a newly established immunoblot diagnostic system. The new dot blot detection system resolved individual IgE sensitization profiles for α-Gal-containing analytes CTX, bovine thyroglobulin (Bos d TG), and human serum albumin (HSA)-conjugated α-Gal. RESULTS: Singleplex allergy diagnostics using the α-Gal analytes CTX and Bos d TG confirms the history of MA patients in 91% and 88% of the cases, respectively. A novel dot blot-based assay system for the detection of IgE against α-Gal reveals individual IgE sensitization profiles for α-Gal-containing analytes. An α-Gal-associated IgE cross-reactivity profile (IgE against CTX, Bos d TG, and HSA-α-Gal) was identified, which is associated with MA. CONCLUSIONS: Detection of individual sensitization patterns with different α-Gal-containing analytes provides the basis for an individual allergy diagnosis for α-Gal-sensitized patients. Higher amounts of α-Gal in pork and beef innards compared to muscle meat as indicated by a higher staining intensity are a plausible explanation for the difference in allergic symptom severity. SN - 1398-9995 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28670695/Meat_allergy_associated_with_galactosyl_α__13__galactose__α_Gal__Closing_diagnostic_gaps_by_anti_α_Gal_IgE_immune_profiling_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/all.13238 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -